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Human Rights Program Committee
(Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences)
2201 Dunton Tower
520-2600 ext 2368
http://carleton.ca/iis/programs-of-study/human-rights

This section presents the requirements for programs in:

Program Requirements

Human Rights and Social Justice
B.A. Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (9.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit from:1.0
HUMR 1001 [1.0]
Introduction to Human Rights
FYSM 1104 [1.0]
Human Rights: Issues and Investigations
FYSM 1502 [1.0]
Selected Topics in Legal Studies (specifically the section on Global Governance and Human Rights)
or approved FYSM
2.  0.5 credit in:0.5
HUMR 2001 [0.5]
Human Rights: Theories and Foundations
3.  0.5 credit in:0.5
HUMR 2202 [0.5]
Power Relations and Human Rights
4.  0.5 credit from:0.5
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
PHIL 2103 [0.5]
Philosophy of Human Rights
PSCI 3307 [0.5]
Politics of Human Rights
5. 2.5 credits, comprised of 0.5 credit from each of the five Thematic Groups (see list under Course Categories)2.5
6.  1.0 credit at the 4000-level from Thematic Groups and/or Human Rights Electives (see lists under Course Categories)1.0
7.  3.0 credits from Thematic Groups and/or Human Rights Electives (see lists under Course Categories)3.0
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (11.0 credits)
8.  11.0 credits in free electives.11.0
Total Credits20.0

Human Rights and Social Justice
B.A. Combined Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (7.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit from:1.0
HUMR 1001 [1.0]
Introduction to Human Rights
FYSM 1104 [1.0]
Human Rights: Issues and Investigations
FYSM 1502 [1.0]
Selected Topics in Legal Studies (specifically the section on Global Governance and Human Rights)
or approved FYSM
2.  0.5 credit in:0.5
HUMR 2001 [0.5]
Human Rights: Theories and Foundations
3.  0.5 credit in:0.5
HUMR 2202 [0.5]
Power Relations and Human Rights
4.  0.5 credit from:0.5
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
PHIL 2103 [0.5]
Philosophy of Human Rights
PSCI 3307 [0.5]
Politics of Human Rights
5. 2.5 credits, comprised of 0.5 credit from each of the five Thematic Groups (see list under Course Categories)2.5
6.  1.0 credit at the 4000-level from Thematic Groups and/or Human Rights Electives (see lists under Course Categories)1.0
7.  1.0 credit from Thematic Groups and/or Human Rights Electives (see lists under Course Categories)1.0
B. Additional Credit Requirements (13.0 credits)13.0
8. The requirements for the other discipline must be satisfied
9. Sufficient free electives to make 20.0 credits total for the program
Total Credits20.0

Human Rights and Law with Concentration in Transnational Law and Human Rights
B.A. Combined Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (7.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit from:1.0
HUMR 1001 [1.0]
Introduction to Human Rights
FYSM 1104 [1.0]
Human Rights: Issues and Investigations
FYSM 1502 [1.0]
Selected Topics in Legal Studies (the section on Global Governance and Human Rights)
or approved FYSM
2.  0.5 credit in:0.5
HUMR 2001 [0.5]
Human Rights: Theories and Foundations
3.  0.5 credit in:0.5
HUMR 2202 [0.5]
Power Relations and Human Rights
4. 2.5 credits, comprised of 0.5 credit from each of the five Thematic Groups (see list under Course Categories)2.5
5.  1.0 credit at the 4000-level from Thematic Groups and/or Human Rights Electives (see lists under Course Categories)1.0
6.  1.5 credits from Thematic Groups and/or Human Rights Electives (see lists under Course Categories)1.5
B. Additional Credit Requirements (13.0 credits)13.0
7. The requirements for the other discipline must be satisfied
8. Sufficient free electives to make 20.0 credits total for the program .
Total Credits20.0

Human Rights and Social Justice
B.A. General (15.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (7.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit from:1.0
HUMR 1001 [1.0]
Introduction to Human Rights
FYSM 1104 [1.0]
Human Rights: Issues and Investigations
FYSM 1502 [1.0]
Selected Topics in Legal Studies (specifically the section on Global Governance and Human Rights)
or an approved First-Year Seminar
2.  0.5 credit in:0.5
HUMR 2001 [0.5]
Human Rights: Theories and Foundations
3.  0.5 credit in:0.5
HUMR 2202 [0.5]
Power Relations and Human Rights
4.  0.5 credit from:0.5
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
PHIL 2103 [0.5]
Philosophy of Human Rights
PSCI 3307 [0.5]
Politics of Human Rights
5. 2.5 credits, comprised of 0.5 credit from each of the five Thematic Groups (see list under Course Categories)2.5
6.  1.0 credit at the 3000- or 4000-level from Thematic Groups and/or Human Rights Electives (see lists under Course Categories)1.0
7.  1.0 credit from Thematic groups and/or Human Rights Electives (see lists under Course Categories)1.0
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (8.0 credits)
8.  8.0 credits in free electives.8.0
Total Credits15.0

Minor in Human Rights and Social Justice (4.0 credits)

Open to all undergraduate students not in Human Rights and Social Justice B.A. programs.
Requirements:
1.  1.0 credit from:1.0
HUMR 1001 [1.0]
Introduction to Human Rights
or FYSM 1104 [1.0]
Human Rights: Issues and Investigations
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
HUMR 2001 [0.5]
& HUMR 2202 [0.5]
Human Rights: Theories and Foundations
Power Relations and Human Rights
3.  1.0 credit at the 2000-level or higher in Human Rights (HUMR) courses1.0
4.  1.0 credit at the 3000-level or higher in Human Rights (HUMR) courses1.0
Total Credits4.0

Course Categories by Thematic Group

Some of the Human Rights Electives have prerequisites that are not explicitly included in the program. Students should plan to have credit for the prerequisites of each course in their program or ask to have the prerequisite waived.
Laws and Institutions
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law
LAWS 3401 [0.5]
Employment Law
LAWS 3509 [0.5]
The Charter of Rights Topics
LAWS 3602 [0.5]
International Human Rights
LAWS 3604 [0.5]
International Organizations
LAWS 4601 [0.5]
Transnational Law and Human Rights
LAWS 4606 [0.5]
International Law of Armed Conflict
LAWS 4607 [0.5]
Immigration and Refugee Law
PSCI 2601 [0.5]
International Relations: Global Politics
PSCI 3600 [0.5]
International Institutions
PSCI 4109 [0.5]
The Politics of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
Critical Principles
HIST 3510 [0.5]
Indigenous Peoples of Canada
HUMR 2202 [0.5]
Power Relations and Human Rights
HUMR 3202 [0.5]
Human Rights and Resistance
HUMR 3503 [0.5]
Global Environmental Justice
HUMR 4201 [0.5]
Citizenship and Human Rights
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 4002 [0.5]
Feminist Theories of Law
LAWS 4101 [0.5]
Contemporary Justice Theories
LAWS 4102 [0.5]
Controversies in Rights Theory
LAWS 4105 [0.5]
Global Justice Theory
PHIL 2101 [0.5]
History of Ethics
PHIL 2103 [0.5]
Philosophy of Human Rights
PHIL 2306 [0.5]
Philosophy and Feminism
PHIL 2307 [0.5]
Gender and Philosophy
PHIL 2408 [0.5]
Bioethics
PHIL 3320 [0.5]
Contemporary Ethical Theory
PHIL 3330 [0.5]
Topics in History of Social and Political Philosophy
PHIL 3340 [0.5]
Topics in Contemporary Social and Political Philosophy
PSCI 3109 [0.5]
The Politics of Law and Morality
PSCI 3307 [0.5]
Politics of Human Rights
PSCI 3801 [0.5]
Environmental Politics
Marginalized Groups, Diversities & Identities
ANTH 2020 [0.5]
Race and Ethnicity
ANTH 3020 [0.5]
Studies in Race and Ethnicity
ANTH 3600 [0.5]
Studies in Anthropology and Indigenous Peoples
ANTH 4020 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in Race and Ethnicity
ANTH 4610 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in Indigenous Peoples
HIST 3403 [1.0]
Comparative Slavery and Emancipation in the Atlantic World
HIST 3710 [0.5]
Themes in Caribbean History
HUMR 2102 [0.5]
Sexuality, Gender, and Security
HUMR 2301 [0.5]
Human Rights and Sexualities
HUMR 3301 [0.5]
Racialization, Racism and Human Rights
HUMR 3302 [0.5]
Culture, Religion, and Women's Human Rights
HUMR 3303 [0.5]
Children's Rights
HUMR 4302 [0.5]
Transgender Human Rights
HUMR 4303 [0.5]
Disability Rights
HUMR 4401 [0.5]
Gender, Citizenship and Social Justice in a Transnational World
INDG 2011 [0.5]
Contemporary Indigenous Studies
INDG 3011 [0.5]
Indigenous Rights, Resistance, and Resurgence
LAWS 3503 [0.5]
Equality and Discrimination
LAWS 3504 [0.5]
Law and Aboriginal Peoples
LAWS 4001 [0.5]
Law, Family and Gender
LAWS 4002 [0.5]
Feminist Theories of Law
LAWS 4504 [0.5]
Aboriginal Criminal Justice
PSCI 2500 [0.5]
Gender and Politics
PSCI 3805 [0.5]
Politics of Race
PSCI 4206 [0.5]
Indigenous Politics of North America
PSCI 4403 [0.5]
Reproductive Rights Policy in North America
PSCI 4605 [0.5]
Gender in International Relations
SOCI 2020 [0.5]
Race and Ethnicity
SOCI 2045 [0.5]
Gender and Society
SOCI 3019 [0.5]
Sociology of International Migration
SOCI 3020 [0.5]
Studies in Race and Ethnicity
SOCI 3040 [0.5]
Studies in the Sociology of Gender
SOCI 4020 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in Race and Ethnicity
SOCI 4039 [0.5]
Women in Contemporary Middle East Societies
SOCI 4040 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in the Sociology of Gender
SOWK 4102 [0.5]
Indigenous Peoples and Social Policy
SOWK 4300 [0.5]
Social Work and Persons with Disabilities
SXST 2101 [0.5]
Sexuality Studies: A Critical Introduction
SXST 2102 [0.5]
Sexuality, Gender, and Security
SXST 4101 [0.5]
Interdisciplinary Studies of Sexuality
WGST 2800 [0.5]
Intersectional Identities
WGST 2803 [0.5]
Body Matters: The Politics of Bodies
WGST 3803 [0.5]
Feminisms and Transnationalism
WGST 3807 [0.5]
Gendered Violence
WGST 4803 [0.5]
Globalized Bodies
Political Violence, Persecution and Repression
HIST 3714 [0.5]
Holocaust Encounters
HUMR 2102 [0.5]
Sexuality, Gender, and Security
HUMR 2401 [0.5]
Political Repression: Impacts and Responses
HUMR 2402 [0.5]
Agents of Political Violence
HUMR 3401 [0.5]
Histories of Persecution and Genocide
HUMR 4402 [0.5]
Terror and Human Rights
HUMR 4404 [0.5]
Rights of Refugees and Displaced Persons
LAWS 4106 [0.5]
Law and Violence
LAWS 4304 [0.5]
Policing and Social Surveillance
LAWS 4309 [0.5]
State Security and Dissent
LAWS 4601 [0.5]
Transnational Law and Human Rights
LAWS 4603 [0.5]
Transitional Justice
LAWS 4606 [0.5]
International Law of Armed Conflict
LAWS 4607 [0.5]
Immigration and Refugee Law
PSCI 3107 [0.5]
The Causes of War
PSCI 3702 [0.5]
Israeli-Palestinian Relations
PSCI 4807 [0.5]
Migration and Mobility: Politics of Citizenship and Identity
PSCI 4817 [0.5]
International Politics of Forced Migration
RELI 3140 [0.5]
Holocaust Encounters
SOCI 2160 [0.5]
War and Society
SOCI 3160 [0.5]
Political Violence
SOCI 4160 [0.5]
War, Terrorism and State Terrorism
SOCI 4200 [0.5]
War, Security and Citizenship
SXST 2102 [0.5]
Sexuality, Gender, and Security
Social and Economic Justice
ANTH 2850 [0.5]
Development and Underdevelopment
ANTH 3025 [0.5]
Anthropology and Human Rights
ANTH 3027 [0.5]
Studies in Globalization and Human Rights
ANTH 4730 [0.5]
Colonialism and Post-Colonialism
ANTH 4750 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in Globalization and Citizenship
HIST 3217 [0.5]
Empire and Globalization
HIST 3702 [0.5]
The Scramble for Africa, 1876-1918
HUMR 2502 [0.5]
Social and Political Movements
HUMR 3002 [0.5]
Right to the City
HUMR 3501 [0.5]
Social, Economic and Cultural Rights
HUMR 3502 [0.5]
Corporations and Human Rights
HUMR 3503 [0.5]
Global Environmental Justice
HUMR 3504 [0.5]
Public Health and Human Rights
HUMR 4502 [0.5]
Global Indigenous Knowledges and Movements
LAWS 4001 [0.5]
Law, Family and Gender
LAWS 4800 [0.5]
Environment and Social Justice
PSCI 2102 [0.5]
Comparative Politics of the Global South
PSCI 2602 [0.5]
International Relations: Global Political Economy
PSCI 3100 [0.5]
Politics of Development in Africa
PSCI 3105 [0.5]
Imperialism
PSCI 3204 [0.5]
Politics of Latin America
PSCI 3502 [0.5]
Gender and Politics: Global South
PSCI 3802 [0.5]
Globalization and Human Rights
PSCI 4104 [0.5]
Development in the Global South - Theory and Practice
PSCI 4105 [0.5]
Selected Problems in Development in the Global South
PSCI 4500 [0.5]
Gender and Globalization
SOCI 2010 [0.5]
Power and Stratification
SOCI 2040 [0.5]
Food, Culture and Society
SOCI 2050 [0.5]
Sociology of Health
SOCI 3010 [0.5]
Studies in Power and Stratification
SOCI 3027 [0.5]
Globalization and Human Rights
SOCI 3040 [0.5]
Studies in the Sociology of Gender
SOCI 3044 [0.5]
Sociology of Sex and Sexuality
SOCI 3050 [0.5]
Studies in the Sociology of Health
SOCI 3056 [0.5]
Women and Health
SOCI 3430 [0.5]
Studies in Collective Action and Social Movements
SOCI 4010 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in Power and Stratification
SOCI 4040 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in the Sociology of Gender
SOCI 4730 [0.5]
Colonialism and Post-Colonialism
SOCI 4750 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in Globalization and Citizenship
SOWK 3206 [0.5]
Community Development and Social Change in an International Context
SOWK 3207 [0.5]
Human Rights Practice in Civil Society
WGST 2800 [0.5]
Intersectional Identities
WGST 2801 [0.5]
Activism, Feminisms, and Social Justice
WGST 2807 [0.5]
Issues in Reproductive Health
WGST 4807 [0.5]
Gender and Health in a Globalized World
Human Rights Electives
HUMR 3001 [0.5]
Special Topics in Human Rights
HUMR 4905 [0.5]
Practicum Placement in Human Rights I
HUMR 4906 [0.5]
Practicum Placement in Human Rights II
HUMR 4907 [0.5]
Special Topic in Human Rights
HUMR 4908 [0.5]
Independent Study

Human Rights (HUMR) Courses

HUMR 1001 [1.0 credit]
Introduction to Human Rights

Human rights from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics may include the foundations and nature of rights, roots of inequality and oppression, aboriginal rights, racism, women and rights, sexual orientation, state and corporate power, economic exploitation, the environment and rights, warfare, torture, and social movements.
Precludes additional credit for FYSM 1104 and ISSC 1001/ANTH 1010/SOCI 1010 (no longer offered).
Lecture and discussion groups three hours a week.

HUMR 2001 [0.5 credit]
Human Rights: Theories and Foundations

Historical overview of the theoretical and philosophical approaches underlying the human rights movement and relevant to the normative ideals and aspirations of human rights and to the strategies of their implementation.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures and discussion groups three hours a week.

HUMR 2102 [0.5 credit]
Sexuality, Gender, and Security

Historical and contemporary analysis of surveillance, security, and regulation of sexuality, race, class, and gender. Students will critically examine how ‘subversives’ were created through discourse and administrative logics such as policy and law.
Also listed as SXST 2102.
Prerequisite(s): second year standing or permission from the Institute.
Lectures and discussions three hours a week.

HUMR 2202 [0.5 credit]
Power Relations and Human Rights

The study of power from a critical, transnational perspective; the impact on human rights of different forms and modalities of power, including those emanating from the state and corporations and those implicated in socio-economic and other hierarchical relations.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures and discussion groups three hours a week.

HUMR 2301 [0.5 credit]
Human Rights and Sexualities

Human rights issues in various cultural contexts concerning sex and/or gender, with attention to sexual minorities such as gay, lesbian, and transgendered persons. Forms of discrimination against sexual minorities and the mechanisms and strategies for redress.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures and discussion groups three hours a week.

HUMR 2401 [0.5 credit]
Political Repression: Impacts and Responses

Canada is home-in-exile to many who have faced severe and often life-threatening political repression such as imprisonment, torture, surveillance, population transfer, etc. This course examines the impacts on survivors of political repression, and strategies used to overcome its legacies.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures and discussion groups three hours a week.

HUMR 2402 [0.5 credit]
Agents of Political Violence

The processes used in preparing individuals to commit torture, murder and other forms of violence on behalf of a state or associated organizations, and how such violence is justified by its direct perpetrators, their commanders (police/military and political), and members of their society.
Precludes additional credit for HUMR 3402 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures and discussion groups three hours a week.

HUMR 2502 [0.5 credit]
Social and Political Movements

The underlying conditions and developments of historical and contemporary social and political movements; specific social movements such as civil rights or gay rights.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures and discussion groups three hours a week.

HUMR 3001 [0.5 credit]
Special Topics in Human Rights

This advanced seminar will cover current and topical issues and/or debates in human rights, and will enable students to engage in focused discussions and analyses of these issues. Topics will vary from year to year.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures three hours a week.

HUMR 3002 [0.5 credit]
Right to the City

“The right to the city” as an emerging focus of advocacy and analysis in urban movements for social justice around especially the local and transnational dimensions of the “right to the city” movement.
Precludes additional credit for HUMR 3001 if taken prior to 2013-14.
Prerequisite(s): third year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures three hours a week.

HUMR 3202 [0.5 credit]
Human Rights and Resistance

This course problematizes human rights paradigms and critically examines the limitations of the political within liberal democracies. Bringing together theory and politics, alternative approaches to activism are explored. Topics may include struggles grounded in radical democracy, anti-capitalism, and social justice perspectives.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures three hours a week.

HUMR 3301 [0.5 credit]
Racialization, Racism and Human Rights

The forms and effects of systemic race-based human rights abuses. Topics may include immigration and refugee policies and practices, anti-apartheid regimes, racial profiling, the racial politics of "nationhood" and armed conflict, civil rights and resistance movements in differing cultural contexts.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures three hours a week.

HUMR 3302 [0.5 credit]
Culture, Religion, and Women's Human Rights

The impact of cultural and religious traditions on women's human rights. Topics may include the impact of gender roles on the status of women, cultural relativism, and strategies used to advance women's human rights such as NGOs engagements with CEDAW.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures three hours a week.

HUMR 3303 [0.5 credit]
Children's Rights

This course profiles the global human rights issues of children and relates them to the international treaties and mechanisms to address them. Topics may include children in armed conflict; child sex tourism; the rights of indigenous children; and gender-based violence against children.
Also listed as CHST 3303.
Precludes additional credit for CHST 3901 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures three hours a week.

HUMR 3401 [0.5 credit]
Histories of Persecution and Genocide

Case studies in persecution and/or genocide in different cultural contexts. The social, political, and legal conditions that have enabled the institutional or state-sanctioned persecution of targeted groups, and the circumstances that had an impact on their decline.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures three hours a week.

HUMR 3501 [0.5 credit]
Social, Economic and Cultural Rights

The development of social, economic and cultural rights, including rights to housing, healthcare, education and employment. Topics may include the international geopolitics of the historical tension between these rights and civil and political rights.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures three hours a week.

HUMR 3502 [0.5 credit]
Corporations and Human Rights

Corporate involvement in human rights violations, with attention to how corporations encourage, participate in, and benefit from political repression and warfare. How the relationship between corporate and state interests affects the implementation of measures for corporate accountability.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures three hours a week.

HUMR 3503 [0.5 credit]
Global Environmental Justice

Overview of critical debates on environmental issues from a global social justice perspective. Topics may include corporate mining, food sovereignty, poverty, economic exploitation, Indigenous cosmologies and environmental justice, militarization and environmental degradation, privatization of water and climate change.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures three hours a week.

HUMR 3504 [0.5 credit]
Public Health and Human Rights

Through a social-scientific analysis of AIDS, this course explores HIV/AIDS as a case study for understanding the politics of public health. Students will critically interrogate the authority of science and explore avenues for democratizing biomedicine and public health policy in various national and policy contexts.
Precludes additional credit for HUMR 3001 Section "A" if taken in 2013-14 and 2014-15.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Lectures three hours a week.

HUMR 4201 [0.5 credit]
Citizenship and Human Rights

The relationship between citizenship and human rights; how large groups of people, including non-citizens and refugees, are excluded from entitlements to rights. Why human rights rest on citizenship, and with what implications.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

HUMR 4302 [0.5 credit]
Transgender Human Rights

Critical analyses of human rights through an examination of transgender subjectivities. The systemic erasure of trans people within society and the struggles of some activists to normalize trans identities.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

HUMR 4303 [0.5 credit]
Disability Rights

A critical approach to the study of disability rights by exploring the intersections of disability with race, sexuality, gender, colonialism, ‘health’, and other discourses.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

HUMR 4401 [0.5 credit]
Gender, Citizenship and Social Justice in a Transnational World

This seminar critically engages with transnational, gendered, classed, and racialized discursive practices of citizenship, human rights, the geopolitics of knowledge and processes of dehumanization through the lenses of decolonial social justice.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

HUMR 4402 [0.5 credit]
Terror and Human Rights

The human rights implications of terror, terrorism and/or the "war on terror." Topics may include the use of terrorism as a justification for the use of military force, and the impact of racial profiling, arrest warrants, security certificates; detentions; and deportations.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

HUMR 4404 [0.5 credit]
Rights of Refugees and Displaced Persons

Contemporary issues concerning the rights of refugees and displaced persons, from social, political, and legal perspectives; Canadian and international dimensions of these issues.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

HUMR 4502 [0.5 credit]
Global Indigenous Knowledges and Movements

Indigenous Peoples contributions to world knowledge through community resistance, social movements and scholarship. How processes of corporate globalization impact Indigenous Peoples lives as an ongoing process of normalizing a reconfigured modern coloniality of power.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

HUMR 4905 [0.5 credit]
Practicum Placement in Human Rights I

This course provides students with the opportunity to spend one day per week (6-8 hours) working and learning at a human rights-related government, research or advocacy organization. A written report is required at the end of the placement. Graded as Sat/Uns.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing in Human Rights or permission of the Institute.

HUMR 4906 [0.5 credit]
Practicum Placement in Human Rights II

This course provides students with the opportunity to spend one day per week (6-8 hours) working and learning at a human rights-related government, research or advocacy organization. A written report is required at the end of the placement. Graded as Sat/Uns.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing in Human Rights and a GPA of 9.8 or higher or permission of the Institute.


HUMR 4907 [0.5 credit]
Special Topic in Human Rights

This course features a detailed study of a special topic in any area of Human Rights. Topics and themes will vary from year to year.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

HUMR 4908 [0.5 credit]
Independent Study

Essays and/or examinations based on a bibliography constructed by the student in consultation with an instructor.
Prerequisite(s): normally restricted to students with at least 3.0 credits of Human Rights courses with at least a CGPA of 9.0 or better in Human Rights courses and permission of the Institute.

Summer session: some of the courses listed in this Calendar are offered during the summer. Hours and scheduling for summer session courses will differ significantly from those reported in the fall/winter Calendar. To determine the scheduling and hours for summer session classes, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Not all courses listed are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for the current session and to determine the term of offering, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Regulations (B.A.)

The regulations presented below apply to all Bachelor of Arts programs. In addition to the requirements presented here, students must satisfy the University regulations common to all undergraduate students including the process of Academic Performance Evaluation (consult the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar).

First-Year Seminars

B.A. degree students are strongly encouraged to include a First-Year Seminar (FYSM) during their first 4.0 credits of registration. Students are limited to 1.0 credit in FYSM and can only register in a FYSM while they have first-year standing in their B.A. program. Students who have completed the Enriched Support Program (ESP) or who are required to take a minimum of one English as a Second Language (ESLA) credit are not permitted to register in a FYSM.

Breadth Requirement

Among the credits presented at graduation, students in both the B.A. General and the B.A. Honours degrees and B.Co.M.S. are required to include 3.0 breadth credits, including 1.0 credit from each of three of the four Breadth Areas identified below. Credits that fulfil requirements in the Major, Minor, Concentration or Specialization may be used to fulfil the Breadth Requirement.

Students admitted with a completed university degree are exempt from breadth requirements.

Students in the following interdisciplinary programs are exempt from the B.A. breadth requirement.

  • African Studies
  • Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • Environmental Studies
  • Human Rights
Breadth Area 1: Culture and Communication

American Sign Language, Art History, Art and Culture, Communication and Media Studies, Comparative Literary Studies, Digital Humanities, English, Film Studies, French, Journalism, Music, and Languages (Arabic, English as a Second Language, German, Greek, Hebrew, Indigenous Languages, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish)

Subject codes: ARAB, ARTH, ASLA, CHIN, CLST, COMS, DIGH, ENGL, ESLA, FILM, FINS, FREN, GERM, GREK, HEBR, ITAL, JAPA, JOUR, LANG, LATN, MUSI, PORT, RUSS, SPAN

Breadth Area 2: Humanities

African Studies, Applied Linguistics and Discourse Studies, Canadian Studies, Child Studies, Classical Civilization, Directed Interdisciplinary Studies, Disability Studies, European and Russian Studies, History, Human Rights, Humanities, Indigenous Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Linguistics, Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Philosophy, Religion, Sexuality Studies, South Asian Studies, and Women's and Gender Studies.

Subject codes: AFRI, ALDS, CDNS, CHST, CLCV, DBST, DIST, EURR, HIST, HUMR, HUMS, INDG, LACS, LING, MEMS, PHIL, RELI, SAST, SXST, WGST

Breadth Area 3: Science, Engineering, and Design

Architecture, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Engineering, Environmental Science, Food Science and Nutrition, Health Sciences, Industrial Design, Mathematics, Neuroscience, Statistics, Physics, and Technology, Society, Environment.

Subject codes: AERO, ARCC, ARCH, ARCN, ARCS, ARCU, BIOC, BIOL, CHEM, CIVE, CMPS, COMP, ECOR, ELEC, ENSC, ENVE, ERTH, FOOD, HLTH, IDES, ISCI, ISCS, ISYS, MAAE, MATH, MECH, NEUR, NSCI, PHYS, SREE, STAT, SYSC, TSES

Breadth Area 4: Social Sciences

Anthropology, Business, Cognitive Science, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Economics, Environmental Studies, Geography, Geomatics, Global and International Studies, Global Politics, Interdisciplinary Public Affairs, International Affairs, Law, Migration and Diaspora Studies, Political Management, Political Science, Psychology, Public Administration, Public Affairs and Policy Management, Social Work, Sociology/Anthropology, Sociology

Subject codes: ANTH, BUSI, CGSC, CRCJ, ECON, ENST, GEOG, GEOM, GINS, GPOL, INAF, IPAF, LAWS, MGDS, PADM, PAPM, POLM, PSCI, PSYC, SOCI, SOWK

Declared and Undeclared Students

Students who are registered in a program within the degree are called Declared students. Most students designate a program of study when they first apply for admission and so begin their studies as Declared students. Students may also choose to begin their studies within the B.A. degree without being registered in a program. These students are referred to as Undeclared. The recommended course pattern for Undeclared students is outlined under Undeclared in the Programs section of this Calendar. Undeclared students must apply to enter a program before beginning their second year of study. The Student Academic Success Centre offers support to Undeclared students in making this decision.

Change of Program Within the B.A. Degree

Students may transfer to a program within the B.A. degree, if upon entry to the new program they would be in Good Standing . Other applications for change of program will be considered on their merits; students may be admitted to the new program in Good Standing or on Academic Warning. Students may apply to declare or change their program within the B.A. Degree at the Registrar's Office according to the published deadlines. Acceptance into a program or into a program element or option is subject to any enrollment limitations, specific program, program element or option requirements, as published in the relevant Calendar entry.

Minors, Concentrations and Specializations

Students may apply to the Registrar's Office to be admitted to a minor, concentration or specialization during their first or subsequent years of study. Acceptance into a minor, concentration or specialization is subject to any specific requirements of the intended Minor, Concentration or Specialization as published in the relevant Calendar entry. Acceptance into a Concentration or Specialization requires that the student be in Good Standing.

Mention : Français

Students registered in certain B.A. programs may earn the notation Mention : Français by completing part of their requirements in French and by demonstrating a knowledge of the history and culture of French Canada. The general requirements are listed below. For more specific details consult the departmental program entries.

Students in a B.A. Honours program must present:

  1. 1.0 credit in French language;
  2. 1.0 credit devoted to the history and culture of French Canada;
  3. 1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level and 1.0 credit at the 4000-level in the Honours discipline taken in French.

Students in a B.A. General program must present:

  1. 1.0 credit in advanced French;
  2. 1.0 credit devoted to the history and culture of French Canada;
  3. 1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level in the Major discipline taken in French.

Students in Combined Honours programs must fulfil the Mention : Français requirement in both disciplines.

Courses taught in French (Item 3, above) may be taken at Carleton, at the University of Ottawa on the Exchange Agreement, or at a francophone university on a Letter of Permission. Students planning to take courses on exchange or on a Letter of Permission should take careful note of the residence requirement for a minimum number of Carleton courses in their programs. Consult the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar for information regarding study on Exchange or Letter of Permission.

Admissions Information

Admission Requirements are for the 2017-2018 year only, and are based on the Ontario High School System. Holding the minimum admission requirements only establishes eligibility for consideration. The cut-off averages for admission may be considerably higher than the minimum. See also the General Admission and Procedures section of this Calendar. An overall average of at least 70% is normally required to be considered for admission. Some programs may also require specific course prerequisites and prerequisite averages and/or supplementary admission portfolios. Higher averages are required for admission to programs for which the demand for places by qualified applicants exceeds the number of places available. The overall average required for admission is determined each year on a program by program basis. Consult admissions.carleton.ca for further details.

Admission Requirements

Degrees

  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)(Honours)
  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)(General)

First Year

For B.A. (General) and B.A. (Honours)
The Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent including a minimum of six 4U or M courses. The six 4U or M courses must include a 4U course in English (or anglais ). For applicants whose first language is not English, the requirement of English can also be met under the conditions outlined in the section “English Language Requirements” in the Admissions Requirements and Procedures section of this Calendar.

The cut-off average for admission will be set annually and will normally be above the minimum requirement. Applicants falling slightly below the cut-off average will be considered on an individual basis to determine whether there are special circumstances that would permit their admission. Students who feel that their high school grade average does not reflect their potential may apply to the Enriched Support Program (see the Enriched Support Program section of this Calendar).

Advanced Standing

B.A. (General and Honours) Program

Applications for admission to the second or subsequent years will be assessed on their merits. Advanced standing will be granted only for those courses that are determined to be appropriate.