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School of Linguistics and Language Studies
(Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences)
613-520-6612
http://carleton.ca/slals

This section presents the requirements for programs in:

B.Sc. Honours in Linguistics
with a Concentration in Linguistic Theory (Neuroscience) (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (9.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
ALDS 1001 [0.5]
Language Matters: Introduction to ALDS
LING 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to Linguistics I
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LING 2005 [0.5]
Linguistic Analysis
LING 2007 [0.5]
Phonetics
3.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LING 3004 [0.5]
Syntax I
LING 3007 [0.5]
Phonology I
4.  1.0 credit in LING at the 4000 level1.0
5.  1.5 credits in LING, excluding LING 11001.5
6.  3.5 credits from the Concentration:3.5
a. 1.0 credit in:
LING 3005 [0.5]
Morphology I
LING 3505 [0.5]
Semantics
b. 1.0 credit from:
LING 4004 [0.5]
Syntax II
LING 4005 [0.5]
Morphology II
LING 4007 [0.5]
Phonology II
LING 4505 [0.5]
Formal Semantics
LING 4510 [0.5]
Lexical Semantics
c. 1.5 credits in LING, excluding LING 1100
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (11.0 credits)
7.  3.5 credits in Neuroscience3.5
a. 2.0 credits in:
NEUR 1202 [0.5]
Neuroscience of Mental Health and Psychiatric Disease
NEUR 1203 [0.5]
Neuroscience of Mental Health and Neurological Disease
NEUR 2001 [0.5]
Introduction to Research Methods in Neuroscience
NEUR 2002 [0.5]
Introduction to Statistics in Neuroscience
b. 1.5 credits from:
NEUR 2201 [0.5]
Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
NEUR 2202 [0.5]
Neurodevelopment and Plasticity
NEUR 3206 [0.5]
Sensory and Motor Neuroscience
NEUR 3207 [0.5]
Integrative Neuroscience
NEUR 3303 [0.5]
The Neuroscience of Consciousness
8.  1.5 credits in:1.5
BIOL 1103 [0.5]
Foundations of Biology I
BIOL 1104 [0.5]
Foundations of Biology II
BIOL 3306 [0.5]
Human Anatomy and Physiology
9.  1.0 credit from:1.0
CHEM 1001 [0.5]
& CHEM 1002 [0.5]
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
CHEM 1005 [0.5]
& CHEM 1006 [0.5]
Elementary Chemistry I
Elementary Chemistry II
10.  1.0 credit in:1.0
MATH 1007 [0.5]
Elementary Calculus I
MATH 1107 [0.5]
Linear Algebra I
11.  4.0 credits in free electives4.0
C. Additional Requirements
12. School Language Proficiency Requirement must be satisfied
Total Credits20.0

B.Sc. Honours in Linguistics
with a Concentration in Linguistic Theory (Psychology) (20.0 credits)

A. Credits included in the Major CGPA (9.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
ALDS 1001 [0.5]
Language Matters: Introduction to ALDS
LING 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to Linguistics I
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LING 2005 [0.5]
Linguistic Analysis
LING 2007 [0.5]
Phonetics
3.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LING 3004 [0.5]
Syntax I
LING 3007 [0.5]
Phonology I
4.  1.0 credit in LING at the 4000 level1.0
5.  1.5 credits in LING, excluding LING 11001.5
6.  3.5 credits from the Concentration:3.5
a. 1.0 credit in:
LING 3005 [0.5]
Morphology I
LING 3505 [0.5]
Semantics
b. 1.0 credit from:
LING 4004 [0.5]
Syntax II
LING 4005 [0.5]
Morphology II
LING 4007 [0.5]
Phonology II
LING 4505 [0.5]
Formal Semantics
LING 4510 [0.5]
Lexical Semantics
c. 1.5 credits in LING (excluding LING 1100)
B. Credits Not Included inthe Major CGPA (11.0 credits)
7.  3.5 credits in Psychology:3.5
a. 2.0 credits in:
PSYC 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to Psychology I
PSYC 1002 [0.5]
Introduction to Psychology II
PSYC 2001 [0.5]
Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology
PSYC 2002 [0.5]
Introduction to Statistics in Psychology
b. 1.5 credits from:
PSYC 2307 [0.5]
Human Neuropsychology I
PSYC 2700 [0.5]
Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
PSYC 3307 [0.5]
Human Neuropsychology II
PSYC 3506 [0.5]
Cognitive Development
PSYC 3702 [0.5]
Perception
8.  1.5 credits in:1.5
BIOL 1103 [0.5]
Foundations of Biology I
BIOL 1104 [0.5]
Foundations of Biology II
BIOL 3306 [0.5]
Human Anatomy and Physiology
9.  1.0 credit from:1.0
CHEM 1001 [0.5]
& CHEM 1002 [0.5]
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
CHEM 1005 [0.5]
& CHEM 1006 [0.5]
Elementary Chemistry I
Elementary Chemistry II
10.  1.0 credit in:1.0
MATH 1007 [0.5]
Elementary Calculus I
MATH 1107 [0.5]
Linear Algebra I
11.  4.0 credits in free electives4.0
C. Additional Requirements
12. School Language Proficiency Requirement must be satisfied
Total Credits20.0

B.Sc. Honours in Linguistics
with a Concentration in Psycholinguistics and Communication Disorders (Neuroscience) (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (9.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
ALDS 1001 [0.5]
Language Matters: Introduction to ALDS
LING 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to Linguistics I
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LING 2005 [0.5]
Linguistic Analysis
LING 2007 [0.5]
Phonetics
3.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LING 3004 [0.5]
Syntax I
LING 3007 [0.5]
Phonology I
4.  1.0 credit in LING at the 4000 level1.0
5.  1.5 credits in LING, excluding LING 11001.5
6.  3.5 credits from the Concentration:
a. 0.5 credit in:0.5
LING 1002 [0.5]
Introduction to Linguistics II
b. 2.0 credits in:2.0
LING 2604 [0.5]
Communication Disorders I
LING 3601 [0.5]
Language Processing and the Brain
LING 3603 [0.5]
Child Language
LING 3604 [0.5]
Communication Disorders II
c. 1.0 credit from:1.0
LING 4601 [0.5]
Cognitive Neuroscience of Language
LING 4603 [0.5]
First Language Acquisition
LING 4605 [0.5]
Psycholinguistic Research Methods
LING 4606 [0.5]
Statistics for Language Research
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (11.0 credits)
7.  3.5 credits in Neuroscience:3.5
a. 2.0 credits in:
NEUR 1202 [0.5]
Neuroscience of Mental Health and Psychiatric Disease
NEUR 1203 [0.5]
Neuroscience of Mental Health and Neurological Disease
NEUR 2001 [0.5]
Introduction to Research Methods in Neuroscience
NEUR 2002 [0.5]
Introduction to Statistics in Neuroscience
b. 1.5 credits from:
NEUR 2201 [0.5]
Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
NEUR 2202 [0.5]
Neurodevelopment and Plasticity
NEUR 3206 [0.5]
Sensory and Motor Neuroscience
NEUR 3207 [0.5]
Integrative Neuroscience
NEUR 3303 [0.5]
The Neuroscience of Consciousness
8.  1.5 credits in:1.5
BIOL 1103 [0.5]
Foundations of Biology I
BIOL 1104 [0.5]
Foundations of Biology II
BIOL 3306 [0.5]
Human Anatomy and Physiology
9.  1.0 credit from:1.0
CHEM 1001 [0.5]
& CHEM 1002 [0.5]
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
CHEM 1005 [0.5]
& CHEM 1006 [0.5]
Elementary Chemistry I
Elementary Chemistry II
10.  1.0 credit in:1.0
MATH 1007 [0.5]
Elementary Calculus I
MATH 1107 [0.5]
Linear Algebra I
11.  4.0 credits in free electives4.0
C. Additional Requirements
12. School Language Proficiency Requirement must be satisfied
Total Credits20.0

B.Sc. Honours in Linguistics
with a Concentration in Psycholinguistics and Communication Disorders (Psychology) (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (9.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit in:1.0
ALDS 1001 [0.5]
Language Matters: Introduction to ALDS
LING 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to Linguistics I
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LING 2005 [0.5]
Linguistic Analysis
LING 2007 [0.5]
Phonetics
3.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LING 3004 [0.5]
Syntax I
LING 3007 [0.5]
Phonology I
4.  1.0 credit in LING at the 4000 level1.0
5.  1.5 credits in LING, excluding LING 11001.5
6.  3.5 credits from the Concentration
a. 0.5 credit in:0.5
LING 1002 [0.5]
Introduction to Linguistics II
b. 2.0 credits in:2.0
LING 2604 [0.5]
Communication Disorders I
LING 3601 [0.5]
Language Processing and the Brain
LING 3603 [0.5]
Child Language
LING 3604 [0.5]
Communication Disorders II
c. 1.0 credit from:1.0
LING 4601 [0.5]
Cognitive Neuroscience of Language
LING 4603 [0.5]
First Language Acquisition
LING 4605 [0.5]
Psycholinguistic Research Methods
LING 4606 [0.5]
Statistics for Language Research
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (11.0 credits)
7.  3.5 credits in Psychology:3.5
a. 2.0 credits in:
PSYC 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to Psychology I
PSYC 1002 [0.5]
Introduction to Psychology II
PSYC 2001 [0.5]
Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology
PSYC 2002 [0.5]
Introduction to Statistics in Psychology
b. 1.5 credits from:
PSYC 2307 [0.5]
Human Neuropsychology I
PSYC 2700 [0.5]
Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
PSYC 3307 [0.5]
Human Neuropsychology II
PSYC 3506 [0.5]
Cognitive Development
PSYC 3702 [0.5]
Perception
8.  1.5 credits in:1.5
BIOL 1103 [0.5]
Foundations of Biology I
BIOL 1104 [0.5]
Foundations of Biology II
BIOL 3306 [0.5]
Human Anatomy and Physiology
9.  1.0 credit from:1.0
CHEM 1001 [0.5]
& CHEM 1002 [0.5]
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
CHEM 1005 [0.5]
& CHEM 1006 [0.5]
Elementary Chemistry I
Elementary Chemistry II
10.  1.0 credit in:1.0
MATH 1007 [0.5]
Elementary Calculus I
MATH 1107 [0.5]
Linear Algebra I
11.  4.0 credits in free electives4.0
C. Additional Requirements
12. School Language Proficiency Requirement must be satisfied
Total Credits20.0

Linguistics (LING) Courses

LING 1001 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Linguistics I

Nature of language and linguistic knowledge. Formal description and analysis of language: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 1000 and LALS 1001 (no longer offered).
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 1002 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Linguistics II

Survey of topics in linguistics: language change, sociolinguistics, language acquisition and processing. May include language typology, language contact and writing systems.
Prerequisite(s): LING 1001 (may be taken concurrently).
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 1100 [0.5 credit]
The Mysteries of Language

This course explores some intriguing mysteries of language - whether it is unique to humans, how children master its complexities so easily, how the brain handles language, how languages are born and die. These questions lead us to interesting discoveries about the human mind.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 1100 (no longer offered).
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 2005 [0.5 credit]
Linguistic Analysis

Phonological, morphological and syntactic analysis of linguistic data. Coursework consists primarily of practical exercises in data analysis.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Precludes additional credit for LALS 2003 (no longer offered) or LALS 2005 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 1001.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 2007 [0.5 credit]
Phonetics

Description of speech sounds; transcription systems; articulation; acoustics of speech sounds; perception of speech sounds; cross-linguistic diversity and phonetic universals; the role of phonetics in grammar.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Precludes additional credit for LALS 2001/LING 2001 (no longer offered), and LALS 3001 if taken prior to 2004.
Prerequisite(s): LING 1001.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 2504 [0.5 credit]
Language and Communication

Some of the central topics in the study of language and communication as pursued by linguists and philosophers. Topics include: the nature of meaning; the connections between language, communication and cognition; language as a social activity.
Also listed as PHIL 2504, COMS 2504.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 2504, LALS 2800 [1.0], MCOM 2504, MCOM 2800 [1.0], and PHIL 2800 [1.0].
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 2604 [0.5 credit]
Communication Disorders I

A survey course highlighting congenital, developmental and acquired disorders of speech, language, fluency, hearing and voice; prevalence, current research, assessment and intervention approaches for each disorder will be presented.
Also listed as ALDS 2604.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 2604 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): second year standing or permission of the instructor.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 3001 [0.5 credit]
Language Typology and Universals

Cross-linguistic survey of syntactic and morphological patterns found in the languages of the world. Typological classification and identification of language universals.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Precludes additional credit for LALS 3001 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 2005.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 3004 [0.5 credit]
Syntax I

Introduction to syntactic theory. Representation and analysis of sentence structure, syntactic relations and syntactic dependencies. Testing of grammatical hypotheses.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Precludes additional credit for LALS 3004 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 2005.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 3005 [0.5 credit]
Morphology I

Introduction to word structure and morphological theory. Topics include inflectional and derivational morphology, morphological processes, and interaction of morphology with phonology and syntax.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Precludes additional credit for LALS 3005 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 2005 and LING 2007.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 3007 [0.5 credit]
Phonology I

The sound-systems of languages, analysis of phonological structure; generative phonology; phonological rules and derivations; cross-linguistic diversity and universals; segmental phonology; stress; tone.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Precludes additional credit for LALS 3002/LING 3002 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 2001 (no longer offered) or LING 2007.
Lecture three hours a week.

LING 3009 [0.5 credit]
Special Topic in Linguistics

Selected topics in general linguistics not ordinarily treated in the regular course program. Contents of the course vary from year to year.
Lectures and discussion three hours per week.

LING 3101 [0.5 credit]
Historical Linguistics

Language change; sound change; analogy; the comparative method; internal reconstruction; the philological method; historical linguistics and pre-history; language change and theories of grammar.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 2101 and LALS 3101 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 1002 and LING 2001 (no longer offered) or LING 2007.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 3504 [0.5 credit]
Pragmatics

The study of language in its conversational and cultural contexts. Topics include: conversational implicature; deixis; the semantics-pragmatics boundary; speaker's reference; speech acts. May include cross-cultural pragmatics.
Also listed as PHIL 3504.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 2800 [1.0], LALS 3504, MCOM 3504, MCOM 2800 [1.0], and PHIL 2800 [1.0].
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing, and one of LING 1001, PHIL 2001, PHIL 2504/COMM 2504/LING 2504 or PHIL 3506, or LING 3505 or permission of the Department of Philosophy or School of Linguistics and Language Studies.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 3505 [0.5 credit]
Semantics

Study of language meaning. Lexical meaning and meanings of larger linguistic expressions, including nominal units, verbal units, and sentences. Meaning relationships between utterances. Relationship between linguistic meaning (semantics) and contextual meaning (pragmatics). Basic formal treatments of semantics.
Also listed as PHIL 3506.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 3505 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing, and one of LING 1001, PHIL 2001, PHIL 2504/LING 2504/COMM 2504 or PHIL 3504/LING 3504, or permission of the Department of Philosophy or School of Linguistics and Language Studies.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 3601 [0.5 credit]
Language Processing and the Brain

Introduction to adult language processing and neurolinguistics. Psychological processes underlying speech production and perception, word recognition and sentence processing. Biological foundation and neuro-cognitive mechanisms of language. Experimental techniques and methodologies of current psycholinguistic studies.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as PSYC 3709.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 2601 and LALS 3601 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 1001 or PSYC 2700 and second-year standing, or permission of the instructor.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 3603 [0.5 credit]
Child Language

Milestones associated with the development of grammatical, pragmatic and metalinguistic competence from birth to about age ten, and the relative contributions of the environment, cognitive development and inborn knowledge to this development.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as PSYC 3508.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 2603 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 1001 and second-year standing, or permission of the instructor.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 3604 [0.5 credit]
Communication Disorders II

In-depth evaluation of current psycholinguistic models of processes underlying communication disorders and the biomedical support for such models. Emphasis on contrasting developmental disorders with acquired disorders. Additional exploration of other modalities (sign language, reading).
Also listed as ALDS 3604.
Precludes additional credit for LING 3009 Section "A", if taken Winter 2013.
Prerequisite(s): LING 2604.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 3701 [0.5 credit]
Corpus Linguistics

Computer-assisted analysis of electronic collections of naturally occurring language. Applications in such areas as language variation, grammar, lexicology, phraseology, translation, and learner language.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as ALDS 3701.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 3701 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in Applied Linguistics and Discourse Studies, or in Linguistics, or enrolment in the CTESL program, or permission of the instructor.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 3702 [0.5 credit]
Sociolinguistics

The place of language within society; bilingual and multilingual communities; language, social mobility and social stratification; sociolinguistic factors in language change.
Also listed as ALDS 3202.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 2701 and ALDS 2701 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): ALDS 1001 and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

LING 3801 [0.5 credit]
Structure of a Specific Language

Description and analysis of the structure of a specific language applying phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Language to be studied will be announced in advance by the School.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 3801 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 2001 (no longer offered) or LING 2005 or LING 2007.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 3900 [1.0 credit]
Independent Study

Research under the supervision of a member of the School. Normally available only to third- and fourth-year students in Linguistics.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor.


LING 3901 [0.5 credit]
Independent Study

Research under the supervision of a member of the School. Normally available only to third- and fourth-year students in Linguistics.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor.


LING 4004 [0.5 credit]
Syntax II

Advanced topics in syntax.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Precludes additional credit for LALS 4002/LING 4002 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 3004 or permission of the instructor.
Seminars three hours a week.

LING 4005 [0.5 credit]
Morphology II

Advanced topics in morphology.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): LING 3005.
Seminars three hours a week.

LING 4007 [0.5 credit]
Phonology II

Advanced topics in phonology.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Precludes additional credit for LALS 4001/LING 4001(no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 3002 (no longer offered), or LING 3007, or permission of the instructor.
Seminars three hours a week.

LING 4009 [0.5 credit]
Special Topic in Linguistics

Examination of a topic or more specialized area in linguistics or language study. Topic to be announced.
Prerequisite(s): third- or fourth-year standing in Linguistics or permission of the instructor. This course is repeatable for credit when the topic changes.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as LING 5009, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminars three hours a week.

LING 4101 [0.5 credit]
Historical Linguistics: English

A theory-intensive course that will study the development of English starting with Proto-Indo-European progressing through Common Germanic to the stages of English itself. Topics include phonological sound changes, phonemic inventories, and morphological and syntactic typology.
Prerequisite(s): LING 3001 or LING 3101.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as LING 5101, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminars three hours a week.

LING 4412 [0.5 credit]
Diversité du français

Études des variétés du français, dans ses dimensions spatiales. Le contenu précis de ce cours varie selon les années. Consulter le site web du Département de français pour obtenir les détails. The course is taught in French, but students will submit written assignments in English.
Also listed as FREN 4412.
Prerequisite(s): FREN 2401 and FREN 3050, or permission of the Department.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as FREN 5412 and LING 5412, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminars three hours a week.

LING 4413 [0.5 credit]
Diachronie du français

Étude du français, dans ses dimensions historiques. Le contenu précis de ce cours varie selon les années. Consulter le site web du Département de français pour obtenir les détails. The course is taught in French, but students will submit written assignments in English.
Also listed as FREN 4413.
Prerequisite(s): FREN 2401 and FREN 3050, or permission of the Department.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as FREN 5413 and LING 5413, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminars three hours a week.

LING 4414 [0.5 credit]
Analyse du français

Étude du français, dans ses dimensions morphologiques, syntaxiques ou phonologiques. Le contenu précis de ce cours varie selon les années. Consulter le site web du Département de français pour obtenir les détails. Course is taught in French, but students will submit written assignments in English.
Also listed as FREN 4414.
Prerequisite(s): FREN 2401 and FREN 3050, or permission of the Department.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as FREN 5414 and LING 5414, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminars three hours a week.

LING 4415 [0.5 credit]
Variation du français

Étude des variations internes de la langue, dans des dimensions orales/écrites. Le contenu précis de ce cours varie selon les années. Consulter le site web du Département de français pour obtenir les détails. Course is taught in French, but students submit assignments in English.
Also listed as FREN 4415.
Prerequisite(s): FREN 2401 and FREN 3050, or permission of the Department.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as FREN 5415 and LING 5415, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminars three hours a week.

LING 4505 [0.5 credit]
Formal Semantics

Advanced topics in compositional semantics and its interfaces. Topics may include: logic, semantic types, lambda calculus, intentional contexts, possible world semantics, interfaces with syntax and pragmatics quantification, anaphora, presupposition, implicatures, scope and binding, and model theory.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as PHIL 4505.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 4507 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 3505 or PHIL 3506 or permission of the Department of Philosophy or School of Linguistics and Language Studies.
Seminars three hours a week.

LING 4510 [0.5 credit]
Lexical Semantics

Study of the meaning of words. Topics may include lexical decomposition, meaning variation, lexical relations, and lexical aspect.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as PHIL 4055.
Precludes additional credit for LING 4055 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 3505 or PHIL 3506.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as LING 5510, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

LING 4601 [0.5 credit]
Cognitive Neuroscience of Language

Further study of psychological and neurolinguistic mechanisms of adult language processing. May include topics from first language acquisition.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Precludes additional credit for LALS 4601 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LING 3601 or permission of the instructor.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as LING 5601, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminars three hours a week.

LING 4603 [0.5 credit]
First Language Acquisition

Advanced topics in language acquisition and development and the relative contributions of the environment, cognitive development, and inborn knowledge.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): LING 3603.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as LING 5603, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminars three hours a week.

LING 4604 [0.5 credit]
Practicum in Speech Language Pathology

Through seven-hour-a-week field placements, students pursue personal learning objectives concerning the clinical application of the psycholinguistics of communication disorders and cognitive development. A term paper integrates experiential knowledge gained in the placement with theoretical and empirical knowledge gained from the student’s program of study.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): LING 3604, fourth-year Honours standing in B.A. or B.Sc. in Linguistics with a Concentration in Psycholinguistics and Communication Disorders with a CGPA of 10.0 in the major, and permission from the School of Linguistics and Language Studies.
Field placement one day a week.

LING 4605 [0.5 credit]
Psycholinguistic Research Methods

Experimental methodologies used in current psycholinguistic studies. Topics include experimental design and techniques, descriptive statistics, and interpreting and reporting research findings.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Precludes additional credit for LING 4009 Section "A" (2015-16 and 2016-17) and LING 4009 Section "B" (2013-14) and LING 4009 Section "C" (2017-18).
Prerequisite(s): third- or fourth-year Honours standing in Linguistics or Cognitive Science, or permission of the instructor.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as LING 5605, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

LING 4606 [0.5 credit]
Statistics for Language Research

Application of statistical procedures to analysis of language data and to problems of measurement in experimental linguistics, applied linguistics, psycholinguistics, and related fields.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as ALDS 4606.
Precludes additional credit for ALDS 4906/LING 4009 Section "B" if taken Winter 2015 or Winter 2016.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2002 or NEUR 2002, or permission of the instructor.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as LING 5606 and ALDS 5604, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

LING 4801 [0.5 credit]
Linguistic Field Methods

With a language consultant, students discover the phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures of the target language using linguistic elicitation. Language will vary from year to year, but will normally be a non-European language. Language documentation, data management, ethical issues surrounding research in Indigenous communities.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): LING 2005 and LING 2007.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as ALDS 5801, for which additional credit is precluded.
Lectures three hours a week.

LING 4900 [1.0 credit]
Independent Study in Linguistics

Permits fourth-year Honours students to pursue their interests in a selected area of linguistics.
Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor.


LING 4901 [0.5 credit]
Independent Study in Linguistics

Permits fourth-year Honours students to pursue their interests in a selected area of linguistics.
Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor.


LING 4905 [1.0 credit]
Honours Project in Experimental Linguistics

Students choose existing study in linguistic literature, replicate the study, present findings, compare to original study. Practical experience gathering and preparing materials, running experiments, analyzing data, interpreting findings; real, important contributions to the field of linguistics via replication studies (as mandated by the scientific method).
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Precludes additional credit for LING 4910.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing in Linguistics, with a Major CGPA of 9.0, and permission of the instructor.
Unscheduled.

LING 4910 [1.0 credit]
Honours Thesis in Linguistics

Open to all candidates for the B.A. (Honours) in Linguistics. A thesis project selected in consultation with the School and carried out under the direction of a faculty supervisor.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Precludes additional credit for LING 4905.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing in Linguistics with a CGPA of 10.0 in the major; one of LING 3004, LING 3007, LING 3505, or LING 3601; and permission of the instructor.


Summer session: some of the courses listed in this Calendar are offered during the summer. Hours and scheduling for summer session courses will differ significantly from those reported in the fall/winter Calendar. To determine the scheduling and hours for summer session classes, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Not all courses listed are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for the current session and to determine the term of offering, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

School Language Proficiency Requirement

Students in B.A. Honours, General or Combined Honours programs of the School of Linguistics and Language Studies are required, at graduation, to have a working knowledge of a language other than English. Proficiency is determined by successful completion of a 1.0 credit university course in the language or by an oral or written test given by the School.

B.Sc. Regulations

The regulations presented in this section apply to all Bachelor of Science programs. In addition to the requirements presented here, students must satisfy the University regulations common to all undergraduate students including the process of Academic Performance Evaluation (see the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar).

Breadth Requirement for the B.Sc.

Students in Bachelor of Science Honours, Major, or General programs must present the following credits at graduation:

  1. 2.0 credits in Science Continuation courses not in the major discipline; students completing a double major are considered to have completed this requirement providing they have 2.0 credits in science continuation courses in each of the two majors
  2. 2.0 credits in courses outside of the faculties of Science and Engineering and Design (but may include NSCI 1000)

In most cases, the requirements for individual B.Sc. programs, as stated in this Calendar, contain these requirements, explicitly or implicitly.

Students admitted to B.Sc. programs by transfer from another institution must present at graduation (whether taken at Carleton or elsewhere):

  1. 2.0 credits in courses outside of the faculties of Science and Engineering and Design (but may include NSCI 1000) if, on transfer, the student received credit for fewer than 10.0 credits.
  2. 1.0 credit in courses outside of the faculties of Science and Engineering and Design (but may include NSCI 1000) if, on transfer, the student received credit for 10.0 or more credits.

Declared and Undeclared Students

Students who are registered in a program within the degree are called Declared students. Most students designate a program of study when they first apply for admission and so begin their studies as Declared students. Students may also choose to begin their studies within the B.Sc. degree without being registered in a program. These students are referred to as Undeclared students. The recommended course pattern for Undeclared students is provided in the Undeclared entry of the Programs section of this Calendar. Undeclared students normally must apply to enter a program before beginning their second year of study. The Science Student Success Centre (SSSC) provides Undeclared students guidance to the appropriate support services in making this decision.

Change of Program within the B.Sc. Degree

Students may transfer to a program within the B.Sc. degree if upon entry to the new program they would be in good academic standing.

Other applications for change of program will be considered on their merits; students may be accepted in the new program in Good Standing or on Academic Warning.

Applications to declare or change their program within the B.Sc. Degree must be made online through Carleton Central by completing a Change of Program Elements (COPE) application form within the published deadlines. Acceptance into a program or into a program element or option is subject to any enrolment, and/or specific program, program element or option requirements as published in the relevant Calendar entry.

Minors, Concentrations and Specializations

Students may add a minor, concentration or specialization by completing a Change of Program Elements (COPE) application form online through Carleton Central. Acceptance into a minor, concentration or specialization requires that the student be in Good Standing and is subject to any specific requirements of the intended Minor, Concentration or Specialization as published in the relevant Calendar entry.

Experimental Science Requirement

Students in B.Sc. Honours, Major,  or General degree programs must present at graduation at least two full credits of experimental science chosen from two different departments or institutes from the list below:

Approved Experimental Science Courses
Biochemistry
BIOC 2200 [0.5]
Cellular Biochemistry
BIOC 4001 [0.5]
Methods in Biochemistry
BIOC 4201 [0.5]
Advanced Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering
Biology
BIOL 1103 [0.5]
Foundations of Biology I
BIOL 1104 [0.5]
Foundations of Biology II
BIOL 2001 [0.5]
Animals: Form and Function
BIOL 2002 [0.5]
Plants: Form and Function
BIOL 2104 [0.5]
Introductory Genetics
BIOL 2200 [0.5]
Cellular Biochemistry
BIOL 2600 [0.5]
Ecology
Chemistry
CHEM 1001 [0.5]
General Chemistry I
CHEM 1002 [0.5]
General Chemistry II
CHEM 1005 [0.5]
Elementary Chemistry I
CHEM 1006 [0.5]
Elementary Chemistry II
CHEM 2103 [0.5]
Physical Chemistry I
CHEM 2203 [0.5]
Organic Chemistry I
CHEM 2204 [0.5]
Organic Chemistry II
CHEM 2302 [0.5]
Analytical Chemistry I
CHEM 2303 [0.5]
Analytical Chemistry II
CHEM 2800 [0.5]
Foundations for Environmental Chemistry
Earth Sciences
ERTH 1006 [0.5]
Exploring Planet Earth
ERTH 1009 [0.5]
The Earth System Through Time
ERTH 2102 [0.5]
Mineralogy to Petrology
ERTH 2404 [0.5]
Engineering Geoscience
ERTH 2802 [0.5]
Field Geology I
ERTH 3111 [0.5]
Vertebrate Evolution: Mammals, Reptiles, and Birds
ERTH 3112 [0.5]
Vertebrate Evolution: Fish and Amphibians
ERTH 3204 [0.5]
Mineral Deposits
ERTH 3205 [0.5]
Physical Hydrogeology
ERTH 3806 [0.5]
Structural Geology
Food Sciences
FOOD 3001 [0.5]
Food Chemistry
FOOD 3002 [0.5]
Food Analysis
FOOD 3005 [0.5]
Food Microbiology
Geography
GEOG 1010 [0.5]
Global Environmental Systems
GEOG 3108 [0.5]
Soil Properties
Neuroscience
NEUR 3206 [0.5]
Sensory and Motor Neuroscience
NEUR 3207 [0.5]
Integrative Neuroscience
NEUR 4600 [0.5]
Advanced Lab in Neuroanatomy
Physics
PHYS 1001 [0.5]
Foundations of Physics I
PHYS 1002 [0.5]
Foundations of Physics II
PHYS 1003 [0.5]
Introductory Mechanics and Thermodynamics
PHYS 1004 [0.5]
Introductory Electromagnetism and Wave Motion
PHYS 1007 [0.5]
Elementary University Physics I
PHYS 1008 [0.5]
Elementary University Physics II
PHYS 2202 [0.5]
Wave Motion and Optics
PHYS 2604 [0.5]
Modern Physics I
PHYS 3007 [0.5]
Third Year Physics Laboratory: Selected Experiments and Seminars
PHYS 3606 [0.5]
Modern Physics II
PHYS 3608 [0.5]
Modern Applied Physics

Course Categories for B.Sc. Programs

Science Geography Courses
GEOG 1010 [0.5]
Global Environmental Systems
GEOG 2006 [0.5]
Introduction to Quantitative Research
GEOG 2013 [0.5]
Weather and Water
GEOG 2014 [0.5]
The Earth's Surface
GEOG 3003 [0.5]
Quantitative Geography
GEOG 3010 [0.5]
Field Methods in Physical Geography
GEOG 3102 [0.5]
Geomorphology
GEOG 3103 [0.5]
Watershed Hydrology
GEOG 3104 [0.5]
Principles of Biogeography
GEOG 3105 [0.5]
Climate and Atmospheric Change
GEOG 3106 [0.5]
Aquatic Science and Management
GEOG 3108 [0.5]
Soil Properties
GEOG 4000 [0.5]
Field Studies
GEOG 4005 [0.5]
Directed Studies in Geography
GEOG 4013 [0.5]
Cold Region Hydrology
GEOG 4017 [0.5]
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
GEOG 4101 [0.5]
Two Million Years of Environmental Change
GEOG 4103 [0.5]
Water Resources Engineering
GEOG 4104 [0.5]
Microclimatology
GEOG 4108 [0.5]
Permafrost
Science Psychology Courses
PSYC 2001 [0.5]
Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology
PSYC 2002 [0.5]
Introduction to Statistics in Psychology
PSYC 2700 [0.5]
Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
PSYC 3000 [1.0]
Design and Analysis in Psychological Research
PSYC 3506 [0.5]
Cognitive Development
PSYC 3700 [1.0]
Cognition (Honours Seminar)
PSYC 3702 [0.5]
Perception
PSYC 2307 [0.5]
Human Neuropsychology I
PSYC 3307 [0.5]
Human Neuropsychology II
Science Continuation Courses
A course at the 2000 level or above may be used as a Science Continuation credit in a B.Sc. program if it is not in the student's major discipline, and is chosen from the following:
BIOC (Biochemistry)
BIOL (Biology)
CHEM (Chemistry)
COMP (Computer Science) A maximum of two half-credits at the 1000-level in COMP, excluding COMP 1001 may be used as Science Continuation credits.
ERTH (Earth Sciences), except ERTH 2415 which may be used only as a free elective for any B.Sc. program. Students in Earth Sciences programs may use ERTH 2401, ERTH 2402, and ERTH 2403 only as free electives.
Engineering. Students wishing to register in Engineering courses must obtain the permission of the Faculty of Engineering and Design.
ENSC (Environmental Science)
FOOD (Food Science and Nutrition)
GEOM (Geomatics)
HLTH (Health Sciences)
MATH (Mathematics)
NEUR (Neuroscience)
PHYS (Physics), except PHYS 2903
Science Geography Courses (see list above)
Science Psychology Courses (see list above)
STAT (Statistics)
TSES (Technology, Society, Environment) except TSES 2305. Biology General, Major, and Honours students may use these courses only as free electives. Integrated Science and Environmental Science students may include these courses in their programs but may not count them as part of the Science Sequence.
Science Faculty Electives
Science Faculty Electives are courses at the 1000-4000 level chosen from:
BIOC (Biochemistry)
BIOL (Biology) Biology & Biochemistry students may use BIOL 1010 and BIOL 2005 only as free electives
CHEM (Chemistry) except CHEM 1003, CHEM 1004 and CHEM 1007
COMP (Computer Science) except COMP 1001
ERTH (Earth Sciences) except ERTH 1010, ERTH 1011 and ERTH 2415. Earth Sciences students may use ERTH 2401, ERTH 2402, and ERTH 2403 only as free electives.
Engineering
FOOD (Food Science and Nutrition)
GEOM (Geomatics)
HLTH (Health Science)
MATH (Mathematics)
NEUR (Neuroscience)
PHYS (Physics) except PHYS 1901, PHYS 1902, PHYS 1905, PHYS 2903
Science Geography (see list above)
Science Psychology (see list above)
STAT (Statistics)
TSES (Technology, Society, Environment) Biology General, Major and Honours students may use these courses only as free electives.
Advanced Science Faculty Electives
Advanced Science Faculty Electives are courses at the 2000-4000 level chosen from the Science Faculty Electives list above.
Approved Courses Outside the Faculties of Science and Engineering and Design (may include NSCI 1000)
All courses offered by the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the Faculty of Public Affairs, and the Sprott School of Business are approved as Arts or Social Sciences courses EXCEPT FOR: All Science Geography courses (see list above), all Geomatics (GEOM) courses, all Science Psychology courses (see list above). NSCI 1000 may be used as an Approved Course Outside the Faculties of Science and Engineering and Design.
Free Electives
Any course is allowable as a Free Elective providing it is not prohibited (see below). Students are expected to comply with prerequisite requirements and enrolment restrictions for all courses as published in this Calendar.
Courses Allowable Only as Free Electives in any B.Sc. Program
CHEM 1003 [0.5]
The Chemistry of Food, Health and Drugs
CHEM 1004 [0.5]
Drugs and the Human Body
CHEM 1007 [0.5]
Chemistry of Art and Artifacts
ERTH 1010 [0.5]
Our Dynamic Planet Earth
ERTH 1011 [0.5]
Evolution of the Earth
ERTH 2415 [0.5]
Natural Disasters
ISCI 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to the Environment
ISCI 2000 [0.5]
Natural Laws
ISCI 2002 [0.5]
Human Impacts on the Environment
MATH 0107 [0.5]
Algebra and Geometry
PHYS 1901 [0.5]
Planetary Astronomy
PHYS 1902 [0.5]
From our Star to the Cosmos
PHYS 1905 [0.5]
Physics Behind Everyday Life
PHYS 2903 [0.5]
Physics Towards the Future
Prohibited Courses
The following courses are not acceptable for credit in any B.Sc. program:
COMP 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to Computational Thinking for Arts and Social Science Students
MATH 0005 [0.5]
Precalculus: Functions and Graphs
MATH 0006 [0.5]
Precalculus: Trigonometric Functions and Complex Numbers
MATH 1009 [0.5]
Calculus: with Applications to Business
MATH 1119 [0.5]
Linear Algebra: with Applications to Business
MATH 1401 [0.5]
Elementary Mathematics for Economics I
MATH 1402 [0.5]
Elementary Mathematics for Economics II

Degrees

  • B.Sc. (Honours)
  • B.Sc. (General)
  • B.Sc. (Major)

Admission Requirements

Honours Program

First Year

The Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent including a minimum of six 4U or M courses. For most programs including Biochemistry, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Combined Honours in Biology and Physics, Chemistry and Physics, Computational Biochemistry, Food Science, Nanoscience, Neuroscience, Neuroscience and Mental Health, and Psychology, the six 4U or M courses must include Advanced Functions and two of Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Space Sciences or Physics. (Calculus and Vectors is strongly recommended).

Specific Honours Admission Requirements

For the Honours programs in Earth Sciences, Environmental Science, Geomatics, Interdisciplinary Science and Practice, and Physical Geography, Calculus and Vectors may be substituted for Advanced Functions.

For the Honours programs in Physics and Applied Physics and for double Honours in Mathematics and Physics, Calculus and Vectors is required in addition to Advanced Functions and one of 4U Physics Chemistry, Biology, or Earth and Space Sciences. For all programs in Physics, 4U Physics is strongly recommended.

For the Combined Honours program in Chemistry and Computer Science, 4U Chemistry and Calculus and Vectors are strongly recommended.

For Honours in Psychology, a 4U course in English is recommended.

For Honours in Environmental Science, a 4U course in Biology and Chemistry is recommended.

Advanced Standing

For entry to an Honours program after the completion of 5.0 included credits, a student must have a major CGPA of 5.50 or higher, an overall CGPA of 4.50 or higher and the recommendation of the Honours department or committee. A student beginning the final 10.0 credits towards an Honours degree must present a major CGPA of 6.00 or higher, an overall CGPA of 5.00 or higher and the recommendation of the Honours department or committee. A student beginning the final 5.0 credits towards an Honours degree must present a major CGPA of 6.50 or higher and an overall CGPA of 5.00 or higher, as calculated for graduation. Advanced standing will be granted for studies undertaken elsewhere when these are recognized as the equivalent of subjects offered at Carleton University.

Major Program

General Program

First Year

The Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent including a minimum of six 4U or M courses. The six 4U or M courses must include Advanced Functions and two of Calculus and Vectors, Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Space Science or Physics (Calculus and Vectors is strongly recommended). For the B.Sc. Major in Physics. 4U Physics is strongly recommended. Equivalent courses may be substituted between the old and new Ontario mathematics curriculum.

Advanced Standing

For entry to a General or Major program after the completion of 5.0 included credits, a student must have a major and core CGPA of 3.50 or higher and an overall CGPA of 3.50 or higher. A student beginning the final 5.0 credits towards a General or Major degree must present a major and core CGPA of 4.00 or higher and an overall CGPA of 4.00 or higher, as calculated for graduation. Advanced standing will be granted for studies undertaken elsewhere when these are recognized as the equivalent of subjects offered at Carleton University.

Co-op Option

Direct Admission to the First Year of the Co-op Option

Applicants must:

  1. meet the required overall admission cut-off average and prerequisite course average. These averages may be higher than the stated minimum requirements;
  2. be registered as a full-time student in the Bachelor of Science Honours program;
  3. be eligible to work in Canada (for off-campus work placements).

Note that meeting the above requirements only establishes eligibility for admission to the program. The prevailing job market may limit enrolment in the co-op option.

Note: continuation requirements for students previously admitted to the co-op option and admission requirements for the co-op option after beginning the program are described in the Co-operative Education Regulations section of this Calendar.