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1. Administration of the Regulations

1.1 General Administration

The following regulations apply to all graduate degree and graduate diploma programs administered by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs.

1.2 Student Responsibility

  1. It is the student's responsibility to remain informed of all rules, regulations and procedures required by their program and by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs. Ignorance of regulations will not be accepted as a justification for waiving such regulations and procedures.

    Any exceptions to the rules, regulations and procedures must be approved in writing by the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs.

    Students are responsible for establishing and maintaining contact with their departmental graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs) and, if appropriate, thesis/research supervisor.
  2. To receive their degree or graduate diploma students must fulfill:
    1. all the requirements of the department, school, or institute in which he or she is registered, including completion of an application for graduation;
    2. all regulations of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs;
    3. all University regulations;
    4. all financial obligations to the University.

2. Admission Requirements and Eligibility

2.1 General Requirements

Graduates of recognized universities will be considered for admission to the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs. The University's general policy on admission is outlined below, but all applicants should refer to the departmental websites for details concerning the specific or additional requirements of each department, institute, or school.

2.2 Eligibility

The eligibility of a candidate for admission into one of the graduate programs is based upon:

  • the performance of the candidate and the assessment provided by his/her referees as a measure of the likelihood that the candidate can successfully complete the course of study and research defined by the Senate of the University for the given degree;
  • the capacity of the graduate department, institute, or school to provide a program of study and research that would meet the expectations of the candidate as defined in his/her statement of academic interests and ambitions;
  • the availability of a faculty member competent to supervise the candidate's academic program of study and research.

2.3 Qualifying-Year Program

Applicants who do not qualify for direct admission to the master's program may be admitted to a qualifying-year program.

Admission to the qualifying-year program does not imply automatic admission to the master's program. At the end of the qualifying-year program the student will be required to apply for entry into the master's program, at which time the department will determine the student's eligibility to enter the program. If successful, the student will be informed of this decision by the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs.

Applicants who require 3.0 credits or more of additional requirements to enter the master's program must complete a qualifying year.

Credits taken to fulfill the requirements of the qualifying-year program may not be used for credit for the master's degree. Courses taken extra to the program requirements of the qualifying year and which have been successfully completed may be considered for credit towards the master's degree.

2.4 Master's Program

For admission to the master's program, applicants must hold an honours bachelor's degree, or the equivalent, with, normally,  B+ or better in the honours subject and B- or better overall. Applicants must also be recommended by the department in which they plan to undertake their studies.

2.5 Doctoral Program

For admission to the Ph.D. program, applicants must ordinarily hold a master's degree, or the equivalent, from a recognized university, normally with an average of B+ or better in courses (including thesis where applicable) and normally with no grade below B-.

2.6 Restriction on Degrees

Carleton University does not restrict the number of degrees (bachelor's, master's, Ph.D.) that may be taken in any one discipline at Carleton University, but some departments, institutes or schools may restrict the number to two.

2.7 Graduate Diploma Programs

For admission to the diploma programs, applicants are advised to consult with the individual departments, institutes or school offering the diploma.

3. Application for Admission

3.1 Accommodation Policy for Students with Disabilities

Carleton University has a Senate-approved policy on academic accommodation for students with disabilities. For more information, consult the Paul Menton Centre for Students with Disabilities at http://www2.carleton.ca/pmc

3.2 Application Forms

Applications for admission to the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs should be made through the online applications available at https://gsapplications.carleton.ca

To cover administrative costs, a non-refundable application fee (CDN or US funds) is required with each application.

3.3 Deadlines

Normally, students are admitted to commence study in the fall term. However, some departments, institutes or schools may consider applicants to commence in the winter term or the spring/summer term.

For information on the specific deadlines for applications (with or without financial assistance), please visit the online application site by selecting the "Online Application Account” link from the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs website at https://gsapplications.carleton.ca. In the online application site, application deadlines can be found on the left-hand navigation panel under "Program Deadlines."

Students applying to joint programs with the University of Ottawa should note that application procedures, especially deadlines, are different in the two institutions, and they should contact the individual institution for information.

3.4 Transcripts

Official transcripts of the applicant's entire university record must be sent to the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs . All foreign documents, e.g., transcripts, must be translated into English and be notarized.

3.5 Letters of Reference

All applications must be supported by a minimum of two confidential letters of recommendation.  The total number of referees required for your application depends on the program to which you are applying.  A suitable referee is an individual who is fully knowledgeable and aware of your education and abilities.  Referees should be academic in nature where possible.  Professional referees will only be accepted in situations where the applicant’s professional experience is most relevant.  You will need to supply the names of your referees, and their email address, in the online application.

3.6 Proficiency in English

Proficiency in English is necessary to pursue graduate studies at Carleton University. All applicants whose first language is not English must satisfy this requirement in one of the following ways:

  1. To present an official overall score of 70 on the Canadian Academic English Language (CAEL) Assessment; or
  2. To present an official Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 580 on the paper-based test (PBT), or an overall score of 86 on the internet-based test (IBT) with a minimum score in each component of: writing-22; speaking-22; reading-20; and listening-20; or
  3. To present an official overall International English Language Testing System (IELTS) score of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each band score; or
  4. To present an official minimum score of 60 on the Pearson Test of English (Academic); or
  5. To have completed ESLA 1900 or ESLA 1905 at Carleton University with a final grade of B- or higher; or
  6. To present official certification (transcripts) to indicate that they have completed an undergraduate or graduate degree within the past three years in a university in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom or any other country in which the primary language is English, and where the language of instruction in the relevant educational institution was exclusively English.

FGPA reserves the right to require further documentation or additional testing if they feel it necessary to demonstrate the required level of English language proficiency.

Note that some programs demand higher levels of competence in English, as specified in their Admissions Requirements in this Calendar.

Applicants whose first language is not English and who do not meet the requirements stated above may be offered admission to a graduate degree program with an English as a Second Language Requirement (ESLR) and/or will be required to take prescribed remedial course work as a condition of continuing in their program.

4. Admissions Procedure

4.1 General Procedure

All applicants for admission will be examined and evaluated by the department, institute, school or program in which the applicant wishes to study. All supporting documents (transcripts, letters of reference, etc.) must be received before any application can receive formal consideration.

Recommendations for admission will be forwarded to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs for consideration. The official offer of admission comes from the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs. Any correspondence from departments, institutes, schools or programs with regard to acceptance is not official.

4.2 Admission Validity for New Students

The Statement of Standing on Admission is valid only for the term stipulated on the form. If the applicant fails to register for this term, his/her admission and registration eligibility will lapse automatically and he/she must re-apply for admission.

4.3 Revocation of Admission or Registration

Applications for admission or registration will be revoked if the University determines that the applicant has provided incomplete or misleading information.

5. Program Requirements

5.1 General Information

Program Descriptions and Details of Courses can be found in subsequent sections of this Calendar. Prospective applicants should note particularly the admission requirements, the fields in which advanced study and research may be undertaken, and the program requirements, in addition to the general regulations of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs, which are detailed in this section.

5.2 Qualifying-Year Program

Students in the qualifying year will ordinarily register in 5.0 credits at the senior undergraduate level. Of these 5.0 credits, normally no more than 1.0 credit at the 2000-level and no more than 2.0 credits at the 5000-level may be taken. Credits taken to fulfill the requirements of the qualifying-year program may not be used for credit towards the master's degree.

5.3 Master's Program

The normal requirement for the master's degree is 5.0 credits (including the thesis where applicable).

In the case of a master's degree in the range of 5.0-9.0 credits, 1.0 credit may be selected from those offered at the senior undergraduate level, that is, at the 4000-level, with the approval of the program.

In the case of a 10.0 or more-credit master's degree, with program approval, 2.0 credits may be selected from those offered at the senior undergraduate level, that is, at the 4000-level.

5.4 Doctoral Program

Ordinarily, all courses taken for credit towards the Ph.D. degree must be at the 5000- or 6000-level.

The thesis will ordinarily carry a weight of about half of the total requirement of 10.0 credits.

5.5 Language Requirements

Some graduate programs require a reading knowledge of one or more languages other than English. Language requirements will be prescribed by programs according to their regulations and the needs of their students. Language requirements must be completed within the time limit allowed for the completion of the student's program.

6. Transfer of Credit

6.1 Transfer of Credit on Admission

Graduate courses completed at another institution or at Carleton University that have not been used to fulfill the requirements of another degree program may be accepted in partial fulfillment of Carleton's degree requirements. Credit for such work will be determined in each case by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs on the recommendation of the program concerned.

Master's candidates will be permitted to transfer the equivalent of up to 40 per cent of their coursework credit requirements on admission. In addition, if a master's candidate is granted transfer of credit for 40 per cent of their coursework credit requirements, his/her remaining credits at Carleton must be at the 5000 level.

Doctoral candidates may be given advanced standing for work completed at other universities, but must normally register for a minimum of one year of full-time studies thereafter at Carleton and fulfill the thesis and comprehensive examination requirements. Students admitted with transfer of credits in a Ph.D. program may be required to pass a qualifying examination upon entry.

A candidate who has completed credits as a special student will only be permitted to transfer such credits for degree credit in the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs with the permission of the Dean.

Special students enrolled in a graduate level course are subject to the special student regulations outlined in the Undergraduate Calendar at http://www.carleton.ca/calendars/ugrad/current.

Up to 1.0 credit of Carleton courses at the 5000 level or higher, completed by a student registered in the final year of study at a Carleton University undergraduate honours degree or equivalent may be considered for advanced standing in a Carleton University Master's degree, if the latter offers an Accelerated Pathway.

Students who are considered to participate in an Accelerated Pathway must obtain authorization from the academic unit offering this Master's program. All courses taken as part of the Accelerated Pathway must be at the 5000 level or higher. Details are specified in the corresponding "About the Program" section of the Calendar.

6.2 Transfer of Credit After Admission

A student admitted to and eligible to register in a graduate program is not permitted to register at Carleton University at the same time in any other graduate program or as an undergraduate or special student.

7. Registration and Course Selection

7.1 The Calendar Year

The Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs divides the calendar year into three terms; each term comprises about thirteen weeks of lectures or seminars. The first term of the academic year is designated as the fall term; the second term of the academic year is designated as the winter term; and the third term of the calendar year is designated as the spring/summer term. The precise dates of registration for the fall, winter, and spring/summer terms are specified in the Academic Schedule section of this Calendar.

7.2 Course/Program Approval

Initial course/program registration and any subsequent course changes must be approved by the program's graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs). This approval is also required for any undergraduate student who wishes to register in a graduate-level course.

Credit will be granted only for those courses and research activities for which the candidate is formally registered. An unregistered student is not entitled to attend lectures, tutorials, or seminars, and is not entitled to thesis supervision, examination privileges, or access to research facilities. Students will receive no credit for any work completed during a term in which they were not registered.

7.3 Student Records Information
 

Names

The University is committed to the integrity of its student records. Students are required to provide on their application for admission their complete legal name. Any requests to change a name, by means of alteration, deletion, substitution, or addition, must be accompanied by appropriate supporting documentation. Upon making application for graduation, students may be asked to provide proof of their name.

Addresses

Incorrect address information will delay the receipt of awards and student information. Students must update the following address information at https://central.carleton.ca permanent or mailing address (used for registration information):

  • mailing address (used for all mail during the academic session)
  • telephone number for permanent address and for mailing address

Disclosure of Information

Carleton University is required to disclose personal information such as Ontario Education Numbers, student characteristics and educational outcomes to the Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities under s. 15 of the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities Act, R.S.O. 1990, Chapter M. 19, as amended. The ministry collects this data for purposes such as planning, allocating and administering public funding to colleges, universities and other post-secondary educational and training institutions and to conduct research and analysis, including longitudinal studies, and statistical activities conducted by or on behalf of the ministry for purposes that relate to post-secondary education and training. Further information on how the Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities uses this personal information is available on the ministry’s website.

Further information on the collection and use of student-level enrolment-related data can be obtained from the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities website: http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca/

In accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA), all personal and academic information is considered confidential and will not be disclosed to a third party without the authorization of the person to whom the information pertains. In addition, the University will disclose at the time of collection of personal information the purpose for which that information will be used. For further information, please see http://carleton.ca/privacy/ fippa-at-carleton-university.

Electronic Communication

The University provides each student with an email address and uses this as an official channel of communication with the student. A message sent to a student's university-provided email address constitutes an official communication to the student. Students are responsible for monitoring their University email address on a regular basis for as long as they are active in the academic affairs of the university. Requests from students regarding academic or administrative issues must be sent from the student's university-provided email address.

7.4 Course Selection

Students proceeding to a graduate degree or diploma must arrange their program according to the regulations of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs and their program.

The course and thesis requirements of each graduate program are organized or defined in units of credits: 1.0 credit is typically made up of three hours of lectures or seminars a week for two terms, or the equivalent; 0.5 credit is typically made up of three hours of lectures or seminars a week for one term, or the equivalent; 0.25 credit is typically made up of three hours of lectures or seminars a week for six weeks, or the equivalent.

7.5 Evaluation

To gain standing in a course, a student must meet the course requirements for attendance, term work, and examinations. Instructors will inform their classes by distributing written notices, before the last day for late registration, of the elements and their weighting that will contribute to the final grade, including (where applicable) attendance, class participation, essays, tests, laboratories, studio-workshops, other course-related work assignments, and final examinations.

7.6 Tutorial or Reading Courses

Tutorial or Reading Courses are arranged to allow students to take full advantage of all the resources of the University in areas or fields of a very highly specialized nature. Such arrangements are subject to the approval of the departmental graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs).

7.7 Audit Course

Graduate students must have approval from the course instructor and their program graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs) to audit a course.

  • Full-time students are not charged an additional fee.
  • Part-time students may only take 1.25 credits per term. 

The student should discuss with the instructor the conditions and expectations under which as an auditing student they may be permitted to participate, including attendance and participation in class discussions and group work, and the submission of any material.

A request to change course registration from audit to credit status, or credit to audit, must be received by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs no later than the last day to add a course (of that duration) in the term. Students must satisfy all registration requirements to register in the course for academic credit. Students may not retroactively appeal to change the registration status from audit to credit, but may subsequently re-register in the course for credit. Graduate students are limited to a maximum of 1.0 course-weight audit registration per program.

7.8 Course Numbering System

Each course is designated by an eight-character alphanumeric code. The first four letters indicate the department, institute, school or committee under whose auspices the course is offered. The four numerical digits identify the specific course. The credit value is indicated in square brackets following the course number.

7.9 Status

Full- or part-time status is established at the time of admission to a program. Graduate students admitted and registered as full-time students will be required to continue in and complete their program as full-time students, and will be assessed full-time fees for the duration of their program. Graduate students admitted and registered as part-time students will be required to continue and complete their program as part-time students, and will be assessed part-time fees for the duration of their program.

A part-time graduate student will not register in more than 1.25 credits per term, including audit courses.

Students who are unsure of their status should contact the office of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs for assistance at 613-520-2525.

7.10 Change of Status from Full- Time to Part-Time

Students who have valid reasons for changing status from full-time to part-time prior to registration for a term may apply for permission by:

  • writing to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs stating the reason(s) for seeking exemption from the full-time registration requirements stated in 7.9
  • by completing a Change of Registration Status Form, accompanied by a statement from the departmental graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs) - and the thesis supervisor, if applicable - in support of their request.

It is understood that such a status change will be granted only in exceptional cases (e.g., for medical reasons.)

Exemptions are normally granted for a term.

7.11 Off-Campus Research

Graduate students may arrange to undertake full-time studies or research at another institution or in the field. Such activity may apply to only a part of the total program. The off-campus period may not normally exceed twelve months.

Requests for permission to undertake full-time off-campus study or research must be submitted to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs with the approval of the department graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs). Such requests should include the following information:

  • a detailed statement of the research proposal or program of studies, and the specific arrangements that are proposed for the supervision and direction of the work;
  • an explanation of the reasons why the work cannot be satisfactorily undertaken while on campus at Carleton University;
  • a description of the studies and/or research facilities that are available at the proposed off-campus location;
  • a written statement from a responsible official (for example, the on-site supervisor or director) of the external institution confirming that the proposed arrangements are satisfactory and that the candidate will be able to undertake research or studies;
  • a time schedule for the proposed studies or research work;
  • a statement of the candidate's expected sources of financial support.

Once the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs grants approval, the student is expected to register prior to departure.

7.12 Cotutelle

Doctoral students may arrange to undertake a cotutelle in which they will complete the requirements of a Ph.D. program in both their home university and a partner university in another country.

Under such an arrangement, doctoral students conduct their dissertation research collaboratively, sequentially, and for roughly equal amounts of time in both universities. They are supervised in their dissertation research by a faculty member from each of the universities. The dissertation is then examined by a committee whose members are drawn from both institutions.

Students who undertake a cotutelle are not subject to general regulation 7.11.

Requests for permission to undertake a cotutelle must be made in accordance with Carleton University's Cotutelle Policy. More information can be found in the official Carleton University Cotutelle Policy.

7.13 Dual Master's Degree

Master's students may undertake a Dual Master's Degree pathway in which they would complete the requirements of a master's program in both their home university and a partner university.

Students who undertake a Dual Master's Degree pathway are not subject to general regulation 7.11.

Requests for permission to undertake a Dual Master's Degree pathway must be made in accordance with Carleton University's Dual Master's Degree Policy. More information can be found in the official Carleton University Dual Master's Degree Policy.

7.14 Inter-University Cooperation in Graduate Instruction

Under certain circumstances, it is permissible for a student admitted to a graduate degree program and registered at one university to follow an approved graduate-level credit course at another university. All interested students should consult the chair/director of their department, institute or school prior to registration in order to obtain further information on procedures and conditions of eligibility. In order for this procedure to be valid, students must be officially registered at their home institution.

7.15 University of Ottawa

Carleton University and the University of Ottawa have developed a number of joint programs at the graduate level. Where formal joint programs do not exist, a graduate student may be permitted to follow up to 2.0 credits at the 5000- or 6000-level at the University of Ottawa. Reciprocal arrangements exist among departments, institutes and schools at both universities. All interested students should consult their program graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs), prior to registration, in order to obtain further information on particular departmental conditions of eligibility and procedures. Students must be officially registered at their home institution.

8. Continuous Registration

8.1 Loss of Status

Any student who remains unregistered in his/her degree program for three continuous terms (twelve months) will lose his/her graduate status.

8.2 Continuous Registration in Thesis, Research Essay, or Independent Research Project

Any student (full-time or part-time), after initial registration in a thesis, research essay or independent research project, must maintain this registration in all successive terms (including the term in which the student is examined) until his/her thesis, research essay or independent research project is completed. Completion means submission of a final grade to the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs after modifications/revisions. Students should note that approval to register in the thesis, etc, is given on the understanding that the student will be in regular contact with his/her supervisor, and that thesis research will be actively pursued in each term of registration.

8.3 Deposit of Thesis

In the case of a thesis, registration must be maintained until the thesis is electronically deposited with the office of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs. Should thesis not be deposited with the office of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs by the last day for late registration in a given term, the student will be required to register for that term.

8.4 Reinstatement

Students whose files have been closed as a result of failure to observe continuous registration requirements or who have lost their status for non-registration for three continuous terms must apply for reinstatement within the term they lose their status if they wish to continue their studies. If reinstated, students must pay a reinstatement charge plus the equivalent of 1.0 credit tuition fees for each term in which they failed to register, as well as for the current term of registration.

8.5 Exemption from Registration

Students who have valid reasons for not registering for a term may apply for permission to remain unregistered by:

  • Writing to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs prior to the registration period stating the reasons for seeking exemption from registration;
  • by completing an Exemption from Registration form accompanied by a statement from the program graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs) - and from their thesis supervisor, if applicable - confirming that they will not be on campus for the term, will not use any University facilities (that is, library, laboratories, computer centre, etc.), or receive any supervision, including supervision through correspondence;
  • While exempt from registration, students will not be registered with the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs, neither will they be required to pay fees for this period. They will not be eligible to receive awards administered by Carleton University. In the case of external awards, the regulations of the particular granting agency will apply.

It is understood that such an exemption from registration will be granted only in exceptional cases (for example, medical reasons).

Exemptions are normally granted for one term.

When exemption from registration for a term or terms has been approved by the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs, this period will be exempt from the overall time limit for completion of the program.

An administrative fee per term for an exemption will be charged to the student's account.

8.6 Off-Campus Registration

Students who have been permitted to study off campus while registered full-time at Carleton must register using Carleton Central Web Registration at http://carleton.ca/registrar/registration/.

8.7 Course Changes

A course change is defined as the addition or deletion of one or more individual courses by a registered graduate student. This is the acceptable procedure for revising or correcting a graduate student's registration. Some course changes must be approved by the student's program graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs).

The deadline dates for course changes are stipulated in the academic schedule of this Calendar.

8.8 Withdrawal

Graduate students wishing to terminate their registration in a graduate program (that is, drop all courses) must notify their department in writing of their intent to withdraw.

Withdrawal Credit

When a student officially withdraws, a full refund will be issued if notification is received within the refund period. Students are encouraged to examine the financial and award implications of withdrawal. Refund deadline information is available at the Business Office and online at http://carleton.ca/fees.

Mid-Term Transfer of Program

There is no procedure at Carleton University for direct "mid-term" transfer from one graduate program to another. Similarly, there can be no direct transfer to or from undergraduate or special student status. Any candidate who elects to change programs after registration (before the last day of late registration) will be required to withdraw from the first program and then register in the second.

9. Examinations


9.1 General Remarks

Final examinations in courses will be held at the times indicated in the academic schedule. Graduate students must obtain grades that meet the standards outlined in Section 11, Academic Standing, and that satisfy the specific requirements of the program concerned.

9.2 Examination Regulations

Students writing tests and examinations should be aware of the rules governing examination conduct.  These rules include those listed in the Academic Integrity section of this Calendar and information about policy and procedures for writing examinations distributed at the final examination.

For examinations scheduled during the official examination period, it may be necessary to schedule examinations during the day for classes held in the evening and vice versa, or on Saturday and Sunday.

All tests and examinations are subject to the following rules:

  1. Tests or examinations given in class may not exceed the time allotted for the class.
  2. The schedule for any term tests or examinations to be held outside class time must be communicated in the course outline.  Students who are unable to write during this scheduled time must be accommodated before the last day of classes.
  3. If there is a final examination in the summer term, it will be held during the official examination period;
  4. If there is a final examination or an end-of-term examination in a multi-term course, this examination will be held in the official examination period;
  5. No summative tests or final examinations may be held during the last two weeks of fall or winter terms, or during the last week of each half of the summer term;
  6. Formative tests or examinations may be held during the last two weeks of classes of fall or winter terms, or during the last week of each half of the summer term, provided they do not total more than 15% of the final grade.  The purpose of formative tests or examinations is to provide feedback to students on a component of the course content.
  7. No tests or examinations may be held between the end of classes in a term and the beginning of formally scheduled examinations;
  8. Normally, final take-home examinations in any term will be assigned on or before the last day of classes and are due on the last day of the official examination period.  Final take-home examinations not set according to this normal practice must be formally scheduled by Scheduling and Examination Services and are subject to overload rules.  In all cases the rules for take-home examinations must be well communicated to students by course instructors.
  9. Students are not required to write with an exam conflict (defined as two examinations scheduled at the same time) nor in an exam overload, defined as (i) 3 or more examinations scheduled in 3 consecutive time slots, (ii) 4 or more examinations scheduled in 5 consecutive time slots, or (iii) 5 or more examinations scheduled in 7 consecutive time slots, where a time slot refers to the morning, afternoon, or evening time slot on an exam day.

9.3 Special/Deferred Final Examinations

In some situations, students are unable to complete term work because of illness or other circumstances beyond their control, which forces them to delay submission of the work.

  1. Students who claim illness, injury or other extraordinary circumstances beyond their control as a reason for missed term work are held responsible for immediately informing the instructor concerned and for making alternate arrangements with the instructor and in all cases this must occur no later than three (3.0) working days after the term work was due.  The alternate arrangement must be made before the last day of classes in the term as published in the academic schedule.  Normally, any deferred term work will be completed by the last day of term.  In all cases, formative evaluations providing feedback to the student should be replaced with formative evaluations.  In the event the altered due date must extend beyond the last day of classes in the term, the instructor will assign a grade of zero for the work not submitted and submit the student’s earned grade accordingly; the instructor may submit a change of grade at a later date.  Term work cannot be deferred by the Registrar.
  2. In cases where a student is not able to complete term work due to illness or injury for a significant period of time/or long term, the instructor and/or student may elect to consult with the Registrar's Office (undergraduate courses) Graduate Registrar (graduate courses) to determine appropriate action.
  3. If a student is concerned the instructor did not respond to the request for academic accommodation or did not provide reasonable accommodation, the student should consult with the department/school/institute chair/director. If a mutually agreeable accommodation to complete course requirements prior to the course grade submission deadline cannot be achieved, the Associate Dean will become involved.  If academic accommodation is not granted, and the student receives word after the academic withdrawal deadline, the student may submit a petition to the Registrar's Office (undergraduate courses)/Graduate Registrar (graduate courses) for a final grade of WDN (Withdrawn) in the course(s).  If academic accommodation is not granted, and the student receives word prior to the academic withdrawal deadline, the student may elect to withdraw from the course(s).
  4. Furthermore, if academic accommodation is granted, but the student is unable to complete the accommodation according to the terms set out by the instructor as a result of further illness, injury or extraordinary circumstances beyond their control, the student may submit a petition to the Registrar's Office (undergraduate courses)/Graduate Registrar (graduate courses).

9.4 Master's Examinations

In addition to any examination which may be required in individual courses, or comprehensive examinations in required fields of specialisation, a master's candidate who is writing a thesis will be expected to undertake an oral defence of the thesis. When the degree is taken by course work, a comprehensive examination may be required. It is important to note that individual programs may have specific requirements.

9.5 Doctoral Examinations

Doctoral candidates may be asked to pass a qualifying examination at the beginning of their residency at Carleton University.

A comprehensive examination covering prescribed fields will normally be undertaken at least one year prior to the thesis defence. This examination (oral or written, or both) may include any material considered fundamental to a proper comprehension of the field of study.

After the thesis has been received and accepted for examination, a final oral examination on the subject of the thesis and related fields will be held.

The thesis examination must be conducted according to the principles and practices prescribed by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs at http://www5.carleton.ca/fgpa/thesis-requirements/. 

9.6 Unsatisfactory Comprehensive Grades

If the comprehensive examination is graded Unsatisfactory, the program may permit the candidate to repeat the examination. If the comprehensive examination is graded Unsatisfactory for a second time, students must make an appeal to remain in their program through their program graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs) to the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs.

10. Grading System

10.1 Letter Grades

Standing in a course is determined by the course instructor, subject to the approval of the faculty Dean. Standing in courses will be shown by alphabetical grades. The system of grades used, with corresponding grade points and the percentage conversion is below. Grade points indicated are for courses with 1.0 credit value. Where the course credit is greater or less than one credit, the grade points are adjusted proportionately.

Grade Point Equivalence Percentage Conversion
A+1290-100
A1185-89
A- 1080-84
B+977-79
B873-76
B-770-72
C+667-69
C563-66
C-460-62
D+357-59
D253-56
D-150-52
F0less than 50

In cases where the final examination is not written and was not explicitly a requirement to successfully complete the course, the cumulative grade earned on term work without the missing examination will be assigned.

If the grade conversion deviates from the percentage conversion presented above, the faculty member must notify the class in the course outline.

10.2 Other Grading Notations

 Other grades and notations in current use by the university are as follows:

AUDAudit. No academic credit. Indicates the course was not taken for academic credit, but that the student has the permission of the instructor to audit the course and has satisfied the conditions for successful audit of the course. AUD has no impact on the CGPA calculation.
CEXCurrent International Exchange. An interim notation.
CLPCurrent Letter of Permission. An interim notation.
CTNContinuing. No academic credit and no impact on the CGPA. Assigned by the Registrar’s Office to the first half of a course taught consecutively over two terms.
CURCurrent registration. An interim notation assigned by the Registrar’s Office to indicate the student is currently registered in the course.
DEFDeferred Final Examination and/or final course work. An interim notation administratively assigned by the Registrar’s Office upon approval of a request to write a deferred final examination or defer submission of final course work. DEF must be replaced by a final grade within the prescribed time or be replaced with F.
FFailure. The grade of F is assigned when the student has failed to meet the conditions of “satisfactory performance” defined in the Course Outline. F carries 0.0 grade points.
IPIn Progress – a notation (IP) assigned to a course by a faculty member when: At the undergraduate level, an undergraduate thesis or course has not been completed by the end of the period of registration. At the graduate level, a graduate thesis, research essay, independent research project or comprehensive examination has not been completed by the end of the period of registration. The IP notation may also be used at the graduate level when a research seminar has not been completed by the end of the period of registration provided the research seminar has been approved by Graduate Faculty Board as being eligible for the use of this notation. In the case of re-registration in any of the above courses, the IP notation will remain; a final grade will normally be assigned in the final period of registration. Where there is no re-registration in any of the above courses, the IP notation must be replaced with an appropriate notation or grade within the prescribed time period, or be replaced by a notation of WDN.
SATSatisfactory performance in an ungraded program requirement, option or course taken on Letter of Permission or International Exchange. SAT has no impact on the CGPA calculation.
UNSUnsatisfactory performance in an ungraded program requirement, option or course taken on a Letter of Permission or International Exchange. UNS has no impact on the CGPA calculation.
WDNWithdrawn. No academic credit, no impact on the CGPA. WDN is a permanent notation that appears on the official transcript for students who withdraw after the full fee adjustment date in each term (noted in the Academic Year section of the Calendar each term). Students may withdraw on or before the last day of classes.

10.3 Release of Grades

Students may access grades through the Carleton Central Student registration system at http://carleton.ca/registrar/registration as soon as the grades are available after the end of the fall and winter terms of the fall/winter session and after the end of the spring/summer session.

10.4 Transcripts

Students are advised that no official transcripts will be released by the University until all outstanding accounts have been paid.

11. Academic Standing

11.1 Qualifying-Year Program

Students should note that admission to the master's program from qualifying year is governed by the admission requirements in Section 2, Admission Requirements and Eligibility.

11.2 Master's Program

A grade of B- or better must normally be obtained in each course credited towards the master's degree. A candidate may, with the support of the departmental graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs) and the approval of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs, be allowed a grade of C+ in 1.0 credit. Some programs do not permit the C+ option and apply a B- minimum rule.

Full-Time Continuation

Full-time master's students who fail to achieve a weighted GPA of 7.0 after two terms of study, or to maintain it subsequently, will be required to withdraw from the program. In the event of special or extenuating circumstances, the student may apply through the program graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs) to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs for permission to continue in the program.

Part-Time Continuation

Part-time master's students who fail to achieve or maintain a weighted GPA of 7.0 after completing 2.0 credits, or to maintain it subsequently, will be required to withdraw from the program. In the event of special or extenuating circumstances, the student may apply through the program graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs) to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs for permission to continue in the program.

11.3 Doctoral Program

Doctoral students must obtain a grade of B- or better in each course credited towards the degree.

11.4 Departmental Evaluation

In addition to the above requirements, departments will undertake a periodic evaluation of a student's progress in his or her overall program to determine whether that progress is satisfactory. In the event that progress is deemed unsatisfactory, the program graduate supervisor may recommend to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs that the student be required to withdraw.

11.5 Religious Accommodation

Carleton University accommodates students who, by reason of religious obligation, must miss an examination, test, assignment deadline, laboratory, or other compulsory event.

Accommodation will be worked out directly and on an individual basis between the student and the instructor(s) involved. Students should make a formal request to the instructor(s) in writing for alternative dates and/or means of satisfying requirements. Such requests should be made during the first two weeks of any given academic term, or as soon as possible after a need for accommodation is known to exist. Instructors will make reasonable accommodation in a way that shall avoid academic disadvantage to the student.

Students unable to reach a satisfactory arrangement with their instructor(s) should contact the Office of Equity Services at http://www2.carleton.ca/equity/.

Instructors who have questions or wish to verify the nature of the religious event or practice involved should also contact this office.

12. Thesis Requirements

Guidelines for the preparation of graduate theses [http://carleton.ca/fgpa/thesis-requirements/] and information on the procedures for examination of graduate theses are available on the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs website.

12.1 General Remarks

The thesis is a major requirement of many master's and all doctoral programs and, in conjunction with the research for it, makes up at least one half of the time normally required for the program. The thesis must be expressed in a satisfactory literary form, consistent with the discipline concerned, and must display a scholarly approach to the subject and thorough knowledge of it. A critical review of previous work related to the subject should usually be provided.

Students will not be permitted to submit a thesis for which they have previously received a degree; however, with the permission of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs, they may incorporate into the thesis material that was included in a previous thesis.

12.2 Master's Thesis

The master's thesis should exhibit a competence in the research process by applying an existing body of knowledge in the critical analysis of a new question or of a specific problem or issue in a new setting. On the basis of that conceptual understanding and methodological competence, it should demonstrate at least one of the following:

  1. the development and support of a sustained argument in written form
  2. originality in the application of knowledge
Oral Examinations

Students are required to undertake an oral examination of the thesis. Please refer to Thesis Specifications, Section 12.5, Master's, for submission deadlines. The master's thesis will be examined by a board consisting of at least four members, including the thesis supervisor, the chair of the department concerned, an examiner from a department other than that of the candidate, and one additional member from the department concerned. The chair of the department concerned will announce the constitution of the examination board. See Thesis Examination Policy at http://carleton.ca/fgpa/thesis-requirements/.

Thesis Weight

Thesis weight must be identified at the time of admission. A change in the thesis weight at a later date requires the approval of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs.

12.3 Doctoral Thesis

The doctoral dissertation must report, in an organized and scholarly fashion, the results of original research. The thesis must be a contribution to knowledge, and must demonstrate the ability to conceptualize, design and implement research for the generation of new knowledge, applications, or understanding at the forefront of the discipline, and to adjust the research design or methodology in the light of unforeseen problems.

Oral Examinations

The thesis must be defended successfully at an oral examination. Please refer to Thesis Specifications, Section 12.5, Doctoral, for submission deadlines. The doctoral thesis will be examined by a board consisting of at least five members, including the thesis supervisor, an examiner from a department other than that of the candidate, the members of the candidate's advisory committee, and an external examiner who is a recognized authority on the subject of the thesis. The Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs, the Dean of the candidate's Faculty, and the chair/director of the candidate's department, institute or school are ex officio members of the board. The Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs appoints an independent chair of the board, who is not from the candidate's department, institute or school.

The Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs will announce the constitution of the examination board; both it and the thesis examination process are defined by the Thesis Examination Policy found at [http://carleton.ca/fgpa/thesis-requirements/].

Thesis Weight

Thesis weight must be identified at the time of admission. A change in the thesis weight at a later date requires the approval of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs. The work of each Ph.D. candidate will be assisted by an advisory committee of faculty members who will aid the candidate in their preparation for the final comprehensive examination, and assist in the evaluation of the thesis and its oral examination.

12.4 Integrated Thesis Policy

Many disciplines, especially in engineering and the sciences, accept a thesis consisting of student work based on published papers, conference proceedings, or papers awaiting publication. Known as the 'integrated article,'  'manuscript,' 'sandwich,' or 'chapter' thesis,  this  type  of  thesis contrasts with the monograph thesis  traditionally offered for examination. However, the same quality  and  ethical  standards  apply  to  each  thesis  type  and  the  authority  of  the  Thesis Examination Committee remains the same for both. Each individual academic unit decides the thesis format(s) suitable for its discipline.

A. Criteria for Integrated Article Thesis

The integrated article thesis is acceptable under the following conditions:

  • The integrated thesis must consist of a coherent account of a unified research project. It is not a collection of loosely connected papers. The student will provide a document that locates a body of work within the context of existing theoretical and methodological debates in the literature, identifies the contributions of the thesis research to that literature and indicates potential directions for further research based upon knowledge gained through the thesis research.
  • The thesis  must  be  original  and  present  the  student's own  work  completed  during  the program of study  for  which the thesis is being submitted. The student should be the sole author or principal author of any included materials. The student must have played a major or sole role in setting up and conducting the research, obtaining data and analyzing results, as well as preparing and writing the documents submitted for examination. In the case where co-authored articles are included, the rules and procedures itemized in "Section D" below must be adhered to.
  • The thesis must contain a statement from the thesis supervisor verifying the student's contribution to the originality of the material presented in the thesis and clarifying in what way the included materials became part of the thesis.
B. Integrated Article Thesis Format

Published articles which do not follow the traditional thesis formatting rules may be included as thesis chapters.

The body of an integrated article thesis should contain the following chapters:

  • Abstract
    The abstract includes a brief description of the subject matter and summarizes the main themes presented in the thesis.
  • Preface
    The preface must provide full bibliographical details for each article included in the thesis, as well as whether the article is reproduced in whole or in part.  In the case of a partially reproduced article, the preface must include a description of the changes that have been made to the published version. Use of copyrighted material must be acknowledged in the preface and tables and figures must have "Reprinted with permission of…" in their captions. See below "Section C" on copyrighted material. Students must also indicate how others are to cite material from this thesis. In the case where the thesis includes co-authored material, see rules and procedures for co-authored material in "Section D", below.
  • Introductory Chapter /Literature Review
    The introductory chapter provides a comprehensive review of the literature that establishes the student's familiarity with relevant work in the field; sets out the objectives of the thesis; places the research into the larger context of the candidate's discipline; and provides an overall thematic cohesiveness of the chapters (research papers) to the reader.
  • Methods Chapter
    The methods chapter should include an overview of the methodological approach used in the thesis and the common methodological assumptions or techniques that link the data chapters into a cohesive entity. A crucial feature of the scientific method is repeatability. The thesis must thus contain detailed descriptions of the experimental procedures followed to obtain results, so as to ensure that readers may be able to test the validity of research outcomes. In cases where such detailed descriptions do not appear in the integrated chapters, they must be included in the Methods Chapter. It is also acceptable to include this information in an Appendix, if the explanation is so protracted and tedious that it detracts from the readability of the main body of the text.       
  • Data (Research Paper) Chapters
    Normally, 3 or 4 articles form the body of the thesis and are divided into separate chapters. This work must be smoothly integrated into the flow of the thesis to produce a unified and appropriately sequenced argument. To do so may require some additions, deletions or re- writing of the original material. In cases where a published article is directly reproduced as a chapter without reformatting, additional pages at the beginning and the end of the chapter should be added to ensure logical and coherent transition between chapters.
  • Conclusion
    The conclusion  chapter  summarizes  and  critiques  the  research  topic  as  a  whole,  of-fers  an analysis of the limitations existing in the study and suggests potential areas of future research based on the thesis findings.
  • Bibliography and References and Citations
    Bibliographic format should be appropriate to the discipline. Methods of handling and listing references in the text vary. Because the body of the thesis contains chapters representing a separate piece of published work, each chapter may contain its own bibliography. Depending upon the situation, the literature review and/or summary chapter may also contain bibliographies to reflect individual citations made in those sections. Tables and figures should be included in appropriate chapters and numbered consecutively using the chapter number e.g. Chapter 2 would be numbered Table 2-1, 2-2 and so on. This practice avoids the table number repetition that may occur if separate published article material is used.
  • Appendices
    Appendices are optional. Normally, appendices are included to provide information that detracts from the readability of the main body of the text or to present data or information used in the thesis but not directly obtained by the thesis author.  For  example,  lengthy tables,  detailed explanation  of  laboratory  procedures,   and   computer  programs  may  be  included  in  the appendices.
Texts from Prior Theses

 A prior graduate thesis or sections of a prior graduate thesis cannot be included as an article in the Ph.D. thesis. The goal is to present a coherent body of research rather than a collation of every piece of work that the student has produced. In the case where doctoral research is closely related to work already completed at the master's level, students will be requested to include a statement attesting to the fact that no text in the thesis has appeared in another thesis.

C. Copyrighted Materials and Permissions

Use of copyrighted material must be acknowledged in the Preface and tables and figures must have "reprinted with permission of…" in their captions.

If the student wishes the work to include text that has already been published as a journal article or book chapter, the student must obtain permission from the publisher and include it along with the thesis as a separate document. Note that Library and Archives Canada request that permissions be submitted separately with the thesis.

In a case where a thesis includes papers co-authored by the student and others, the thesis must  state  explicitly  who  contributed  to  such  work  and  the  nature  and  extent  of  that contribution. The candidate must obtain permission from the co-authors to use this work and provide a statement of permission along with the thesis as a separate document. Each co-author must include in the statement of permission the extent of her/his contribution to the article(s) included in the thesis. See Section D below.

D. Rules and Procedures for Integrated Theses which Include Co-Authored Material

Co-authored publications are a common practice in many disciplines. The thesis, however, must represent the work of the student submitting it for credit. It is thus imperative that rules and procedures be followed to ensure that a student submitting an integrated thesis which includes co-authored article(s) be examined and evaluated on their own contribution to the collective publication(s).

Preface and additional documents

The preface must include a statement from the supervisor and the student indicating that the student was fully involved in setting up and conducting the research, obtaining data and analyzing results, as well as preparing and writing the material presented in the co-authored article(s) integrated in the thesis. There must also be a statement that clearly distinguishes the specific contributions of the student from those of all other collaborators or co-authors. The supervisor must include a statement which confirms the information provided by the student in the preface. Additionally, each co-author must confirm in a signed statement the extent of her/his contribution to the co-authored article(s) included in the thesis. These statements must be provided along with the thesis as separate documents. The objective of this requirement is to assure examiners that there has been full disclosure of collaborative activity. In providing these statements, all parties involved must take into consideration the rules and regulations of Carleton University's Academic Integrity policy.

Multiple use of the same co-authored article(s)

As a general rule, the same text from a co-authored published article should not be used in more than one thesis. In the case of students who have worked collaboratively on projects leading to a published article which comprises different sections of text with different single-author attribution, the relevant section(s) of the article may be included in different theses. In the case of a wholly collaborative article where individual contributions cannot be determined, the same article may be used in more than one thesis, but to a maximum of three theses. In cases where the same article appears in more than one thesis, each thesis must include a statement from all students and all supervisors involved confirming that all students collaborated equally in the production of the article(s). These statements must be provided along with the thesis as separate documents.

Issues of copyright must be addressed by the student as outlined in the copyright section above. The candidate must obtain permission from the co-authors to use this work and include a statement of permission along with the thesis as a separate document. Each co-author must include in the statement of permission the extent of her/his contribution to the article(s) included in the thesis.

E. Integrated Article Thesis Examinations

Article  publication  or  acceptance  of  publication  does  not  supercede  the  authority  or responsibility  of  the  Thesis  Examination  Committee  to  evaluate  the  thesis  during  the examination process and to recommend or require changes.

Thesis examination rules/policies and procedures are not changed to accommodate the integrated article thesis.

The oral examination concentrates on testing the candidate's knowledge as much as on questioning the written document.

12.5 Deadlines
 

Master's Thesis

Master's students expecting to graduate at the Spring Convocation must submit their supervisor-approved thesis, in examinable form, to the department by March 1. Master's students expecting to graduate at the Fall Convocation must submit their thesis by August 1. Master's students expecting to graduate at the Winter Graduation must submit their thesis by December 1. If the department requires further approvals, these must be obtained prior to the submission deadline. 

Doctoral Thesis

Ph.D. students expecting to graduate at the Spring Convocation must submit their supervisor-approved thesis, in examinable form, to the department by March 1. Ph.D. students expecting to graduate at the Fall Convocation must submit their thesis by August 1. Ph.D. students expecting to graduate at the Winter Graduation must submit their thesis by December 1. If the department requires further approvals, these must be obtained prior to the submission deadline. 

12.6 Specifications

  • Prior to the examination, the candidate must submit  the examinable version of the thesis, which must comply with the departmental requirements governing the form of the thesis, including methods of bibliographical entry and the use of diagrams and tables.
  • The examinable version of the thesis must be accompanied by a suitable abstract. The abstract of a master's thesis should not exceed 150 words, while the abstract of a doctoral thesis may be up to 350 words in length.
  • Regulations regarding style, pagination, certification, acceptance, abstracts, reproduction, electronic dissemination, and the constitution of the examining board will be prescribed by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs.
Master's Thesis

Students are expected to notify their supervisor and the chair of the department at least two weeks in advance of the date on which they intend to submit the completed thesis. The examinable thesis must be submitted to the department at least four weeks in advance of the intended date of examination. The thesis examination and defense will then be scheduled and the date will be announced at least two weeks in advance.

Doctoral Thesis

The candidate is expected to notify their supervisor and the chair of the department at least two weeks in advance of the date on which they intend to submit the completed thesis. The candidate is then expected to submit the examinable thesis to the department at least six weeks in advance of the intended date of examination. The thesis examination and defense will then be scheduled and the date will be announced by the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs at least four weeks in advance. The department, institute or school must forward the examinable thesis to the office of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs at least four weeks in advance of the actual date for the examination and defense.

12.7 Licence to the University and to Library and Archives Canada

In the interest of facilitating research by members of the Carleton community and by interested outsiders, and in consideration of their having been accepted as a graduate student at Carleton, the author of a thesis or dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree shall grant to the University a license to disseminate the thesis electronically, solely for the purpose of private study and research.

Students wishing to deposit their thesis with Library and Archives Canada and participate in electronic distribution of their research are advised to review the revised procedures available online http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/thesescanada/

It is understood that the author retains other publication rights, and that neither the thesis nor extensive extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's written permission.

12.8 Withholding of Thesis Deposition

If, at the time of submitting their thesis, students elect to protect any rights to immediate commercial publication, or to obtain a patent which may arise from their research, or to keep their thesis out of circulation, they may apply in writing to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs requesting that the thesis be withheld from deposit in the library:

  • for an additional period of three months, without reason;
  • for each additional period of six months, with reason (total period of restriction not to exceed two years).

A request for extension of the restriction must be submitted one month prior to the termination of the approved s period. Justification for extension of the restriction is required.

12.9 Degree Completion

A registered candidate who completes their degree requirements by depositing the thesis prior to the last day for withdrawal in any term (as specified in the academic schedule) is required to request formal withdrawal for refund purposes if they anticipate any refund of fees.

This applies to thesis or research essay registration.

13. Time Limits for Program Completion

13.1 General Remarks

There are maximum time limits for the completion of programs. Students may also be subject to time constraints prescribed by individual programs to ensure orderly and timely progress through their programs.

13.2 Master's Program
 

Full-time

All master's students admitted as full-time students must normally complete their degree requirements within two calendar years after the date of initial registration, unless their program states otherwise and regardless of any subsequent change of status to part-time. Terms of non-registration are equated to full-time registration terms when calculating the overall time to program completion.

Part-time

All master's students admitted as part-time students must normally complete their degree requirements within six calendar years after the date of initial registration, unless their program states otherwise. Terms of non-registration are equated to part-time registration terms when calculating the overall time to program completion. A change of a student's status from part-time to full-time status will result in a pro-rated reduction in the required time to completion for each subsequent term of full-time study.

Failure to complete the program within the prescribed time lines or failure to maintain continuous registration will require reevaluation of the student's entire program and may result in termination.

13.3 Doctoral Program
 

Full-time

All Ph.D. students admitted as full-time students and admitted on the basis of a master's degree (that is, with a program of 10.0 credits or the equivalent) must complete the Ph.D. degree requirements within five calendar years after the date of initial Ph.D. registration, regardless of any subsequent change of status to part-time. Terms of non-registration are equated to full-time registration terms when calculating the overall time to program completion.

Part-time

All Ph.D. students admitted as part-time students must complete the degree requirements within nine calendar years after the date of initial Ph.D. registration. Terms of non-registration are equated to part-time registration terms when calculating the overall time to program completion. A change of a student's status from part-time to full-time status will result in a pro-rated reduction in the required time to completion for each subsequent term of full-time study.

Failure to complete the program within the prescribed time lines or failure to maintain continuous registration will require reevaluation of the student's entire program and may result in termination.

13.4 Exemption from Time Limit

When exemption from registration for a term or terms has been approved by the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs, this period will be exempt from the overall time limit allowed for completion of the program. An administration charge for each term of exemption will be applied to the student's account.

For Exemption from Time Limit procedure/forms please visit http://gradstudents.carleton.ca/forms-policies/

13.5 Extension of Time Limit

Time limits are strictly enforced. An extension of a student's time to completion will be considered only when there is substantial evidence that the student has attempted to make regular and consistent progress toward completion of the degree requirements. A written request to extend the completion date must be submitted to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs one term before the normal time period to complete the degree expires. The request must be supported by the student's thesis supervisor and the program graduate supervisor/associate chair (graduate affairs). The request must include a plan of remaining work including the anticipated time of completion of the degree requirements. Each subsequent request to extend a student's completion date requires greater justification. Third requests for extensions are rarely, if ever, granted. Being employed full time is not in itself considered sufficient grounds for granting an extension.

An administrative charge for each term of extension will be applied to the student's account.

For Time Extension procedure/forms visit http://gradstudents.carleton.ca/wp-content/uploads/Academic-Change-Form.pdf.

14.0 Co-operative Education Policy

Co-operative Education is based on the principle that academic study combined with work periods is an effective method of professional preparation. Work periods at various points in the academic program allow students to acquire experience within their discipline. The Co-operative Education program is a complement to the graduate students’ academic studies. Students that are accepted into the co-op option must prepare a work-term report that meets the expectations of each individual discipline.

Application Requirements

Graduate students have their first opportunity to apply to the co-op program once they have begun the first term in their Master’s level program. The application must be completed via the Co-op and Career Services website before the end of the first term after beginning one of the degree programs which offers the co-op option. Students may also delay their participation until later in their degree, provided that they have a suitable number of credits remaining to complete their degree. These applications are reviewed and decisions made on a case-by-case basis.

Participation Requirements
 

Co-op Agreement

All graduate students must adhere to the policies which outline the requirements for participation in the Co-op Agreement. The Agreement can be located in the Co-op Resources section of MyCareer.

Communication with the Co-op Office

Graduate students must maintain regular contact with the co-op office during their job search and while on a work term. All email communication will be conducted via the students' Carleton email account.

Graduation with the Co-op Designation

In order to graduate with the co-op designation, graduate students must satisfy all requirements of the degree program in addition to co-op program requirements (successful completion of a minimum of two work terms).

Employment

Although every effort is made to ensure a sufficient number of job postings for all students enrolled in the co-op option of their degree program, no guarantee of employment can be made. Carleton’s co-op program operates a competitive job search process and is dependent upon current market conditions. Academic performance, skills, motivation, maturity, attitude and potential will determine whether a student is offered a job. It is the student’s responsibility to actively conduct a job search in addition to participation in the job search process operated by the co-op office. Students that do not successfully obtain a co-op work term are expected to continue with their academic studies. The summer term is the exception to this rule. Students should also note that hiring priority is given to Canadian citizens for co-op positions in the Federal Government of Canada.

Work Term Assessment and Evaluation

To obtain a Satisfactory grade for the co-op work term students must have:

1. A satisfactory work term evaluation by the co-op employer;

2. A satisfactory grade on the work term report.

Graduate students must submit a work term report at the completion of each four-month work term. Reports are due on the 16th of April, August, and December and students are notified of due dates through their Carleton email account.

Workplace performance will be assessed by the workplace supervisor. Should a student receive an unsatisfactory rating from their co-op employer, an investigation by the co-op program manager will be undertaken. An unsatisfactory employer evaluation does not preclude a student from achieving an overall satisfactory rating for the work term.

Voluntary Withdrawal from the Co-op Option

Graduate students may withdraw from the co-op option of their degree program during a study term ONLY. Students at work may not withdraw from the work term or the co-op option until s/he has completed the requirements of the work term.

Students are eligible to continue in their regular academic program provided that they meet the academic standards required for continuation.

Involuntary or Required Withdrawal from the Co-op Option

Graduate students may be required to withdraw from the co-op option of their degree program for one or any of the following reasons:

1. Failure to pay all co-op related fees;

2. Failure to actively participate in the job search process;

3. Failure to attend all interviews for positions to which the student has applied;

4. Declining more than one job offer during the job search process;

5. Continuing a job search after accepting a co-op position;

6. Failure to be registered in the Co-op Work Term course;

7. Dismissal from a work term by the co-op employer;

8. Leaving a work term without approval by the Co-op Manager;

9. Receipt of an unsatisfactory work term evaluation;

10. Submission of an unsatisfactory work term report;

Standing and Appeals

The Co-op and Career Services office administers the regulations and procedures that are applicable to the all co-op program options. All instances of a student’s failure during a work term or other issues directly related to their participation in the co-op option will be reported to the academic department.

While at Work

Graduate students will be registered in a Co-op Work Term course while at work.

Graduate students must be registered as full-time before they begin their co-op job search.

The student is permitted to register in 0.5 credit in addition to the Co-op Work Term course while on a work term. This course must be taken outside of working hours. If the course is only offered during work hours the student may request that the co-op office make an exception. Students must obtain the approval of the employer prior to submission and must be willing to make up the hours of work missed. At this time the department/student may request an exemption from continuous registration in their thesis.

If the student is in receipt of a Teaching Assistant the award will be deferred to a later term.

If the student is in receipt of an internal scholarship, this award remains active if the student registers in an additional 0.5 credit course, and is deferred to a later term otherwise.

Please note that external awards/scholarships will be issued/deferred based on the external agency criteria.

Graduate students may be permitted to finish their degree on a co-op work term provided they only have 0.5 credits remaining. The student must complete a request to the co-op office for consideration of approval.

International Students

All Graduate International Students are required to possess a Co-op Work Permit issued by Citizenship and Immigration Canada before they can begin working. It is illegal to work in Canada without the proper authorization. Students will be provided with a letter of support to accompany their application. Students must submit their application for their permit before being permitted to accept a work term position. Confirmation of a position will not be approved until a student can confirm they have received their permit and the expiry date. Students are advised to discuss the application process and requirements with the International Student Services Office.

Co-op Fees

Graduate students participating in the co-op option of their degree program are required to pay the co-op fees. For full details on how the co-op fees are assessed please review the Graduate Fees section of the Co-op and Career Services website: http://www1.carleton.ca/co-op/fees/graduate-fees/

15.0 Grade Review

Within one month of the release of grades or the announcement of examination by committee (comprehensive examination, research essay or thesis) results, a graduate student may request, through the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs, that one or more of their grades or results be reviewed. The results of examination by committee (including comprehensive, research essay or thesis examinations) will only be reviewed on procedural grounds. Grades for other courses will be reviewed through the submission of all or part of the written coursework to two re-readers. The identity of the student will remain confidential. The average grade of the re-readers will replace the original of the reviewed work. Parts of grades based on non-written work (e.g., participation) will not be reviewed. The administration fee must accompany the review request. The process for the conduct of reviews can be found at http://gradstudents.carleton.ca/wp-content/uploads/Grade-Appeal-Procedures.pdf

Note:  The review process will not take place if the fee is not remitted. If the grade is raised, the administration fee is refundable.

16.0 Program Review

A graduate student has the right to request a review of decisions made concerning their status or any other ruling relating to their program. All such requests are to be made in writing to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs.

17.0 Records Retention Policy

Since 2005 the University has implemented a records retention policy which provides for the destruction of student file folders and their contents after a period of five years has elapsed since the last registration. This policy applies to those students who are formally admitted and registered in degree programs. Further information on this policy can be obtained by contacting the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs.

18.0 Academic Integrity

The complete policy is available at: http://carleton.ca/senate/wp-content/uploads/Academic-Integrity-Policy1.pdf

19. Offenses of Conduct

19.1 Discrimination and Harassment

The University has in place policies and procedures to deal with allegations of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment. These are outlined in detail in the Carleton University Human Rights Policies and Procedures, effective May 1, 2001 and which can be found on the Carleton Web site under Equity Services.

Unacceptable conduct is outlined in the policy and includes discrimination or harassment based on race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, creed, political affiliation or belief, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, marital status, family status, or disability/handicap within the meaning of the Ontario Human Rights Code. Unacceptable conduct also includes threatening, stalking and unwelcome communication either in person or through electronic or other means. For the three policy sections below, the definition of prohibited behaviour is described in the italicized section which follows.

From the Anti-Racism and Ethnocultural Relations Policy'6. The University prohibits discrimination and harassment, including conduct on the basis of race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin and citizenship that:'

From the Gender Equality Policy'6. The University prohibits discrimination and harassment, including conduct on the basis of sex, gender or gender identity that:'

From the Sexual Orientation Equality Policy. The University prohibits discrimination and harassment, including conduct on the basis of sexual orientation or perceived sexual orientation that:'

  1. Is abusive, demeaning or threatening including behaviour such as name calling; derogatory remarks, gestures and physical attacks; or display of derogatory or belittling pictures and graffiti; or
  2. Biases administrative and appointment decisions, employment and workplace practices, tenure, promotion, appointment, leave and salary determinations; or
  3. Biases academic decisions such as admissions, grading, the application of regulations and requirements and scheduling of academic activities; or
  4. Misuses power, authority or influence; or
  5. Discriminates in the provision of goods and services, or access to premises, accommodation and other facilities.'

From the Sexual Harassment Prevention Policy. Sexual harassment occurs when an individual engages in sexually harassing behaviour or inappropriate conduct of a sexual nature that is known, or ought reasonably be known, to be unwelcome, and that:

  1. Interferes with the academic or employment performance or participation in a University-related activity for the person harassed; and/or
  2. Is associated with an expressed or implied promise of employment-related or academic-related consequence for the person harassed (including reward, reprisal or condition of study or employment); and/or
  3. Provides a basis for academic or employment decisions affecting the person harassed; and/or
  4. Creates an abusive, demeaning, or threatening study, work or living environment for the person harassed; and/or
  5. Excludes the person harassed from rights and/or privileges to which they are entitled.

Sexually harassing behaviour may be physical, verbal or psychological. It may be conveyed directly or by telephone, writing or electronic means. Examples of inappropriate sexual conduct include:

  1. Unwelcome sexual solicitations, flirtations or advances; sexually suggestive comments, gestures, threats or verbal abuse;
  2. Unwarranted touching or physical contact of a sexual nature, coerced consent to sexual contact, or sexual assault;
  3. Inappropriate display or transmission of sexually suggestive or explicit pictures, posters, objects or graffiti;
  4. Leering, compromising invitations, or demands for sexual favours;
  5. Degrading, demeaning or insulting sexual comment or content, including unwelcome remarks, taunting, jokes or innuendo about a person's body, sexuality, sexual orientation or sexual conduct;
  6. Misuse of position or authority to secure sexual favours;
  7. Persistent, unwanted attention or requests for sexual contact after a consensual relationship has ended; or
  8. A course of sexualized comment or conduct that interferes with the dignity or privacy of an individual or group.'

Enforcement of this policy is carried out according to the procedures established in the policy. The procedures include the provision of advice and information to complainants and respondents and allow for various methods of informal resolution, including mediation.

Students with concerns regarding discrimination, harassment, stalking, sexist or racist behaviour, or any other prohibited action as outlined in the Human Rights Policy, should call or meet with a member of Equity Services for advice and guidance on how to handle the situation. This service is confidential and does not compel the student to take any further action.

Formal complaints must be made in writing and directed to the Dean or Vice President responsible for the area where the complaint took place. Staff in Equity Services are available to assist with the preparation of a formal complaint. Complaints must be made within 12 months after the last alleged incident of discrimination or harassment unless exceptional circumstances apply in which case the University Secretary may grant an extension of up to an additional 12 months.

The procedure for formal complaints is outlined below:

  1. An allegation shall be made in writing to the Dean of the Faculty in which the program to which the respondent has been admitted belongs or, in the circumstances where the respondent has not been admitted to a program, to the Dean of the Faculty where the majority of courses in which the respondent has registered are administered. An allegation against a student in residence when made by another student in residence which involves the complainant's enjoyment of her/his accommodation shall be made to the Vice-President (Academic). The Dean, or the Vice-President (Academic), as the case may be, shall cause to have an investigation conducted and, upon receipt of the report of the investigation, shall either
    1. dismiss the allegation on the grounds of insufficient evidence or lack of jurisdiction by the University, or
    2. accept that the allegation is founded and seek the agreement of the respondent to a remedy, or
    3. refer the matter to the President. A Dean's dismissal of the allegation may be appealed, within ten working days, to the Vice-President (Academic) who may, in turn, either
      1. again dismiss the allegation, or
      2. accept that the allegation is founded and propose a remedy to the respondent, or
      3. refer the matter to the President. In the case of students in residence, where the original allegation has been made to the Vice-President (Academic) and is dismissed, appeal shall be directly to the President who may either
        1. again dismiss the allegation, or
        2. accept that the allegation is founded and propose a remedy to the respondent, or
        3. refer the matter to a tribunal appointed by the Senate.
  2. In the instance where the matter has been referred to the President, the latter shall decide whether or not the University shall conduct a hearing before a tribunal appointed by the Senate.

    If the allegation is proven, the tribunal shall decide upon one of the following sanctions:

    The student may be:
    1. expelled;
    2. suspended for a period of time from all studies at the University;
    3. restricted in his/her use of University facilities; and/orgiven a reprimand.

      Should the President decide not to conduct a hearing before a tribunal, the allegation shall be deemed to have been dismissed, but the President shall give written reasons for such a decision, and these reasons shall be communicated to the parties involved.
  3. In the instance where the complainant wants redress from the University without the involvement of the respondent, or where the respondent is unknown or is not a member of the University community, and/or where there is a claim that the University has failed or has been negligent in providing a safe, non-hostile environment, the allegation of an offence shall be made in writing to the President, who shall cause an investigation to be conducted. Upon receipt of the report of the investigation, the President may order any relief he/she deems fit, and shall give written reasons for the decision; which reasons shall be communicated to the complainant.

Information about procedure governing tribunals is available from the Clerk of Senate.

20. Appeals and Petitions

20.1 Criteria and Procedures

Assuming that a graduate student has exhausted all avenues of appeal and petition with the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs (questions regarding the appeals process can be directed to the Office of the Dean at 613-520-2518), a graduate student may appeal the decision of the University to deny the award of degree or the required withdrawal of the student to the Senate upon certain specific grounds.

Such grounds are the allegation by the student that the student has been denied a degree or forced to withdraw because of some mistake, error, or improper conduct by the University, its officers, or employees.

A graduate student may petition the Senate to grant a degree or to stay a decision of required withdrawal on compassionate grounds.

Such appeals and petitions must be submitted in writing, within ninety days of receipt by the student of the decision which is to be appealed or petitioned, to the Clerk of Senate.

21. Graduation

21.1 Conferring of Degrees

On the recommendation of the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs and with the approval of the Senate of the University, degrees are conferred by the Chancellor in the spring and fall of each year.

21.2 Application Deadlines

Candidates may have their degrees certified in February each year; they must apply by December 1. Students expecting to graduate at the Spring Convocation must apply for graduation in the Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs office by March 1. Those expecting to graduate at the Fall Convocation must apply by September 1.