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School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
1206 Dunton Tower
613-520-2366
https://carleton.ca/sics/indigenous-studies/

This section presents the requirements for programs in:

Program Requrements

Indigenous Studies
B.A. Combined Honours (20.0 Credits)

A. Credits Included in the Indigenous Studies Major (7.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
INDG 1010 [0.5]
Introduction to Indigenous Peoplehood Studies
INDG 1011 [0.5]
Introduction to Indigenous-Settler Encounters
2.  1.5 credits in:1.5
INDG 2011 [0.5]
Contemporary Indigenous Studies
INDG 2015 [0.5]
Indigenous Ecological Ways of Knowing
INDG 2020 [0.5]
Decolonizing Gender, Sex, and Sexuality
3.  1.0 credit in:1.0
INDG 3001 [0.5]
Indigenous Governance
INDG 3015 [0.5]
Indigenous Ecological Ways of Knowing and the Academy
4.  1.0 credit in:1.0
INDG 4001 [0.5]
Indigeneity in the City
INDG 4011 [0.5]
Indigenous Representations
5. 1.5 credits from the list of Approved INDG electives1.5
6. 1.0 credit at the 4000-level from the list of Approved INDG electives1.0
B. Additional Requirements (13.0 credits)13.0
7. The requirements for Combined Honours in the other discipline must be satisfied
8. Sufficient free electives to achieve a total of 20.0 credits for the program
Total Credits20.0

Minor in Indigenous Studies (4.0 credits)

The Minor in Indigenous Studies is open to all undergraduate degree students.

Requirements:
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
INDG 1010 [0.5]
Introduction to Indigenous Peoplehood Studies
INDG 1011 [0.5]
Introduction to Indigenous-Settler Encounters
2.  1.0 credit from:1.0
INDG 2011 [0.5]
Contemporary Indigenous Studies
INDG 2012 [0.5]
Anishinaabe Studies
INDG 2013 [0.5]
Haudenosaunee Studies
INDG 2015 [0.5]
Indigenous Ecological Ways of Knowing
INDG 2020 [0.5]
Decolonizing Gender, Sex, and Sexuality
3.  1.0 credit from:1.0
INDG 3001 [0.5]
Indigenous Governance
INDG 3011 [0.5]
Indigenous Rights, Resistance, and Resurgence
INDG 3015 [0.5]
Indigenous Ecological Ways of Knowing and the Academy
INDG 3901 [0.5]
Selected Topics in Indigenous Studies
INDG 4001 [0.5]
Indigeneity in the City
INDG 4011 [0.5]
Indigenous Representations
INDG 4015 [0.5]
Land as a Relation
INDG 4020 [0.5]
Practicum
INDG 4905 [0.5]
Directed Studies I
4.  1.0 credit from the list of approved Indigenous Studies Electives1.0
5. The remaining requirements of the major discipline(s) and degree must be satisfied.
Total Credits4.0

Indigenous Studies (INDG) Courses

INDG 1010 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Indigenous Peoplehood Studies

This course begins by looking at Creation Stories of different Indigenous peoples and builds to discuss Indigenous worldviews, ways of living, ecological relationships, inter-Indigenous relations and diplomacy among Indigenous peoples. Course materials are rooted in self-situated and collective understandings of Indigenous peoples.
Precludes additional credit for INDG 1000 (no longer offered).
Lecture/groups, three hours a week.

INDG 1011 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Indigenous-Settler Encounters

An interdisciplinary examination of the history of relations between different Indigenous peoples and settler populations from first meetings to the mid-20th century. Topics vary by year, but may include diplomatic relations, trade, spirituality and religion, military alliances, policy, education.
Precludes additional credit for INDG 1000 (no longer offered).
Lecture/groups, three hours a week.

INDG 2011 [0.5 credit]
Contemporary Indigenous Studies

Indigenous and non-Indigenous perspectives on issues since the 1960s. Topics include: contemporary explorations of treaty relationship and governance, cultural appropriation, identity politics, urban Aboriginality and contemporary social and cultural issues.
Precludes additional credit for CDNS 2100 and CDNS 2011.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies.
Lectures/groups three hours a week.

INDG 2012 [0.5 credit]
Anishinaabe Studies

In-depth look at the Anishinaabe peoples. Topics may include: Anishinaabe creation stories, migration, the clan system, worldviews; oral, written, and recorded history; treaties, contemporary events, ecological knowing, cultural production, relations with settler-colonies and other nations, self-governance, diplomatic relations.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the School of Canadian Studies.
Lecture/groups three hours a week.

INDG 2013 [0.5 credit]
Haudenosaunee Studies

Focuses on the Haudenosaunee from the founding of the Confederacy to present. Discussion of the culture, language, and structure of Haudenosaunee society, the Kaienerekowa (Great Law of Peace) and the Code of Handsome Lake, symbolism, and contemporary issues, including the impact of Euro-Canadian government policies.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies.
Lecture/groups, three hours a week.

INDG 2015 [0.5 credit]
Indigenous Ecological Ways of Knowing

Indigenous peoples’ relationships with the non-human world in both historical and contemporary contexts. Topics may include: the origins of Indigenous ecological ways of knowing, Indigenous languages, collective stewardship, water, land, and challenges to maintaining traditional knowledge.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies.
Lecture/groups, three hours a week.

INDG 2020 [0.5 credit]
Decolonizing Gender, Sex, and Sexuality

Effects of colonization in unbalancing Indigenous peoples’ lives through the imposition of constructions of gender, sex, and sexuality, and the ways that Indigenous peoples are working to restore balance to their families and communities. Topics vary by year.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies.
Lecture/groups, three hours a week.

INDG 3000 [0.5 credit]
Indigenous Governance

An examination and discussion of different Indigenous forms of governance. Topics will vary by year and may include: Indigenous ways of knowing and forms of governance, community leadership, diplomatic relations, and struggles for self-determination.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in Canadian Studies or permission of the School of Canadian Studies.
Seminar three hours a week.

INDG 3001 [0.5 credit]
Indigenous Governance

An examination and discussion of different Indigenous forms of governance. Topics will vary by year and may include: Indigenous ways of knowing and forms of governance, community leadership, diplomatic relations, and struggles for self-determination.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in Canadian Studies or permission of the School of Canadian Studies.
Seminar three hours per week.

INDG 3011 [0.5 credit]
Indigenous Rights, Resistance, and Resurgence

Indigenous approaches to restoring balance within their nations. Topics include: direct action; political organizing; land claims; rights, courts, and legal action; everyday acts of resistance and resurgence such as petitioning, social media, arts-based movements, and community initiatives.
Precludes additional credit for INDG 3010.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in Canadian Studies or permission of the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies.
Seminar three hours per week.

INDG 3015 [0.5 credit]
Indigenous Ecological Ways of Knowing and the Academy

The relationship between Indigenous traditional ecological knowledges and the academy. Topics include: linguistic barriers, tensions in diffuse ways of knowing, research ethics with respect to Indigenous traditional knowledge, and working with knowledge holders.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in Indigenous and Canadian Studies or permission of the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies.
Seminar three hours per week.

INDG 3901 [0.5 credit]
Selected Topics in Indigenous Studies

Topics vary from year to year.
Prerequisite(s): third- or fourth-year standing, or permission of the School of Canadian Indigenous and Studies.
Seminar three hours per week.

INDG 4001 [0.5 credit]
Indigeneity in the City

This course begins with an examination of the relationship between Indigenous peoples and the construction of cities and urban space. Culminates in the undertaking of research projects that directly link students to the urban Indigenous community in Ottawa.
Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing or permission of the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies.
Seminar three hours per week.

INDG 4011 [0.5 credit]
Indigenous Representations

Through an examination of instances of Indigenous misrepresentation, students will explore how Indigenous peoples have used cultural production in various forms (such as literature, film, television, visual arts, music, performance) to put forth their own visions of their peoples, worldviews, and lives.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing or permission of the School of Canadian Studies.
Seminar three hours a week.

INDG 4015 [0.5 credit]
Land as a Relation

This is an intensive 14-day field course that brings students together with knowledge holders on the land. The connections between Indigenous ways of knowing, the land, Indigenous languages, and the land’s non-human inhabitants, will be explored. Locations and course fee varies by year.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing or permission of the School of Canadian Studies.
Fourteen-day field course.

INDG 4020 [0.5 credit]
Practicum

Students will learn to apply their knowledge of topics in Indigenous Studies with a local organization whose mandate involves working with and/or for Indigenous peoples. To be arranged in consultation with the Program Coordinator.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing or permission of the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies.


INDG 4905 [0.5 credit]
Directed Studies I

An optional course normally restricted to fourth-year Honours students in Canadian Studies or Indigenous Studies and to Qualifying-year Graduate students. Includes supervised reading and written work in an Indigenous Studies area.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing or permission of the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies.


Summer session: some of the courses listed in this Calendar are offered during the summer. Hours and scheduling for summer session courses will differ significantly from those reported in the fall/winter Calendar. To determine the scheduling and hours for summer session classes, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Not all courses listed are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for the current session and to determine the term of offering, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

B.A. Regulations

The regulations presented below apply to all Bachelor of Arts programs. In addition to the requirements presented here, students must satisfy the University regulations common to all undergraduate students including the process of Academic Performance Evaluation (consult the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar).

First-Year Seminars

B.A. degree students are strongly encouraged to include a First-Year Seminar (FYSM) during their first 4.0 credits of registration. Students are limited to 1.0 credit in FYSM and can only register in a FYSM while they have first-year standing in their B.A. program. Students who have completed the Enriched Support Program (ESP) or who are required to take a minimum of one English as a Second Language (ESLA) credit are not permitted to register in a FYSM.

Breadth Requirement

Among the credits presented at graduation, students in both the B.A. General and the B.A. Honours degrees and B.Co.M.S. are required to include 3.0 breadth credits, including 1.0 credit from each of three of the four Breadth Areas identified below. Credits that fulfil requirements in the Major, Minor, Concentration or Specialization may be used to fulfil the Breadth Requirement.

Students admitted with a completed university degree are exempt from breadth requirements.

Students in the following interdisciplinary programs are exempt from the B.A. breadth requirement.

  • African Studies
  • Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • Environmental Studies
  • Human Rights
Breadth Area 1: Culture and Communication

American Sign Language, Art History, Art and Culture, Communication and Media Studies, Comparative Literary Studies, Digital Humanities, English, Film Studies, French, Journalism, Music, and Languages (Arabic, English as a Second Language, German, Greek, Hebrew, Indigenous Languages, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish)

Subject codes: ARAB, ARTH, ASLA, CHIN, CLST, COMS, DIGH, ENGL, ESLA, FILM, FINS, FREN, GERM, GREK, HEBR, ITAL, JAPA, JOUR, LANG, LATN, MUSI, PORT, RUSS, SPAN

Breadth Area 2: Humanities

African Studies, Applied Linguistics and Discourse Studies, Canadian Studies, Child Studies, Classical Civilization, Directed Interdisciplinary Studies, Disability Studies, European and Russian Studies, History, Human Rights, Humanities, Indigenous Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Linguistics, Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Philosophy, Religion, Sexuality Studies, South Asian Studies, and Women's and Gender Studies.

Subject codes: AFRI, ALDS, CDNS, CHST, CLCV, DBST, DIST, EURR, HIST, HUMR, HUMS, INDG, LACS, LING, MEMS, PHIL, RELI, SAST, SXST, WGST

Breadth Area 3: Science, Engineering, and Design

Architecture, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Engineering, Environmental Science, Food Science and Nutrition, Health Sciences, Industrial Design, Mathematics, Neuroscience, Statistics, Physics, and Technology, Society, Environment.

Subject codes: AERO, ARCC, ARCH, ARCN, ARCS, ARCU, BIOC, BIOL, CHEM, CIVE, CMPS, COMP, ECOR, ELEC, ENSC, ENVE, ERTH, FOOD, HLTH, IDES, ISCI, ISCS, ISYS, MAAE, MATH, MECH, NEUR, NSCI, PHYS, SREE, STAT, SYSC, TSES

Breadth Area 4: Social Sciences

Anthropology, Business, Cognitive Science, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Economics, Environmental Studies, Geography, Geomatics, Global and International Studies, Global Politics, Interdisciplinary Public Affairs, International Affairs, Law, Migration and Diaspora Studies, Political Management, Political Science, Psychology, Public Administration, Public Affairs and Policy Management, Social Work, Sociology/Anthropology, Sociology

Subject codes: ANTH, BUSI, CGSC, CRCJ, ECON, ENST, GEOG, GEOM, GINS, GPOL, INAF, IPAF, LAWS, MGDS, PADM, PAPM, POLM, PSCI, PSYC, SOCI, SOWK

Declared and Undeclared Students

Students who are registered in a program within the degree are called Declared students. Most students designate a program of study when they first apply for admission and so begin their studies as Declared students. Students may also choose to begin their studies within the B.A. degree without being registered in a program. These students are referred to as Undeclared. The recommended course pattern for Undeclared students is outlined under Undeclared in the Programs section of this Calendar. Undeclared students must apply to enter a program before beginning their second year of study. The Student Academic Success Centre offers support to Undeclared students in making this decision.

Change of Program Within the B.A. Degree

Students may transfer to a program within the B.A. degree, if upon entry to the new program they would be in Good Standing . Other applications for change of program will be considered on their merits; students may be admitted to the new program in Good Standing or on Academic Warning. Students may apply to declare or change their program within the B.A. Degree at the Registrar's Office according to the published deadlines. Acceptance into a program or into a program element or option is subject to any enrollment limitations, specific program, program element or option requirements, as published in the relevant Calendar entry.

Minors, Concentrations and Specializations

Students may apply to the Registrar's Office to be admitted to a minor, concentration or specialization during their first or subsequent years of study. Acceptance into a minor, concentration or specialization is subject to any specific requirements of the intended Minor, Concentration or Specialization as published in the relevant Calendar entry. Acceptance into a Concentration or Specialization requires that the student be in Good Standing.

Mention : Français

Students registered in certain B.A. programs may earn the notation Mention : Français by completing part of their requirements in French and by demonstrating a knowledge of the history and culture of French Canada. The general requirements are listed below. For more specific details consult the departmental program entries.

Students in a B.A. Honours program must present:

  1. 1.0 credit in French language;
  2. 1.0 credit devoted to the history and culture of French Canada;
  3. 1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level and 1.0 credit at the 4000-level in the Honours discipline taken in French.

Students in a B.A. General program must present:

  1. 1.0 credit in advanced French;
  2. 1.0 credit devoted to the history and culture of French Canada;
  3. 1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level in the Major discipline taken in French.

Students in Combined Honours programs must fulfil the Mention : Français requirement in both disciplines.

Courses taught in French (Item 3, above) may be taken at Carleton, at the University of Ottawa on the Exchange Agreement, or at a francophone university on a Letter of Permission. Students planning to take courses on exchange or on a Letter of Permission should take careful note of the residence requirement for a minimum number of Carleton courses in their programs. Consult the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar for information regarding study on Exchange or Letter of Permission.

Admissions Information

Admission Requirements are for the 2017-2018 year only, and are based on the Ontario High School System. Holding the minimum admission requirements only establishes eligibility for consideration. The cut-off averages for admission may be considerably higher than the minimum. See also the General Admission and Procedures section of this Calendar. An overall average of at least 70% is normally required to be considered for admission. Some programs may also require specific course prerequisites and prerequisite averages and/or supplementary admission portfolios. Higher averages are required for admission to programs for which the demand for places by qualified applicants exceeds the number of places available. The overall average required for admission is determined each year on a program by program basis. Consult admissions.carleton.ca for further details.

Admission Requirements

Degrees

  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)(Honours)
  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)(General)

First Year

For B.A. (General) and B.A. (Honours)
The Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent including a minimum of six 4U or M courses. The six 4U or M courses must include a 4U course in English (or anglais ). For applicants whose first language is not English, the requirement of English can also be met under the conditions outlined in the section “English Language Requirements” in the Admissions Requirements and Procedures section of this Calendar.

The cut-off average for admission will be set annually and will normally be above the minimum requirement. Applicants falling slightly below the cut-off average will be considered on an individual basis to determine whether there are special circumstances that would permit their admission. Students who feel that their high school grade average does not reflect their potential may apply to the Enriched Support Program (see the Enriched Support Program section of this Calendar).

Advanced Standing

B.A. (General and Honours) Program

Applications for admission to the second or subsequent years will be assessed on their merits. Advanced standing will be granted only for those courses that are determined to be appropriate.