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Department of Law and Legal Studies
(Faculty of Public Affairs)
C473 Loeb Bldg.
613-520-3690
http://carleton.ca/law

This section presents the requirements for programs in:

Program Requirements

Law
B.A. Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (9.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
2.  2.0 credits from:2.0
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2201 [0.5]
Persons and Property
LAWS 2202 [0.5]
Obligations
LAWS 2301 [0.5]
Criminal Justice System
LAWS 2302 [0.5]
Criminal Law
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law (See Note 1, below)
3.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies I
LAWS 3908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies II
4.  3.0 credits in LAWS at the 4000-level or above or in IPAF 4900 (with permission of the department).3.0
5.  2.0 credits in LAWS2.0
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (11.0 credits)
6.  8.0 credits in electives not in LAWS8.0
7.  3.0 credits in free electives.3.0
Total Credits20.0

Notes:

  1. Law Area Requirement:
    For Item 2 above, students must complete at least:
  2. Students with a Major in Law are encouraged, but not required, to consider completing a Minor in another discipline in order to broaden their exposure to that discipline.

Law
B.A. Combined Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Law Major CGPA (6.5 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
2.  2.0 credits from:2.0
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2201 [0.5]
Persons and Property
LAWS 2202 [0.5]
Obligations
LAWS 2301 [0.5]
Criminal Justice System
LAWS 2302 [0.5]
Criminal Law
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law (See Note 1, below)
3.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies I
LAWS 3908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies II
4.  0.5 credit in LAWS at the 3000-level or above0.5
5.  2.0 credits in LAWS at the 4000-level or above2.0
B. Additional Requirements (13.5 credits)13.5
6. The requirements for B.A. Combined Honours in the other discipline
7. Sufficient free electives to make up 20.0 credits total for the program.
Total Credits20.0

Notes:

  1. Law Area Requirement:
    For Item 2 above, students must complete at least:

Law and Human Rights
B.A. Combined Honours (20.0 credits)

Students may complete a B.A.(Honours) in Law and Human Rights. Students must complete the Law - B.A. Combined Honours requirements stated above. The Human Rights requirements are offered jointly by the Departments of Law, Philosophy, Political Science and Sociology: please consult the Human Rights program entry for details concerning the Human Rights component of the program.

Law with Concentration in Law, Policy and Government
B.A. Honours (20.0 credits)

Continuation in this concentration requires a minimum CGPA of 6.50 over credits in the concentration.
The courses defining the Concentration in Law, Policy and Government are those in Items 2, 5, 6, 7 below.

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (10.5 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen
3.  1.5 credits from:1.5
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2201 [0.5]
Persons and Property
LAWS 2202 [0.5]
Obligations
LAWS 2301 [0.5]
Criminal Justice System
LAWS 2302 [0.5]
Criminal Law
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law (See Note 1, below)
4.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies I
LAWS 3908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies II
5.  1.5 credits in:1.5
LAWS 3005 [0.5]
Law and Regulation
LAWS 3506 [0.5]
Administrative Law
LAWS 4801 [0.5]
Risk and the Legal Process
6.  2.0 credits from:2.0
LAWS 3106 [0.5]
Sociology of Law
LAWS 3405 [0.5]
Labour Law
LAWS 3500 [0.5]
Constitutional Law
LAWS 3502 [0.5]
Regulating Freedom of Expression in Canada
LAWS 3503 [0.5]
Equality and Discrimination
LAWS 3504 [0.5]
Law and Aboriginal Peoples
LAWS 3509 [0.5]
The Charter of Rights Topics
LAWS 3800 [0.5]
Law of Environmental Quality
7.  1.5 credits from:1.5
LAWS 4006 [0.5]
Religion and State in Canada
LAWS 4101 [0.5]
Contemporary Justice Theories
LAWS 4102 [0.5]
Controversies in Rights Theory
LAWS 4507 [0.5]
Administrative Law and Control
LAWS 4510 [0.5]
Topics in Law, Policy and Government
LAWS 4603 [0.5]
Transitional Justice
LAWS 4607 [0.5]
Immigration and Refugee Law
LAWS 4800 [0.5]
Environment and Social Justice
LAWS 4901 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law
LAWS 4902 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law
LAWS 4908 [1.0]
Honours Paper
8.  1.0 credit in LAWS at the 4000-level or above1.0
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (9.5 credits)
9.  8.0 credits in electives not in LAWS8.0
10.  1.5 credits in free electives.1.5
Total Credits20.0

Notes:

  1. Law Area Requirement:
    For Item 3 above, students must complete at least:
  2. Students who count LAWS 4901, LAWS 4902 or LAWS 4908 [1.0] toward the requirements of Item 7 above must complete an approved topic related to the theme of the Concentration.
  3. Students completing the B.A. (Honours) in Law with a Concentration in Law, Policy and Government are encouraged, but not required, to consider completing a Minor in another discipline (e.g. Political Science) to broaden their exposure to that discipline.
  4. The Concentration in Law, Policy and Government is not available to students in the Law - B.A. General program.

Law with Concentration in Law, Policy and Government
B.A. Combined Honours (20.0 credits)

Continuation in this concentration requires a minimum CGPA of 6.50 over credits in the concentration.
The courses defining the Concentration in Law, Policy and Government are those in Items 2, 5, 6, 7 below.

A. Credits Included in the Law Major CGPA (8.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen
3.  1.5 credits from:1.5
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2201 [0.5]
Persons and Property
LAWS 2202 [0.5]
Obligations
LAWS 2301 [0.5]
Criminal Justice System
LAWS 2302 [0.5]
Criminal Law
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law (See Note 1, below)
4.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies I
LAWS 3908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies II
5.  1.5 credits in:1.5
LAWS 3005 [0.5]
Law and Regulation
LAWS 3506 [0.5]
Administrative Law
LAWS 4801 [0.5]
Risk and the Legal Process
6.  0.5 credit from:0.5
LAWS 3106 [0.5]
Sociology of Law
LAWS 3405 [0.5]
Labour Law
LAWS 3500 [0.5]
Constitutional Law
LAWS 3502 [0.5]
Regulating Freedom of Expression in Canada
LAWS 3503 [0.5]
Equality and Discrimination
LAWS 3504 [0.5]
Law and Aboriginal Peoples
LAWS 3509 [0.5]
The Charter of Rights Topics
LAWS 3800 [0.5]
Law of Environmental Quality
7.  1.5 credits from:1.5
LAWS 4006 [0.5]
Religion and State in Canada
LAWS 4101 [0.5]
Contemporary Justice Theories
LAWS 4102 [0.5]
Controversies in Rights Theory
LAWS 4507 [0.5]
Administrative Law and Control
LAWS 4510 [0.5]
Topics in Law, Policy and Government
LAWS 4603 [0.5]
Transitional Justice
LAWS 4607 [0.5]
Immigration and Refugee Law
LAWS 4800 [0.5]
Environment and Social Justice
LAWS 4901 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law
LAWS 4902 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law
LAWS 4908 [1.0]
Honours Paper
B. Additional Requirements (12.0 credits)12.0
8. The requirements for B.A. Combined Honours in the other discipline
9. Sufficient free electives to total 20.0 credits for the program.
Total Credits20.0

Notes:

  1. Law Area Requirement:
    For Item 3 above, students must complete at least:
  2. Students who count LAWS 4901, LAWS 4902 or LAWS 4908 [1.0] toward the requirements of Item 7 above must complete an approved topic related to the theme of the Concentration.
  3. Where the Combined Honours is with the School of Journalism and Communication, the degree awarded will be the Bachelor of Journalism with Law with a Concentration in Law, Policy and Government. Students are directed to the regulations of the School of Journalism and Communication in this Calendar. The Concentration in Law, Policy and Government is not available to students in the Law - B.A. General program.

Law with Concentration in Business Law
B.A. Honours (20.0 credits)

Continuation in this concentration requires a minimum CGPA of 6.50 over credits in the concentration.
The courses defining the Concentration in Business Law are those in Items 2, 5, 6, 7 below.

A. Credits Included in the major CGPA (10.5 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2201 [0.5]
Persons and Property
LAWS 2202 [0.5]
Obligations
3.  1.5 credits in:1.5
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2301 [0.5]
Criminal Justice System
LAWS 2302 [0.5]
Criminal Law
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law (See Note 1, below)
4.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies I
LAWS 3908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies II
5.  1.5 credits in:1.5
LAWS 3003 [0.5]
Contracts
LAWS 3201 [0.5]
Business Enterprise Frameworks
LAWS 3206 [0.5]
Banking Law
6.  1.5 credits from:1.5
LAWS 3202 [0.5]
Intellectual Property
LAWS 3205 [0.5]
Consumer Law
LAWS 3207 [0.5]
International Transactions
LAWS 3208 [0.5]
International Trade Regulation
LAWS 3401 [0.5]
Employment Law
LAWS 3405 [0.5]
Labour Law
7.  2.0 credits from:2.0
LAWS 4200 [0.5]
International Economic Law
LAWS 4202 [0.5]
Accountability of Management
LAWS 4204 [0.5]
Legal Issues in eCommerce
LAWS 4209 [0.5]
Topics in Business Law
LAWS 4302 [0.5]
Regulation of Corporate Crime
LAWS 4402 [0.5]
Employment Dispute Resolution
LAWS 4801 [0.5]
Risk and the Legal Process
LAWS 4901 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law
LAWS 4902 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law
LAWS 4908 [1.0]
Honours Paper
8.  1.0 credit in LAWS at the 4000-level or above1.0
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (9.5 credits)
9.  8.0 credits in electives not in LAWS8.0
10.  1.5 credits in free electives.1.5
Total Credits20.0

Notes:

  1. Law Area Requirement:
    For Item 3 above, students must complete at least:
  2. Students who count LAWS 4901, LAWS 4902 or LAWS 4908 [1.0] toward Item 7 above must complete an approved topic related to the theme of the Concentration;
  3. Students completing the B.A. (Honours) in Law with a Concentration in Business Law are encouraged, but not required, to consider completing a Minor in another discipline (e.g. Business) in order to broaden their exposure to that discipline;
  4. The Concentration in Business Law is not available to students in the Law B.A. General program.

Law with Concentration in Business Law
B.A. Combined Honours (20.0 credits)

Continuation in this concentration requires a minimum CGPA of 6.50 over credits in the concentration.
The courses defining the Concentration in Business Law are those in Items 2, 5, 6 below.

A. Credits Included in the Law Major CGPA (8.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2201 [0.5]
Persons and Property
LAWS 2202 [0.5]
Obligations
3.  1.5 credit from:1.5
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2301 [0.5]
Criminal Justice System
LAWS 2302 [0.5]
Criminal Law
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law (See Note 1, below)
4.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies I
LAWS 3908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies II
5.  1.5 credits in:1.5
LAWS 3003 [0.5]
Contracts
LAWS 3201 [0.5]
Business Enterprise Frameworks
LAWS 3206 [0.5]
Banking Law
6.  2.0 credits from:2.0
LAWS 4200 [0.5]
International Economic Law
LAWS 4202 [0.5]
Accountability of Management
LAWS 4204 [0.5]
Legal Issues in eCommerce
LAWS 4209 [0.5]
Topics in Business Law
LAWS 4302 [0.5]
Regulation of Corporate Crime
LAWS 4402 [0.5]
Employment Dispute Resolution
LAWS 4801 [0.5]
Risk and the Legal Process
LAWS 4901 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law
LAWS 4902 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law
LAWS 4908 [1.0]
Honours Paper
B. Additional Requirements (12.0 credits)12.0
7. The requirements for B.A. combined Honours in the other discipline
8. Sufficient free electives to make up 20.0 credits total for the program.
Total Credits20.0

Notes:

  1. Law Area Requirement:
    For Item 3 above, students must complete at least:
  2. Students counting LAWS 4901, LAWS 4902 or LAWS 4908 [1.0] toward Item 6 above must complete an approved topic related to the theme of the Concentration;
  3. Where the Combined Honours is with the School of Journalism and Communication, the degree awarded will be the Bachelor of Journalism with Law with a Concentration in Business Law. Students are directed to the regulations of the School of Journalism and Communication.

Law with Concentration in Transnational Law and Human Rights
B.A. Honours (20.0 credits)

Continuation in this concentration requires a minimum CGPA of 6.50 over credits in the concentration.
The courses defining the Concentration in Transnational Law and Human Rights are those in Items 2, 5, 6, 7 below.

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (10.5 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law
3.  1.5 credits in:1.5
LAWS 2201 [0.5]
Persons and Property
LAWS 2202 [0.5]
Obligations
LAWS 2301 [0.5]
Criminal Justice System
LAWS 2302 [0.5]
Criminal Law
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen (See Note 1, below)
4.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies I
LAWS 3908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies II
5.  1.5 credits in:1.5
LAWS 3503 [0.5]
Equality and Discrimination
LAWS 3602 [0.5]
International Human Rights
LAWS 4601 [0.5]
Transnational Law and Human Rights
6.  1.5 credits from:1.5
LAWS 3001 [0.5]
Women and the Legal Process
LAWS 3207 [0.5]
International Transactions
LAWS 3208 [0.5]
International Trade Regulation
LAWS 3504 [0.5]
Law and Aboriginal Peoples
LAWS 3509 [0.5]
The Charter of Rights Topics
LAWS 3604 [0.5]
International Organizations
7.  2.0 credits from:2.0
LAWS 4001 [0.5]
Law, Family and Gender
LAWS 4002 [0.5]
Feminist Theories of Law
LAWS 4006 [0.5]
Religion and State in Canada
LAWS 4100 [0.5]
Modern Legal Theory
LAWS 4101 [0.5]
Contemporary Justice Theories
LAWS 4102 [0.5]
Controversies in Rights Theory
LAWS 4105 [0.5]
Global Justice Theory
LAWS 4106 [0.5]
Law and Violence
LAWS 4603 [0.5]
Transitional Justice
LAWS 4605 [0.5]
Topics in International Law
LAWS 4606 [0.5]
International Law of Armed Conflict
LAWS 4607 [0.5]
Immigration and Refugee Law
LAWS 4610 [0.5]
Special Topics in Transnational Law and Human Rights
LAWS 4901 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law
LAWS 4902 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law
LAWS 4908 [1.0]
Honours Paper
8.  0.5 credit in LAWS at the 3000-level or above0.5
9.  0.5 credit in LAWS at the 4000-level0.5
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (9.5 credits)
10.  8.0 credits in electives not in LAWS8.0
11.  1.5 credits in free electives.1.5
Total Credits20.0

Notes:

  1. Law Area Requirement:
    For Item 3 above, students must complete at least:
  2. Students who count LAWS 4901, LAWS 4902 or LAWS 4908 [1.0] toward the requirements of Item 7 above must complete an approved topic related to the theme of the Concentration.
  3. Students completing the B.A. (Honours) in Law with a Concentration in Transnational Law and Human Rights are encouraged, but not required, to consider completing a Minor in another discipline (e.g. Political Science) to broaden their exposure to that discipline.
  4. The Concentration in Transnational Law and Human Rights is not available to students in the Law - B.A. General program.

Law with Concentration in Transnational Law and Human Rights
B.A. Combined Honours (20.0 credits)

Continuation in this concentration requires a minimum CGPA of 6.50 over credits in the concentration.
The courses defining the Concentration in Transnational Law and Human Rights are those in Items 2, 5, 6, 7 below.

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (8.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law
3.  1.5 credits in:1.5
LAWS 2201 [0.5]
Persons and Property
LAWS 2202 [0.5]
Obligations
LAWS 2301 [0.5]
Criminal Justice System
LAWS 2302 [0.5]
Criminal Law
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen (See Note 1, below)
4.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies I
LAWS 3908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies II
5.  1.5 credits in:1.5
LAWS 3503 [0.5]
Equality and Discrimination
LAWS 3602 [0.5]
International Human Rights
LAWS 4601 [0.5]
Transnational Law and Human Rights
6.  1.5 credits from:1.5
LAWS 4001 [0.5]
Law, Family and Gender
LAWS 4002 [0.5]
Feminist Theories of Law
LAWS 4006 [0.5]
Religion and State in Canada
LAWS 4100 [0.5]
Modern Legal Theory
LAWS 4101 [0.5]
Contemporary Justice Theories
LAWS 4102 [0.5]
Controversies in Rights Theory
LAWS 4105 [0.5]
Global Justice Theory
LAWS 4106 [0.5]
Law and Violence
LAWS 4603 [0.5]
Transitional Justice
LAWS 4605 [0.5]
Topics in International Law
LAWS 4606 [0.5]
International Law of Armed Conflict
LAWS 4607 [0.5]
Immigration and Refugee Law
LAWS 4610 [0.5]
Special Topics in Transnational Law and Human Rights
LAWS 4901 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law
LAWS 4902 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law
LAWS 4908 [1.0]
Honours Paper
7.  0.5 credit in LAWS at the 3000-level or above0.5
B. Additional Requirements (12.0 credits)12.0
8. The requirements for B.A. Combined Honours in the other discipline
9. Sufficient free electives to make up 20.0 credits total for the program.
Total Credits20.0

Notes:

  1. Law Area Requirement:
    For Item 3 above, students must complete at least:
  2. Students who count LAWS 4901, LAWS 4902 or LAWS 4908 [1.0] toward the requirements of Item 7 above must complete an approved topic related to the theme of the Concentration.
  3. Where the Combined Honours is with the School of Journalism and Communication, the degree awarded will be the Bachelor of Journalism with Law with a Concentration in Transnational Law and Human Rights. Students are directed to the regulations of the School of Journalism and Communication in this Calendar.
  4. Where the Combined Honours is with the Human Rights program, students are directed to the specific requirements for the Human Rights Combined Honours with Law with Concentration in Transnational Law and Human Rights. Combined Honours students should note that courses required by one major (such as Law) cannot be counted to fulfill the requirements of the second major (such as Human Rights).

Law
B.A. General (15.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (6.5 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
2.  2.0 credits from:2.0
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2201 [0.5]
Persons and Property
LAWS 2202 [0.5]
Obligations
LAWS 2301 [0.5]
Criminal Justice System
LAWS 2302 [0.5]
Criminal Law
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law
3.  0.5 credit in:0.5
LAWS 2908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies I
4.  1.0 credit in LAWS at the 3000-level or above1.0
5.  2.0 credits in LAWS2.0
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (8.5 credits)
6.  5.5 credits in electives not in LAWS6.5
7.  3.0 credits in free electives.2.0
Total Credits15.0

Note: Students with a Major in Law are encouraged, but not required, to consider completing a Minor in another discipline in order to broaden their exposure to that discipline.

Bachelor of Global and International Studies (B.G.In.S.)

Note: Details regarding graduation requirements, the international experience requirement, and the language requirement for the B.G.In.S. degree can be found at the B.G.In.S. program page.

Specialization in Global Law and Social Justice
B.G.In.S. Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (12.0 credits)
1.  4.5 credits in: Core Courses4.5
GINS 1000 [0.5]
Global History
GINS 1010 [0.5]
International Law and Politics
GINS 1020 [0.5]
Ethnography, Globalization and Culture
GINS 2000 [0.5]
Ethics and Globalization
GINS 2010 [0.5]
Globalization and International Economic Issues
GINS 2020 [0.5]
Global Literatures
GINS 3010 [0.5]
Global and International Theory
GINS 3020 [0.5]
Places, Boundaries, Movements and Global Environmental Change
GINS 4090 [0.5]
Honours Seminar in Global and International Studies
2.  7.5 credits in: the Specialization
a. 1.0 credit in: Law Foundations1.0
LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
b. 0.5 credit in: Research Methodologies0.5
LAWS 2908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies I
c. 1.0 credit in: Second Year Core Courses1.0
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
or HUMR 2001 [0.5]
Human Rights: Theories and Foundations
and
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law
d. 0.5 credit from: Third Year Core Courses0.5
LAWS 3602 [0.5]
International Human Rights
LAWS 3604 [0.5]
International Organizations
e. 3.5 credits from: Global Law and Social Justice ( students must select at least 0.5 credit at the 4000 level from this list)3.5
HUMR 3002 [0.5]
Right to the City
HUMR 3301 [0.5]
Racialization, Racism and Human Rights
HUMR 3302 [0.5]
Culture, Religion, and Women's Human Rights
HUMR 3303 [0.5]
Children's Rights
HUMR 3401 [0.5]
Histories of Persecution and Genocide
HUMR 3501 [0.5]
Social, Economic and Cultural Rights
HUMR 3502 [0.5]
Corporations and Human Rights
HUMR 3503 [0.5]
Global Environmental Justice
HUMR 3504 [0.5]
Public Health and Human Rights
HUMR 4201 [0.5]
Citizenship and Human Rights ((if not used in f))
HUMR 4303 [0.5]
Disability Rights ((if not used in f))
HUMR 4401 [0.5]
Gender, Citizenship and Social Justice in a Transnational World ((if not used in f))
HUMR 4402 [0.5]
Terror and Human Rights ((if not used in f))
HUMR 4502 [0.5]
Global Indigenous Knowledges and Movements ((if not used in f))
LAWS 3207 [0.5]
International Transactions
LAWS 3208 [0.5]
International Trade Regulation
LAWS 3503 [0.5]
Equality and Discrimination
LAWS 3504 [0.5]
Law and Aboriginal Peoples
LAWS 3509 [0.5]
The Charter of Rights Topics
LAWS 3602 [0.5]
International Human Rights (if not used in d)
LAWS 3604 [0.5]
International Organizations (if not used in d)
LAWS 4101 [0.5]
Contemporary Justice Theories
LAWS 4102 [0.5]
Controversies in Rights Theory
LAWS 4105 [0.5]
Global Justice Theory (if not used in f)
LAWS 4106 [0.5]
Law and Violence
LAWS 4200 [0.5]
International Economic Law (( if not used in f))
LAWS 4601 [0.5]
Transnational Law and Human Rights (if not used in f)
LAWS 4603 [0.5]
Transitional Justice (( if not used in f))
LAWS 4605 [0.5]
Topics in International Law
LAWS 4606 [0.5]
International Law of Armed Conflict (if not used in f)
LAWS 4607 [0.5]
Immigration and Refugee Law (if not used in f)
LAWS 4610 [0.5]
Special Topics in Transnational Law and Human Rights
LAWS 4901 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law (topic in Global Law and Social Justice)
LAWS 4902 [0.5]
Tutorial in Law (topic in Global Law and Social Justice)
f. 1.0 credit from: Core Honours Seminars and Honours Research Essay1.0
GINS 4908 [1.0]
Honours Research Essay (topic in Global Law and Social Justice)
HUMR 4201 [0.5]
Citizenship and Human Rights
HUMR 4303 [0.5]
Disability Rights
HUMR 4401 [0.5]
Gender, Citizenship and Social Justice in a Transnational World
HUMR 4402 [0.5]
Terror and Human Rights
HUMR 4502 [0.5]
Global Indigenous Knowledges and Movements
LAWS 4105 [0.5]
Global Justice Theory
LAWS 4200 [0.5]
International Economic Law
LAWS 4601 [0.5]
Transnational Law and Human Rights
LAWS 4603 [0.5]
Transitional Justice
LAWS 4606 [0.5]
International Law of Armed Conflict
LAWS 4607 [0.5]
Immigration and Refugee Law
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (8.0 credits)
3.  8.0 credits in: free electives8.0
C. Additional Requirements
4. The International Experience requirement must be met.
5. The Language requirement must be met.
Total Credits20.0

Stream in Global Law and Social Justice
B.G.In.S. General (15.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (8.0 credits)
1.  4.0 credits in: Core Courses4.0
GINS 1000 [0.5]
Global History
GINS 1010 [0.5]
International Law and Politics
GINS 1020 [0.5]
Ethnography, Globalization and Culture
GINS 2000 [0.5]
Ethics and Globalization
GINS 2010 [0.5]
Globalization and International Economic Issues
GINS 2020 [0.5]
Global Literatures
GINS 3010 [0.5]
Global and International Theory
GINS 3020 [0.5]
Places, Boundaries, Movements and Global Environmental Change
2.  4.0 credits from: the Stream4.0
a. Foundations
LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
b. Research Methodologies
LAWS 2908 [0.5]
Approaches in Legal Studies I
c. Second Year Core Courses
HUMR 2001 [0.5]
Human Rights: Theories and Foundations
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law
d. Third Year Core Courses
LAWS 3602 [0.5]
International Human Rights
LAWS 3604 [0.5]
International Organizations
e. Global Law and Social Justice
HUMR 3002 [0.5]
Right to the City
HUMR 3301 [0.5]
Racialization, Racism and Human Rights
HUMR 3302 [0.5]
Culture, Religion, and Women's Human Rights
HUMR 3401 [0.5]
Histories of Persecution and Genocide
HUMR 3501 [0.5]
Social, Economic and Cultural Rights
HUMR 3502 [0.5]
Corporations and Human Rights
HUMR 3503 [0.5]
Global Environmental Justice
HUMR 3504 [0.5]
Public Health and Human Rights
LAWS 3207 [0.5]
International Transactions
LAWS 3208 [0.5]
International Trade Regulation
LAWS 3503 [0.5]
Equality and Discrimination
LAWS 3504 [0.5]
Law and Aboriginal Peoples
LAWS 3509 [0.5]
The Charter of Rights Topics
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (7.0 credits)
3.  7.0 credits in: Free Electives7.0
C. Additional Requirements
4. The language requirement must be met.
Total Credits15.0

Minor in Law (4.0 credits)

The Minor in Law is open to all students registered in undergraduate programs, with the exception of students registered in the B.A. in Law, the B.A. in Criminology and Criminal Justice with a concentration in Law, or the B.G.In.S. Specialization or Stream in Global Law and Social Justice.

Requirements:
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
2.  2.0 credits from:2.0
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2201 [0.5]
Persons and Property
LAWS 2202 [0.5]
Obligations
LAWS 2301 [0.5]
Criminal Justice System
LAWS 2302 [0.5]
Criminal Law
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law
3.  1.0 credit in LAWS at the 3000-level or higher1.0
4. The remaining requirements of the major discipline(s) and degree must be satisfied.
Total Credits4.0

Mention : français : Law (4.0 credits)

Students wishing to qualify for the Mention : français notation in Law may do so by taking the following pattern of courses in their degree program:

Mention : Français Law
1.  1.0 credit in the advanced study of the French language:1.0
FREN 2100 [1.0]
Advanced French
2.  1.0 credit in French-Canadian culture and heritage:1.0
FREN 2201 [1.0]
Introduction aux études littéraires 1
FREN 2401 [1.0]
Fonctionnement d'une langue: le français
3.  1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000- level in law or legal studies taught in French at the university level, and approved by the Undergraduate Supervisor1.0
4. In addition, for B.A. (Honours) Law or Combined B.A. (Honours) Law, 1.0 credit at the 4000-level in law or legal studies taught in French at the university level, and approved by the undergraduate supervisor.1.0
Total Credits4.0

Carleton University/Algonquin College Articulation Agreement
B.A. (Carleton)/Police Foundations (Algonquin) (5.0 credits)

An articulation agreement between Carleton University and Algonquin College of Applied Arts and Technology permits graduates with a Diploma in Police Foundations from Algonquin College to apply for admission into the B.A. program at Carleton University. Successful applicants will be granted 5.0 credits on admission toward the completion of a B.A. in criminology, law, psychology, or sociology.

Course transfers
2.0 credits in Law2.0
2.0 credits in Sociology2.0
0.5 credit in Political Science0.5
0.5 credit in Psychology0.5
Total Credits5.0

To be eligible for admission according to this Articulation Agreement, students must have completed the Diploma in Police Foundations at Algonquin College with an overall B average (Algonquin Grade Point Average of 3.0). They will then be admitted to a B.A. program at Carleton in criminology, law, psychology, or sociology.

Further information may be obtained from the Undergraduate Supervisor or Coordinator of the appropriate B.A. program.

Study Abroad Option - Sheffield Hallam University (5.0 credits)

The Department participates in an International Exchange with the Division of Applied Social Science, Faculty of Development and Society at Sheffield Hallam University in the U.K. The Exchange provides an opportunity for students in the B.A. (Honours) in Law program to study law in a comparative setting within a professional law school firmly rooted in the social scientific study of law. Students accepted into the Exchange select approved courses from the LL.B. (Hons.) syllabus of the Division of Applied Social Science, Faculty of Development and Society at Sheffield Hallam University. Students are eligible to apply to participate in the Exchange for their third or fourth year of study. The minimum requirements for consideration for the Exchange are completion of the following and third-year standing in Law at the time of the Exchange.

LAWS 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Legal Studies
and 2.0 credits from:
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2201 [0.5]
Persons and Property
LAWS 2202 [0.5]
Obligations
LAWS 2301 [0.5]
Criminal Justice System
LAWS 2302 [0.5]
Criminal Law
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law

Students interested in the Exchange should apply to the Department as early as possible, and no later than February 1. Selection will be made by the Department of Law based on the basis of CGPA, overall program performance, and potential for success in the Exchange.

Students who successfully complete 6 units in the LL.B. (Hons.) Law program in the Division of Applied Social Science will receive 5.0 credits towards their B.A. Honours. Interested students should contact the Department.

Law (LAWS) Courses

Note: some graduate courses may also be open to interested fourth-year students with permission of the Department.

LAWS 1000 [1.0 credit]
Introduction to Legal Studies

Concepts, sources, nature and function of law; law and social change; historical and constitutional foundations of the Canadian legal system; common and civil law traditions; statutory interpretation and precedent; legal institutions; the role of judges, lawyers and lay persons; accessibility; alternative dispute resolution.
Lectures and discussion three hours a week.

LAWS 2105 [0.5 credit]
Social Justice and Human Rights

Theories and practices of law and social justice. Issues examined may include: civil democracy and repression; global governance and the rule of law; democratic movements and social power; human rights instruments, regimes and remedies; armed conflict; and humanitarian intervention.
Prerequisite(s): one of LAWS 1000 [1.0], HUMR 1001 [1.0], PAPM 1000 [1.0], PSCI 1100 and PSCI 1200.
Lectures and discussion three hours a week.

LAWS 2201 [0.5 credit]
Persons and Property

Origins and scope of the concept of person in law and how concepts of legal personality change over time. Origins and scope of the concept of property and how concepts of property change over time.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 2003 [1.0] (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 1000.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 2202 [0.5 credit]
Obligations

The concepts employed by the law for creating and enforcing legal obligations between persons within society, including contract, tort, fiduciary obligation and restitution. Consideration is given to the role of persons and the role of the state in ordering private legal obligations.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 2003 [1.0] (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 1000.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 2301 [0.5 credit]
Criminal Justice System

The institutional and social production of criminal law in Canada. Processes, personnel, and agencies in the criminal legal system. The role of discretion and mechanisms of accountability. The accused and the place of the victim. Issues and problems in sentencing and punishment. Theoretical frameworks.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 2004 [1.0] (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 1000.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 2302 [0.5 credit]
Criminal Law

The legal and social dimensions of criminal liability and responsibility in Canada, including issues and problems surrounding mens rea, actus reus, and the attachment of liability. Excuses and justifications, the Canadian Criminal Code and the role of the Charter in the criminal legal system.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 2004 [1.0] (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 1000.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 2501 [0.5 credit]
Law, State and Constitution

Law relating to the state, society and the constitution, with a focus on the historical framework, federalism, and constitutional reform in Canada.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 2005 [1.0] (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 1000 [1.0], PAPM 1000 [1.0], PSCI 1000 [1.0 ] (No longer offered), PSCI 1001 and PSCI 1002 (no longer offered), PSCI 1100 and PSCI1200.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 2502 [0.5 credit]
Law, State and Citizen

Law relating to the state and its relationship to individuals and groups in society, with a focus on the administrative process, basic values and the Charter.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 2005 [1.0] (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from LAWS 1000 [1.0], PAPM 1000 [1.0], PSCI 1100 and PSCI 1200.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 2601 [0.5 credit]
Public International Law

Examination of the role of law in contemporary international relations. Nature, history and sources of international law; international personality of states; the status of international organizations and individuals; creation and effect of international obligations; importance and functions of law in the settlement of international disputes.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 3603 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from LAWS 1000 [1.0], PAPM 1000 [1.0], PSCI 1100 and PSCI 1200.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 2908 [0.5 credit]
Approaches in Legal Studies I

Introduction to interdisciplinary research and analysis in law and legal studies; finding and analyzing primary and secondary legal sources; introduction to the interrelationship between theory, practice and research. Students are strongly encouraged to take this course in the second year of their program.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 3907 [no longer offered].
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 1000.
Lectures and tutorials three hours a week.

LAWS 3001 [0.5 credit]
Women and the Legal Process

How the legal process has affected the status of women. Areas of concentration within the Canadian context include the criminal law, citizenship and immigration, education, employment, and welfare and social services.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3003 [0.5 credit]
Contracts

The enforcement of promises and agreements; basic doctrines and underlying principles of the law of contract are studied from formation of the contract to remedies for breach of contract; role of contract for economic and social purposes is also considered.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2202.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3005 [0.5 credit]
Law and Regulation

Definitions and goals of regulation; contemporary theories and debates about legal and non-legal approaches to regulation. Approaches studied may include market mechanisms, public agency regulation, self-regulation and governance in co-operation with associations in civil society.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from: LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202, LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3006 [0.5 credit]
Mediation

Theory and practice of mediation; historical roots and influences; contrasts with formal litigation and other dispute resolution processes; issues of social and legal control; critiques, including feminist, Marxist and critical race theory; issues of power, gender, race and class; application to contemporary issues and disputes.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 1000 and 1.0 credit from LAWS 2105, LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202, LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302, LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502, LAWS 2601, BUSI 2601.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3101 [0.5 credit]
Philosophy of Law: The Nature of Law

The concept of law, leading theories of law and related concepts such as rules and obligations, power and authority, coercion, and justice.
Precludes additional credit for PHIL 3101.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3102 [0.5 credit]
Philosophy of Law: The Logic of the Law

The nature of legal reasoning and concepts particularly used in the course of legal reasoning such as rights and duties, ownership and possession, liability and punishment.
Also listed as PHIL 3102.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3105 [0.5 credit]
Theory of Law and Politics

Theories of law and politics; prominent thinkers and schools of thought; influence on legal and political institutions. Topics include law and ethics, justice and equity, positivism and natural law, state absolutism, codifications, and anthropological and historical theories of law and society.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from LAWS 2105, LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202, LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302, LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502, LAWS 2601; or 2.0 credits from PSCI 1000 [1.0] (no longer offered), PSCI 1100.

LAWS 3106 [0.5 credit]
Sociology of Law

Development of law in the context of modernity, the West and capitalism. Writings on law by Durkheim, Weber and Marx; their influence on the development of the sociology of law.
Also listed as SOCI 3480.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from LAWS 2105, LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202, LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302, LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502, LAWS 2601.

LAWS 3201 [0.5 credit]
Business Enterprise Frameworks

Forms of carrying on business activity: proprietorships, partnerships, corporations and Crown entities. The rights and obligations of such business enterprises both internally and in relation with other persons. The relationship between legal form and economic function. The role of state intervention.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3202 [0.5 credit]
Intellectual Property

Critical assessment of copyright, patents, trademarks, trade secrets and other forms of intellectual property; regulation and governance of information technology including self-regulation, standard setting, licencing, competition policy and international dimensions.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202, LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3203 [0.5 credit]
The Legal Nature of Property

An examination of the nature and functions of property as a legal and social institution, with particular reference to theories of property, the scope of property interests, and the relationship between individual property rights and the state.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3205 [0.5 credit]
Consumer Law

Need for consumer protection in the provision of goods and services; traditional legal protection by statute and common law; legislative responses to consumer pressures; judicial response in recent Canadian, English and American law; reform of consumer law.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2202 or BUSI 2601.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3206 [0.5 credit]
Banking Law

The law relating to banks and banking; the nature of the legal relationship created; legal rights and duties of the parties involved. Consumer and corporate aspects of banking (including computerization and electronic funds transfers); regulations of banking.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2202 or BUSI 2601.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3207 [0.5 credit]
International Transactions

Topics may include: the international sale of goods, finance of transnational transactions, international carriage of goods, insurance, agency and trading houses; other forms of trade, e.g., counter-trade, foreign investment; settlement of international disputes by litigation and arbitration.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2202 or BUSI 2601.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3208 [0.5 credit]
International Trade Regulation

International regulation of trade and investment through bilateral, regional and multilateral treaties and agreements. Topics may include: WTO, NAFTA, the EU, UNCTAD, intergovernmental commodity agreements, dispute settlement.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2601 or LAWS 2202 or LAWS 2501 or BUSI 2601.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3209 [0.5 credit]
Canadian Correctional Policies in Historical Perspective

History of corrections in Canada in the context of the international evolution of western penal systems, Canadian corrections in the twentieth century and expansion of alternatives to prison after WWII; criminological debates about the theoretical and empirical significance of historical milestones in corrections.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2301 and LAWS 2302.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3303 [0.5 credit]
Torts

Principles of legal liability for harm caused to the person or property of others; examination of policy rationales justifying and limiting liability; responsiveness to changing social values and conditions. Particular focus on negligence law; may also consider nuisance, intentional torts and other topics.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3305 [0.5 credit]
Crime and State in History

The history of the relationship between the criminal law system and society. Changing issues in the criminal law and the nature of institutional responses, covering medieval to early nineteenth-century England and nineteenth to early twentieth-century Canada.
Also listed as HIST 3305.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3306 [0.5 credit]
Crime, Law, Process and Politics

Criminal law process in Canada; structure and use of the process examined for fairness, defects, and possible reform initiatives. Issues concerning gender, race and class bias in the implementation and application of the criminal law.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3307 [0.5 credit]
Youth and Criminal Law

A review of the Youth Criminal Justice Act within the framework of the Canadian justice system, with particular emphasis on historical and philosophical developments and objectives. Current topics include: constitutional issues, procedure, confessions, transfers, sentencing options, alternative measures, reviews, and possible amendments.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3308 [0.5 credit]
Punishment and the Law

This course explores justifications and practices of punishment and social control from a socio-legal perspective. Rationalizations and justifications for punishment are considered. Different forms of punishment and control within the law will be examined as well as different theoretical perspectives of punishment.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2301.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3401 [0.5 credit]
Employment Law

Legal regulation of the employment relationship; its contractual basis; defining employment; rights and duties of employees and employers; termination of employment; statutory regulation through employment standards legislation, human rights codes, workers' compensation acts, occupational health and safety and related statutes.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202, LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502, BUSI 2601.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3405 [0.5 credit]
Labour Law

Role of law in industrial relations; effect of law on collective bargaining relationships; recognition of bargaining agent; regulation of bargaining; administration of the collective agreement; methods of conflict resolution.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202, LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502. Permission may be given to students in Business or Directed Interdisciplinary Studies who have completed BUSI 2601.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3500 [0.5 credit]
Constitutional Law

An investigation of the Canadian constitution. Sovereignty, the nature and units of executive, legislative, and judicial power in Canada as interpreted by the courts. The distribution of powers under the Canadian constitution, including an investigation of contemporary problems of federalism. Problems of judicial review.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2501 or PSCI 2003.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3501 [0.5 credit]
Law in the Information Society

Legal responses to challenges of the information society. Topics may include privacy, surveillance and monitoring, access to information, freedom of expression, control of objectionable content, Charter and human rights issues, and security.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202, LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302, LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3502 [0.5 credit]
Regulating Freedom of Expression in Canada

The claimed relationship between freedom of expression and Canadian democracy, including the historical development of the right and various limits on it, and the regulatory structures governing contemporary media, criminalized and commercial expression, and use of media in the courtroom.
Precludes additional credit for JOUR 3502 and MCOM 3502 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202, LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302, LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3503 [0.5 credit]
Equality and Discrimination

Human rights issues and law in Canada; history and present day experiences of discrimination; critical exploration of law's effectiveness in responding to discrimination; meaning(s) of equality and discrimination; focus on Human Rights Codes - interpretation, administration, enforcement - some reference to s.15 of the Charter.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 3503 [1.0] (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2105 or LAWS 2302 or LAWS 2502.
Lectures and seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 3504 [0.5 credit]
Law and Aboriginal Peoples

The legal situation of aboriginal peoples in Canada. Topics include status, aboriginal rights, treaties, legislative jurisdiction and the constitutional framework, aboriginal claims, and self-government. Comparative references to aboriginal policy in other countries.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2005 [1.0] (no longer offered) or LAWS 2501 or LAWS 2502 or LAWS 3500 or LAWS 3503 or LAWS 3503 [1.0] (no longer offered) or LAWS 3509.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3506 [0.5 credit]
Administrative Law

Structure and procedure of Canadian administrative authorities; policy, statutory and judicial environments in which they operate. Topics include techniques for implementing public policy and structuring public authorities; statutory interpretation; procedural safeguards; exercise of statutory discretion; reconciling efficiency and fairness.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2502 or LAWS 3005.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3508 [0.5 credit]
Health Law

Legal/ethical issues in health care regulation. Topics may include: regulation of health professions; economics of health care; informed consent/choice; regulation of drugs, devices and research; medical malpractice and other liability; mental health issues; patient/client records.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 3505 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202, LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302, LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3509 [0.5 credit]
The Charter of Rights Topics

Selected issues in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The topics of this course may vary from year to year, and are announced in advance of registration.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 3503 [1.0] (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2105 or LAWS 2201 or LAWS 2302 or LAWS 2502.
Lectures and seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 3602 [0.5 credit]
International Human Rights

The developing international law relating to the protection of human rights. General concepts, rules and institutions. Specific issues include self-determination, aboriginal rights, the refugee problem, and torture. The inherent problems and overall potential of international law.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 4604 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from: LAWS 2105, LAWS 2502, LAWS 2601, LAWS 3509.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3604 [0.5 credit]
International Organizations

Nature, character, legal status and jurisdiction of intergovernmental international organizations. Rights and duties of states arising from membership in international organizations. Distinction between international and supra-national institutions. United Nations system, selected subsidiary organs, and specialized agencies; non-governmental organizations at times of crisis.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 4600 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2601.

LAWS 3800 [0.5 credit]
Law of Environmental Quality

Various aspects of environmental law; pollution control, legal actions and remedies; legal foundations for participation in decision-making processes. Social, economic and political forces influencing the formulation and implementation of environmental law. Alternative forms of regulation that may articulate different demands.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202, LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302, LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3804 [0.5 credit]
Law of the Family

Legal framework surrounding the family and family relationships in Canadian society. Topics include marriage and cohabitation, matrimonial support, custody and access, and dissolution of marriage. State interventions through law; law and change in family structures; equality issues; dispute resolution processes.
Also listed as SOWK 3804.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 3804 [1.0] (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3903 [0.5 credit]
Selected Legal Topics

The topics of this course may vary from year to year, and are announced in advance of registration.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3904 [0.5 credit]
Selected Legal Topics

The topics of this course may vary from year to year, and are announced in advance of registration.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3908 [0.5 credit]
Approaches in Legal Studies II

Advanced approaches to interdisciplinary research and analysis in law and legal studies. Emphasis on the important role of theory. Approaches considered will vary by section, and may include theoretical, quantitative, qualitative, literary, or historical approaches. Honours students are strongly encouraged to take this course in the third year of their program.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2908 and third-year Honours standing.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 3999 [0.0 credit]
Co-operative Work Term

Prerequisite(s): registration in the B.A. Honours (concentration in Business Law or concentration in Law, Policy and Government) Cooperative Program, completion of Co-op preparation classes offered by the Co-op office and permission of the Department.


LAWS 4001 [0.5 credit]
Law, Family and Gender

Relationship between family law and ideology of the family, gender roles and the reproduction of family structures. Social ramifications of family law; potential for family law reform as an agency of social change.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and one of LAWS 3001, LAWS 3804.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4002 [0.5 credit]
Feminist Theories of Law

The literature comprising feminist perspectives on law; theoretical bases of these perspectives; place of feminist theories within other critiques of law; significance of different feminist theories for equality theory and law reform strategies; unique contributions of the various perspectives.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 3001 or fourth-year Honours standing.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4006 [0.5 credit]
Religion and State in Canada

Legal nature of the interaction of religion and state within an historical framework. Emphasis on Canada after the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and on religious pluralism and resistance to state intervention in religion. Interdisciplinary readings drawn from legal, historical and theological sources.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 1000.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4100 [0.5 credit]
Modern Legal Theory

Realist and post-realist legal scholarship; emphasis on Canadian, American and British approaches. Topics include the Canadian treatise tradition, American legal realism, empirical approaches to legal problems, the sociological movement in law, critical and Canadian feminist legal scholarship, Marxian theories of law, normative economic theory.
Prerequisite(s): 2.0 credits from LAWS 2105, LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202, LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302, LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4101 [0.5 credit]
Contemporary Justice Theories

Selected major contemporary theories of justice such as those associated with Rawls, Walzer, and Habermas, with emphasis on both their procedural and substantive elements and their concrete ramifications for law, policy and political practice.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4102 [0.5 credit]
Controversies in Rights Theory

Selected controversies in rights theories and practices. Illustrative questions may include: Are human rights culturally relative? Can rights be justified after the demise of natural rights philosophy? Do rights undermine "difference"? Do communities benefit from a rights-based culture? Are "rights" forms of governance?.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 3503 [1.0] (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4103 [0.5 credit]
Special Topic in the Philosophy of Law

Detailed study of a special topic in philosophy of law.
Also listed as PHIL 4407.
Prerequisite(s): eligibility for fourth-year standing in a Law or Philosophy Honours program or permission of either Department.
Seminar two hours a week.

LAWS 4104 [0.5 credit]
Special Topic in the Philosophy of Law

Detailed study of a special topic in philosophy of law.
Also listed as PHIL 4408.
Prerequisite(s): eligibility for fourth-year standing in a Law or Philosophy Honours program or permission of either Department.
Seminar two hours a week.

LAWS 4105 [0.5 credit]
Global Justice Theory

Selected theories of global justice as they pertain to legality, which may include questions such as the justice of military force and just war theory, global social justice and global inequality, sovereignty and cosmopolitan conceptions of justice, demands for global democracy and human rights.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and one of LAWS 2105, PHIL 2103, PSCI 3307.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4106 [0.5 credit]
Law and Violence

Examination of how law defines, justifies, and addresses individual, collective and state violence: contemporary and historical case studies; theoretical inquiries into the relationship between law, legality and different forms of violence.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

LAWS 4107 [0.5 credit]
Law in Modern Society

Sociological and legal theory accounts of the changing role and function of law in modern society with particular reference to advanced capitalist societies. Topics include: the welfare state and the use of regulatory law; juridification and legalization; counter-trends, deregulation, informalism, legal pluralism.
Also listed as SOCI 4303.
Prerequisite(s): one of LAWS 3101, LAWS 3105, LAWS 3106, or SOCI 3801.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4200 [0.5 credit]
International Economic Law

Selected topics in international economic law. May include: the legal regulation of international economic activity; methods of dispute settlement; standardization and development of an autonomous international trade law; and selected conventions and institutions governing international economic law.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 3207 or LAWS 3208.
Seminar three hours a week.

LAWS 4202 [0.5 credit]
Accountability of Management

Role, function, and legal regulation of persons managing business enterprises. Status, social responsibility, fiduciary obligations and rights. Control and accountability of managers, obligations owed to the enterprise unit itself, constitutional rights of members, standards imposed by statutory regulation.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 3201.
Lectures three hours a week.

LAWS 4204 [0.5 credit]
Legal Issues in eCommerce

An examination of selected legal topics relevant to the conduct of electronic commerce. Topics include types of regulation, government support, jurisdiction challenges, contract disputes and consumer protection. Court and alternative dispute resolution policy of Domain Names challenges are also included.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202.
Lectures and discussions three hours a week.

LAWS 4209 [0.5 credit]
Topics in Business Law

Examination of a selected advanced topic in business law. The topics of this course may vary from year to year and are announced in advance of registration.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and one of LAWS 2201, LAWS 2202.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4302 [0.5 credit]
Regulation of Corporate Crime

Legal, policy and theoretical perspectives on the regulation of corporate crime. Nature and causes of corporate crime. Selected case studies on the role of the state in regulating corporate behaviour. Failure of the criminal justice system to respond to corporate crime.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2302, and one of LAWS 3005, LAWS 3201, LAWS 3800.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4303 [0.5 credit]
Drugs, The User and The State

This course explores the state's attempts to control drugs and drug users by exploring different aspects of national and international drug control. The Canadian experience of drug control, viewed from different perspectives, will be explored within a broader socio-legal context.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and one of LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302.

LAWS 4304 [0.5 credit]
Policing and Social Surveillance

A wide-ranging theoretical consideration of the emergence and transformation of “policing” activities through an examination of law and changes in social relations, with special attention to the myriad agencies involved in contemporary security provision. Evolving notions of risk, surveillance, the state, and the private-public dichotomy.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and one of LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4305 [0.5 credit]
Criminal Justice Reform

Social transformation and criminal justice reform. Theoretical and practical reasons for the use of criminal law as an instrument of social control. Specific reform initiatives and processes. Alternate responses to social problems.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and LAWS 2301 and LAWS 2302.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4306 [0.5 credit]
Criminal Law Issues

Selected issues and problems in the area of criminal law. The topics may vary from year to year depending on demand and interest and are announced in advance of registration.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302.

LAWS 4307 [0.5 credit]
Medical Criminal Law Issues

Legal-medical issues, conflicts and relationships in the field of social control. Topics include mental disorder and criminal liability, diversion of offenders to civil commitment in hospital, insanity, automatism, fitness to stand trial, prediction of dangerousness, regulation of psychoactive drugs.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4308 [0.5 credit]
Sentencing

Theories of sentencing, current sentencing laws and practices, perceptions of sentencing. Data on sentencing practice across Canada. Reforms in other jurisdictions. Critical review of the Canadian Sentencing Commission. Multidisciplinary approach using research and theory in law, criminology, social psychology and sociology.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302. This course may not be taken by students who have completed the course as a special topics course.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4309 [0.5 credit]
State Security and Dissent

Historical and contemporary analysis of legal responses of Canadian governments to dissent, political opposition, insurrection, etc. Includes trial of political offences (treason, sedition, riot), national security measures (War Measures/Emergencies Act, Official Secrets Act), and other special powers (police, labour, immigration, parliamentary privilege, etc.).
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and one of LAWS 3305, LAWS 3503, or LAWS 3509 or HIST 3305.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4311 [0.5 credit]
Human Rights in Canadian Prisons

Correctional law in the Canadian criminal justice system; competing objectives of punishment and rehabilitation in the context of respect for the rule of law and human rights; protection of human rights of prisoners in Canada and in in international and comparative contexts.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

LAWS 4402 [0.5 credit]
Employment Dispute Resolution

Theory and practice of dispute resolution in employment relations; analysis of such techniques as negotiation, grievance and interest arbitration, mediation, investigation and litigation applied to a range of employment disputes such as collective agreements, termination of employment, discrimination, harassment, occupational health and safety,.
Precludes additional credit for LAWS 4400.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and one of LAWS 3006, LAWS 3401, LAWS 3405.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4504 [0.5 credit]
Aboriginal Criminal Justice

Aboriginal peoples and the administration of Canadian criminal justice including policing, courts, corrections and aftercare. Content and effects of past and present policies, processes and laws. Alternatives such as self-government and self-determination; potential approaches to an appropriate justice system for Aboriginal peoples.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4507 [0.5 credit]
Administrative Law and Control

Examination of characteristics and selected problems of control of administrative action. Topics include: varieties of traditional and constitutional, legal and judicial control, impact of the Charter, reforms to administrative law control systems in Canada, and comparisons with developments outside Canada.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2501 and LAWS 2502, or LAWS 3005 or LAWS 3506 or PADM 5413.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as PADM 5307, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4510 [0.5 credit]
Topics in Law, Policy and Government

Examination of a selected advanced topic in the area of law, policy and government. The topics of this course may vary from year to year and are announced in advance of registration.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and LAWS 2501, LAWS 2502.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4601 [0.5 credit]
Transnational Law and Human Rights

Examination of the role of law in addressing human rights issues that transcend traditional categories of domestic and international law; the potential and limits of law in addressing human rights issues; the growth of transnational approaches to law and human rights.
Prerequisite(s): one of LAWS 3503,LAWS 3602, and LAWS 4604 (no longer offered).
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4603 [0.5 credit]
Transitional Justice

Legal and ethical responses to human rights violations in the transition to democracy. Topics include: dilemmas of the rule of law; truth and reconciliation; prosecution and punishment; amnesty; retribution and revenge; restorative justice; administrative remedy; reparations. Theoretical arguments about justice in context of country and international case studies.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4605 [0.5 credit]
Topics in International Law

Topics vary from year to year and are announced in advance. May include transnational environmental issues; the international law of armed conflict, peacekeeping and neutrality; the law of international treaties and transnational agreements; state responsibility under international law.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year honours standing and LAWS 2601.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4606 [0.5 credit]
International Law of Armed Conflict

UN Charter prohibition of the use of force. Exceptional, permissible uses of armed force. Role of Security Council in determining legality of armed intervention. Collective security, peacemaking, peacekeeping, neutrality, prohibited means of warfare. Humanitarian International Law. The Geneva Red Cross Conventions, war crimes, the role of International Criminal Court.
Prerequisite(s): fourth year honours standing and LAWS 2601.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4607 [0.5 credit]
Immigration and Refugee Law

Immigrants and refugees; demographics; Canadian, international and human rights law and policy. The Canadian Immigration Act. Legal and social problems including entry and removal, family reunion, citizenship, remedies, the rights of clandestine migrants; settlement rights; non-discrimination; asylum; a nation's right to determine membership.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2502.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4610 [0.5 credit]
Special Topics in Transnational Law and Human Rights

Examination of a selected advanced topic in the area of transnational law and human rights. The topics of this course may vary from year to year and are announced in advance of registration.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing and LAWS 2105, LAWS 2502, and LAWS 2601.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4701 [0.5 credit]
Special Topic in Criminal Justice and Social Policy

Examination of a selected topic in criminal justice and social policy. Topics to be announced well in advance of registration each year. This course is part of the Summer School in Criminal Justice and Social Policy and is offered by the Department of Law.
Also listed as SOWK 4701, SOCI 4701.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Department.


LAWS 4702 [0.5 credit]
Special Topic in Criminal Justice and Social Policy

Examination of a selected topic in criminal justice and social policy. Topics to be announced well in advance of registration each year. This course is part of the Summer School in Criminal Justice and Social Policy and is offered by the Department of Sociology and Anthropology.
Also listed as SOWK 4702 and SOCI 4702.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Department.

LAWS 4703 [0.5 credit]
Special Topic in Criminal Justice and Social Policy

Examination of a selected topic in criminal justice and social policy. Topics to be announced well in advance of registration each year. This course is part of the Summer School in Criminal Justice and Social Policy and is offered by the School of Social Work.
Also listed as SOWK 4703, SOCI 4703.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Department.


LAWS 4800 [0.5 credit]
Environment and Social Justice

The potential of environmental law to protect the environment and people while promoting opportunities for informed participation in environmental decision making by groups traditionally excluded from these processes; contemporary issues of social justice raised by legal regulation of the environment.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4801 [0.5 credit]
Risk and the Legal Process

Application of risk assessment and management in various legal arenas including insurance, liability and tort, litigation management, environmental protection, and sentencing and parole.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4802 [0.5 credit]
Criminal Jury Trials

Critical analysis of the criminal jury system including its history and context, the role of the judge, jury dynamics and jury composition. Perspectives and roles of the accused, victims, police, defence counsel, Crown attorney, judges, juries, media, politicians and the public.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2301 and LAWS 2302.
Seminars three hours a week.

LAWS 4901 [0.5 credit]
Tutorial in Law

Tutorials or reading courses on selected topics in which seminars are not available. Guidelines are posted by the Department.
Prerequisite(s): written acceptance by a faculty member and permission of the Department.

LAWS 4902 [0.5 credit]
Tutorial in Law

Tutorials or reading courses on selected topics in which seminars are not available. Guidelines are posted by the Department.
Prerequisite(s): written acceptance by a faculty member and permission of the Department.

LAWS 4903 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Legal Topics

The topics of this course may vary from year to year, and are announced in advance of registration.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing.

LAWS 4904 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Legal Topics

The topics of this course may vary from year to year and are announced well in advance of the period of registration.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing.

LAWS 4905 [1.0 credit]
Full-Year Service Learning Placement

This course gives students the opportunity to contribute to an organization whose focus relates to law. Participating students must identify a host organization and a faculty member to provide supervision. Students will produce a paper on their placement experience.
Prerequisite(s): Minimum of fourth year standing in Law with a law GPA of 9.00 or better and permission of the Undergraduate Supervisor, and written acceptance by a faculty member.

LAWS 4906 [0.5 credit]
Service Learning Placement

This course gives students the opportunity to contribute to an organization whose focus relates to Law. Participating students must identify a host organization and a faculty member to provide supervision. Students will produce a paper on their placement experience.
Prerequisite(s): minimum of fourth year standing in Law with a Law GPA of 9.00 or higher and permission of the Undergraduate Supervisor, and written acceptance by a faculty member.

LAWS 4908 [1.0 credit]
Honours Paper

Students in the BA (Honours) Law or BA Combined (Honours) Law Program may write an Honours paper during their final year under the supervision of a faculty member of the Department of Law. The Honours Paper is evaluated by both the supervisor and a second reader. Students intending to proceed to graduate studies are encouraged to complete an Honours paper.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing in Law with a law GPA of 9.00 or better or permission of the Undergraduate Supervisor, and written acceptance by a faculty member.

Summer session: some of the courses listed in this Calendar are offered during the summer. Hours and scheduling for summer session courses will differ significantly from those reported in the fall/winter Calendar. To determine the scheduling and hours for summer session classes, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Not all courses listed are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for the current session and to determine the term of offering, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Regulations (B.A.)

The regulations presented below apply to all Bachelor of Arts programs. In addition to the requirements presented here, students must satisfy the University regulations common to all undergraduate students including the process of Academic Performance Evaluation (consult the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar).

First-Year Seminars

B.A. degree students are strongly encouraged to include a First-Year Seminar (FYSM) during their first 4.0 credits of registration. Students are limited to 1.0 credit in FYSM and can only register in a FYSM while they have first-year standing in their B.A. program. Students who have completed the Enriched Support Program (ESP) or who are required to take a minimum of one English as a Second Language (ESLA) credit are not permitted to register in a FYSM.

Breadth Requirement

Among the credits presented at graduation, students in both the B.A. General and the B.A. Honours degrees and B.Co.M.S. are required to include 3.0 breadth credits, including 1.0 credit from each of three of the four Breadth Areas identified below. Credits that fulfil requirements in the Major, Minor, Concentration or Specialization may be used to fulfil the Breadth Requirement.

Students admitted with a completed university degree are exempt from breadth requirements.

Students in the following interdisciplinary programs are exempt from the B.A. breadth requirement.

  • African Studies
  • Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • Environmental Studies
  • Human Rights
Breadth Area 1: Culture and Communication

American Sign Language, Art History, Art and Culture, Communication and Media Studies, Comparative Literary Studies, Digital Humanities, English, Film Studies, French, Journalism, Music, and Languages (Arabic, English as a Second Language, German, Greek, Hebrew, Indigenous Languages, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish)

Subject codes: ARAB, ARTH, ASLA, CHIN, CLST, COMS, DIGH, ENGL, ESLA, FILM, FINS, FREN, GERM, GREK, HEBR, ITAL, JAPA, JOUR, LANG, LATN, MUSI, PORT, RUSS, SPAN

Breadth Area 2: Humanities

African Studies, Applied Linguistics and Discourse Studies, Canadian Studies, Child Studies, Classical Civilization, Directed Interdisciplinary Studies, Disability Studies, European and Russian Studies, History, Human Rights, Humanities, Indigenous Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Linguistics, Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Philosophy, Religion, Sexuality Studies, South Asian Studies, and Women's and Gender Studies.

Subject codes: AFRI, ALDS, CDNS, CHST, CLCV, DBST, DIST, EURR, HIST, HUMR, HUMS, INDG, LACS, LING, MEMS, PHIL, RELI, SAST, SXST, WGST

Breadth Area 3: Science, Engineering, and Design

Architecture, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Engineering, Environmental Science, Food Science and Nutrition, Health Sciences, Industrial Design, Mathematics, Neuroscience, Statistics, Physics, and Technology, Society, Environment.

Subject codes: AERO, ARCC, ARCH, ARCN, ARCS, ARCU, BIOC, BIOL, CHEM, CIVE, CMPS, COMP, ECOR, ELEC, ENSC, ENVE, ERTH, FOOD, HLTH, IDES, ISCI, ISCS, ISYS, MAAE, MATH, MECH, NEUR, NSCI, PHYS, SREE, STAT, SYSC, TSES

Breadth Area 4: Social Sciences

Anthropology, Business, Cognitive Science, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Economics, Environmental Studies, Geography, Geomatics, Global and International Studies, Global Politics, Interdisciplinary Public Affairs, International Affairs, Law, Migration and Diaspora Studies, Political Management, Political Science, Psychology, Public Administration, Public Affairs and Policy Management, Social Work, Sociology/Anthropology, Sociology

Subject codes: ANTH, BUSI, CGSC, CRCJ, ECON, ENST, GEOG, GEOM, GINS, GPOL, INAF, IPAF, LAWS, MGDS, PADM, PAPM, POLM, PSCI, PSYC, SOCI, SOWK

Declared and Undeclared Students

Students who are registered in a program within the degree are called Declared students. Most students designate a program of study when they first apply for admission and so begin their studies as Declared students. Students may also choose to begin their studies within the B.A. degree without being registered in a program. These students are referred to as Undeclared. The recommended course pattern for Undeclared students is outlined under Undeclared in the Programs section of this Calendar. Undeclared students must apply to enter a program before beginning their second year of study. The Student Academic Success Centre offers support to Undeclared students in making this decision.

Change of Program Within the B.A. Degree

Students may transfer to a program within the B.A. degree, if upon entry to the new program they would be in Good Standing . Other applications for change of program will be considered on their merits; students may be admitted to the new program in Good Standing or on Academic Warning. Students may apply to declare or change their program within the B.A. Degree at the Registrar's Office according to the published deadlines. Acceptance into a program or into a program element or option is subject to any enrollment limitations, specific program, program element or option requirements, as published in the relevant Calendar entry.

Minors, Concentrations and Specializations

Students may apply to the Registrar's Office to be admitted to a minor, concentration or specialization during their first or subsequent years of study. Acceptance into a minor, concentration or specialization is subject to any specific requirements of the intended Minor, Concentration or Specialization as published in the relevant Calendar entry. Acceptance into a Concentration or Specialization requires that the student be in Good Standing.

Mention : Français

Students registered in certain B.A. programs may earn the notation Mention : Français by completing part of their requirements in French and by demonstrating a knowledge of the history and culture of French Canada. The general requirements are listed below. For more specific details consult the departmental program entries.

Students in a B.A. Honours program must present:

  1. 1.0 credit in French language;
  2. 1.0 credit devoted to the history and culture of French Canada;
  3. 1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level and 1.0 credit at the 4000-level in the Honours discipline taken in French.

Students in a B.A. General program must present:

  1. 1.0 credit in advanced French;
  2. 1.0 credit devoted to the history and culture of French Canada;
  3. 1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level in the Major discipline taken in French.

Students in Combined Honours programs must fulfil the Mention : Français requirement in both disciplines.

Courses taught in French (Item 3, above) may be taken at Carleton, at the University of Ottawa on the Exchange Agreement, or at a francophone university on a Letter of Permission. Students planning to take courses on exchange or on a Letter of Permission should take careful note of the residence requirement for a minimum number of Carleton courses in their programs. Consult the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar for information regarding study on Exchange or Letter of Permission.

Co-operative Education

For more information about how to apply for the Co-op program and how the Co-op program works please visit the Co-op website.

All students participating in the Co-op program are governed by the Undergraduate Co-operative Education Policy.

Undergraduate Co-operative Education Policy

Admission Requirements

Students can apply to co-op in one of two ways; directly from high school or after beginning a degree program at Carleton.

If a student is admitted to co-op from high school, their grades will be reviewed two terms to one year prior to their first work term to ensure they continue to meet the academic requirements after their 1st or 2nd year of study. The time at which evaluation takes place depends on the program of study. Students will automatically be notified via their Carleton email account if they are permitted to continue.

Students not admitted to Carleton University with the co-op option on their degree can apply for admission via the co-operative education program website. To view application deadlines, visit carleton.ca/co-op.

Admission to the co-op option is based on the completion of 5.0 or more credits at Carleton University, the CGPA requirement for the students' academic program as well as any course prerequisites. The articulated CGPA for each program is the normal standard for assessment. Please see the specific degree program sections for the unique admission and continuation requirements for each academic program.

English Language Proficiency

Students admitted to Carleton based on CAEL, IELTS or TOEFL assessments and who are required to take an ESL course must take and pass the Oral Proficiency in Communicative Settings (OPECS) Test. The test must be taken before being permitted to register in COOP 1000. Admission to the co-op program can be confirmed with a minimum score of 4+.

Participation Requirements

COOP 1000

Once a student has been given admission or continuation confirmation to the co-op option s/he must complete and pass COOP 1000 (a mandatory online 0.0 credit course). Students will have access to this course a minimum of two terms prior to their first work term and will be notified when to register.

Communication with the Co-op Office

Students must maintain contact with the co-op office during their job search and while on a work term. All email communication will be conducted via the students' Carleton email account.

Employment

Although every effort is made to ensure a sufficient number of job postings for all students enrolled in the co-op option of their degree program, no guarantee of employment can be made. Carleton's co-op program operates a competitive job search process and is dependent upon current market conditions. Academic performance, skills, motivation, maturity, attitude and potential will determine whether a student is offered a job. It is the student's responsibility to actively conduct a  job search in addition to participation in the job search process operated by the co-op office. Once a student accepts a co-op job offer (verbally or written), his/her job search will end and access to co-op jobs will be removed for that term. Students that do not successfully obtain a co-op work term are expected to continue with their academic studies. The summer term is the exception to this rule. Students should also note that hiring priority is given to Canadian citizens for co-op positions in the Federal Government of Canada.

Registering in Co-op Courses

Students will be registered in a Co-op Work Term course while at work. The number of Co-op Work Term courses that a student is registered in is dependent upon the number of four-month work terms that a student accepts.

While on a co-op work term students may take a maximum of 0.5 credit throughout each four-month co-op work term. Courses must be scheduled outside of regular working hours.

Students must be registered as full-time before they begin their co-op job search (2.0 credits). All co-op work terms must be completed before the beginning of the final academic term. Students may not finish their degree on a co-op work term.

Work Term Assessment and Evaluation

To obtain a Satisfactory grade for the co-op work term students must have:

  1. A satisfactory work term evaluation by the co-op employer;
  2. A satisfactory grade on the work term report.

Students must submit a work term report at the completion of each four-month work term. Reports are due on the 16th of April, August, and December and students are notified of due dates through their Carleton email account.

Workplace performance will be assessed by the workplace supervisor. Should a student receive an unsatisfactory rating from their co-op employer, an investigation by the co-op program manager will be undertaken. An unsatisfactory employer evaluation does not preclude a student from achieving an overall satisfactory rating for the work term.

Graduation with the Co-op Designation

In order to graduate with the co-op designation, students must satisfy all requirements for their degree program in addition to the requirements according to each co-op program (i.e. successful completion of three or four work terms).

Note: Participation in the co-op option will add up to one additional year for a student to complete their degree program.

Voluntary Withdrawal from the Co-op Option

Students may withdraw from the co-op option of their degree program during a study term ONLY. Students at work may not withdraw from the work term or the co-op option until s/he has completed the requirements of the work term.

Students are eligible to continue in their regular academic program provided that they meet the academic standards required for continuation.

Involuntary or Required Withdrawal from the Co-op Option

Students may be required to withdraw from the co-op option of their degree program for one or any of the following reasons:

  1. Failure to achieve a grade of SAT in COOP 1000
  2. Failure to pay all co-op related fees
  3. Failure to actively participate in the job search process
  4. Failure to attend all interviews for positions to which the student has applied
  5. Declining more than one job offer during the job search process
  6. Continuing a job search after accepting a co-op position
  7. Dismissal from a work term by the co-op employer
  8. Leaving a work term without approval by the Co-op manager
  9. Receipt of an unsatisfactory work term evaluation
  10. Submission of an unsatisfactory work term report

Standing and Appeals

The Co-op and Career Services office administers the regulations and procedures that are applicable to all co-op program options. All instances of a student's failure during a work term or other issues directly related to their participation in the co-op option will be reported to the academic department.

Any decision made by the Co-op and Career Services office can be appealed via the normal appeal process within the University.

International Students

All International Students are required to possess a Co-op Work Permit issued by Citizenship and Immigration Canada before they can begin working. It is illegal to work in Canada without the proper authorization. Students will be provided with a letter of support to accompany their application. Students must submit their application for their permit before being permitted to view and apply for jobs on the Co-op Services database. Confirmation of a position will not be approved until a student can confirm they have received their permit. Students are advised to discuss the application process and requirements with the International Student Services Office.

B.A. Honours Law (Concentration in Business Law, or Law, Policy and Government): Co-op Admission and Continuation Requirements

  • Maintain full-time status in each study term (2.0 credits);
  • Be eligible to work in Canada (for off-campus work)
  • Have successfully completed COOP 1000 [0.0]

In addition to the following:

  1. Registered as a full-time student in the Bachelor of Arts Honours - Law (Business law Concentration or Laws, Policy and Government Concentration) program;
  2. Obtained an overall CGPA of 8.00 if applying to do their first work term in the summer following the second year of study;
  3. Obtained and maintained an overall CGPA of 6.5 and a major CGPA of 8.0, for the purposes of entry to any work term following completion of the third year of study;
  4. Completed 3.5 credits in law, includingLAWS 2908, prior to their first work term. It is strongly recommended that students complete all first and second year law requirements prior to entering their first work term.

Students in B.A. Honours Law (Concentration in Business Law, or Law, Policy and Government) must successfully complete three (3) work terms to obtain the Co-op designation.

Co-operative Work Term CourseLAWS 3999
Work/Study Pattern:

Year 1Year 2Year 3Year 4Year 5
TermPatternTermPatternTermPatternTermPatternTermPattern
FallSFallSFallSFallSFallS
WinterSWinterSWinterSWinterWWinter 
Summer SummerWSummerWSummerW

Legend
S
: Study
W: Work
O: Optional
* indicates recommended work study pattern
** student finds own employer for this work-term.

Admissions Information

Admission Requirements are for the 2017-2018 year only, and are based on the Ontario High School System. Holding the minimum admission requirements only establishes eligibility for consideration. The cut-off averages for admission may be considerably higher than the minimum. See also the General Admission and Procedures section of this Calendar. An overall average of at least 70% is normally required to be considered for admission. Some programs may also require specific course prerequisites and prerequisite averages and/or supplementary admission portfolios. Higher averages are required for admission to programs for which the demand for places by qualified applicants exceeds the number of places available. The overall average required for admission is determined each year on a program by program basis. Consult admissions.carleton.ca for further details.

Admission Requirements

Degrees

  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)(Honours)
  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)(General)

First Year

For B.A. (General) and B.A. (Honours)
The Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent including a minimum of six 4U or M courses. The six 4U or M courses must include a 4U course in English (or anglais ). For applicants whose first language is not English, the requirement of English can also be met under the conditions outlined in the section “English Language Requirements” in the Admissions Requirements and Procedures section of this Calendar.

The cut-off average for admission will be set annually and will normally be above the minimum requirement. Applicants falling slightly below the cut-off average will be considered on an individual basis to determine whether there are special circumstances that would permit their admission. Students who feel that their high school grade average does not reflect their potential may apply to the Enriched Support Program (see the Enriched Support Program section of this Calendar).

Articulation Agreements

For B.A. (Carleton)/Police Foundations (Algonquin)
To be eligible for admission pursuant to this Articulation Agreement, students must have completed the Diploma in Police Foundations at Algonquin College with an overall B average (CGPA of 3.0). They will then be considered for admission to a B.A. program at Carleton in one of Criminology, Law, Psychology, or Sociology.

Advanced Standing

B.A. (General and Honours) Program

Applications for admission to the second or subsequent years will be assessed on their merits. Advanced standing will be granted only for those courses that are determined to be appropriate.

Articulation Agreements

B.A. (Carleton)/Police Foundations (Algonquin)
Students who have obtained a Diploma in Police Foundations from Algonquin College with an overall average of B or higher will be granted up to a maximum of 5.0 credits on admission towards the completion of a B.A. in either Criminology, Law, Psychology, or Sociology.

Direct Admission to the First Year of the Co-op Option

Anthropology and Sociology, Communication and Media Studies, English, European and Russian Studies, French, History, Law, Political Science, Psychology

Applicants must:

  1. meet the required overall admission cut-off average and prerequisite course average. These averages may be higher than the stated minimum requirements;
  2. be registered as a full-time student in the Bachelor of Arts Honours with one of the majors listed above;
  3. be eligible to work in Canada (for off-campus work placements).

Meeting the above requirements only establishes eligibility for admission to the program. The prevailing job market may limit enrolment in the co-op option. Students should also note that hiring priority is given to Canadian citizens for co-op positions in the Public Service Commission.

Note: continuation requirements for students previously admitted to the co-op option and admission requirements for the co-op option after beginning the program are described in the Co-operative Education Regulations section of this Calendar.