Psychology (PSYC)

Psychology (PSYC) Courses

Department of Psychology

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences


PSYC 1001 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Psychology I

A survey of topics associated with psychology's role as a natural science, including neuroscience, cognition, and learning.
Precludes additional credit for PSYC 1000.
Lecture three hours a week.

PSYC 1002 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Psychology II

A survey of topics associated with psychology's role as a social science, including social psychology, personality and abnormal psychology.
Precludes additional credit for PSYC 1000.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001.
Lecture three hours a week.

PSYC 2001 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology

A general introduction to research methodologies employed within contemporary psychology. Topics covered include research designs (experimental, quasi-experimental) and techniques (observations, surveys), basic descriptive statistics, and how to interpret and report research findings.
Also listed as NEUR 2001.
Precludes additional credit for PSYC 2000.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1002.
Lecture three hours a week.

PSYC 2002 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Statistics in Psychology

A general introduction to statistical techniques employed within contemporary Psychology. Topics covered include basic data analysis using descriptive and inferential statistics (t-tests, ANOVA, correlation, chi-square).
Also listed as NEUR 2002.
Precludes additional credit for GEOG 2006.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, PSYC 1002, and PSYC 2001.

PSYC 2003 [0.5 credit]
Origins of Modern Psychology

Survey of the evolution of psychology in Europe and North America, with an emphasis on psychology as a specialized area of knowledge and practice in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Precludes additional credit for PSYC 2300.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1002.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 2009 [0.5 credit]
Psychology Research Laboratory

Laboratory for experimental research methods in psychology. Covers research design, collecting, analyzing, and summarizing data, and writing research reports. Intended to be a practical compliment to PSYC 2001 and PSYC 2002.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, PSYC 1002 and PSYC 2001.

PSYC 2100 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Social Psychology

Introduction to contemporary theory and research in social psychology. Areas covered include attitude structure and change, small groups and social learning.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 2150.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1002.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 2301 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Health Psychology

Using a multidisciplinary approach, this introductory course outlines the reciprocal interactions among physical health and illness, and psychological factors, including emotional well-being, coping and appraisal processes.
Precludes additional credit for PSYC 3406.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1002.
Lectures and seminars three hours a week.

PSYC 2307 [0.5 credit]
Human Neuropsychology I

Introduction to the principles and research techniques used to understand the relationships amongst brain, behaviour and cognition in humans. Emphasis will be given to the concepts and methods used to study topics in the core research areas of the Psychology Department.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1002.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 2400 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Forensic Psychology

Forensic psychology, including a critical review of theories, methods, and research findings. Topics covered may include development of offending, eyewitness testimony, victim studies, risk assessment, offender rehabilitation, offender classification, and police studies.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1002.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 2500 [0.5 credit]
Foundations of Developmental Psychology

Basic principles of developmental psychology with a concentration on theories and methods. Emphasis is on the psychology of childhood.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1002.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 2600 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to the Study of Personality

Introduction to the study of personality. Consideration of problems, methods and theories.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1002.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 2700 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Cognitive Psychology

Introduction to cognitive processes, including a survey of theories, issues, methods and findings. Topics covered may include pattern recognition, attention, imagery, learning (animal and human), memory, language, and thinking.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1002.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 2800 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Human Factors

Theoretical foundation, philosophy and practical application of techniques for analyzing from a psychological perspective how people interact with designed environments. A major goal is to determine how these environments should be designed to suit human capabilities.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1002.
Lecture three hours a week.

PSYC 3000 [1.0 credit]
Design and Analysis in Psychological Research

Techniques in data analysis, probability theory, sampling distribution theory and the ideas and procedures of estimation, classical and Bayesian approaches to hypothesis testing, linear regression and curve fitting, distribution free hypothesis testing, and the analysis of variance methods in experimental design. Limited enrolment. Intended for Honours students in Psychology.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2001, PSYC 2002, and third-year standing.
Lectures and tutorial four hours a week.

PSYC 3100 [1.0 credit]
Social Psychology (Honours Seminar)

Analysis of historical and contemporary developments in social psychology theory, research and methodology. Students may be required to complete independent research projects. Intended for Honours students.
Prerequisite(s): enrolment in Honours Psychology with a CGPA of 9.00 or higher in the major; PSYC 2001 and PSYC 2002, PSYC 2100, third-year standing and permission of the Department.
Lectures, seminars and tutorials six hours a week.

PSYC 3101 [0.5 credit]
Applied Social Psychology

Analysis of one or more social problems from the point of view of social psychology. The problems studied vary from year to year and may include war and peace, prejudice and discrimination, gender roles, politics and social change, leisure and quality of working life.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2100.
Lectures and seminars three hours a week.

PSYC 3102 [0.5 credit]
Cognitive Processes in Social Psychology

In-depth coverage of one or more sub-areas of social psychology introduced in PSYC 2100. Topics may include attitudes, impression formation, attribution of social causality, decision making, and social judgment.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2100.
Lectures and seminars three hours a week.

PSYC 3103 [0.5 credit]
Group Processes in Social Psychology

In-depth coverage sub-area(s) of social psychology introduced in PSYC 2100. Topics may include interaction in the dyad, coalition formation in larger groups, history and theory of small group research, North American, West-European and East-European models of group behaviour, and training groups in industry.
Also listed as SOWK 3103.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2100.
Lectures and seminars three hours a week.

PSYC 3105 [0.5 credit]
Organizational Psychology

Introduction to the study and practice of industrial/organizational psychology. Representative topics will be drawn from the areas of work behaviour, work motivation, work stress, personnel selection, performance appraisal, human factors, conflict, leadership, and organizational change.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2100.
Lecture and seminar, 3 hours per week.

PSYC 3300 [1.0 credit]
Health and Illness (Honours Seminar)

Theoretical and empirical approaches within the psychology of health and illness. A multidisciplinary perspective includes the interaction of biological, developmental, personality, and social factors and their influence on physical health, well-being, and illness. Students may be required to complete independent research projects.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in Honours Psychology with a CGPA of 9.00 or higher in the major; PSYC 2001 and PSYC 2002; one of PSYC 2301 or PSYC 2307; one of PSYC 2100, PSYC 2500, or PSYC 2600, and permission of the Department.
Lectures, seminars, and laboratory tutorials six hours a week.

PSYC 3301 [0.5 credit]
Sport and Performance Psychology

How psychological processes influence outcomes across sport and performance environments. Topics may include self-confidence, goal-setting, arousal regulation, imagery, group dynamics, burnout, injury recovery, and how person and situational factors affect the pursuit of excellence.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2100, PSYC 2500 or PSYC 2600.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 3302 [0.5 credit]
Positive Psychology

A review of theoretical, historical, and empirical scholarship in positive psychology. Drawing widely across traditional sub-disciplines, content focuses on human strengths, well-being, resilience, and virtue to understand internal, external, and developmental contributors to health and happiness.
Prerequisite(s): one of PSYC 2100, PSYC 2301, PSYC 2500 or PSYC 2600.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 3307 [0.5 credit]
Human Neuropsychology II

Organization of the human cerebral cortex and its relationship to behaviour and thought. Principles of cortical function and techniques used to discover them; assessment of the major functional characteristics of the frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes, cortical asymmetry and brain damage.
Precludes additional credit for PSYC 3207 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2307 or NEUR 2200.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 3400 [1.0 credit]
Forensic Psychology (Honours Seminar)

Theoretical and research methodologies in the study of forensic psychology are examined through a detailed consideration of selected topics. Students may be required to complete independent research projects.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in the Honours Psychology program with a CGPA of 9.00 in the Major; PSYC 2001, PSYC 2002, PSYC 2400 and permission of the department.

PSYC 3402 [0.5 credit]
Criminal Behaviour

Psychosocial approaches to the classification and treatment of offenders; theories and research relevant to selected patterns of law breaking and selected offender types; the effectiveness of offender treatment.
Prerequisite(s): one of PSYC 2100, PSYC 2400, or PSYC 2600.
Lectures and seminars three hours a week.

PSYC 3403 [0.5 credit]
Addiction

Neurobiological and social bases of drug and behavioural addictions. Contemporary theoretical approaches to addiction; approaches to current prevention and treatment.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, PSYC 1002 and one of PSYC 2301, PSYC 2307, PSYC 2400, or NEUR 2200.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 3405 [0.5 credit]
Psychology of Motivation and Emotion

Historical review of the concepts of motivation and emotion. Examination of such current concepts as anxiety, stress and depression, among the emotions, and obesity, sexual behaviour and the need to achieve, among the motivations.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1002.
Lectures and seminars three hours a week.

PSYC 3500 [1.0 credit]
Developmental Psychology (Honours Seminar)

The major theoretical and empirical approaches within developmental psychology are examined through a detailed consideration of selected topics. Students may be required to complete independent research projects. Intended for Honours students.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in the Honours Psychology program with a CGPA of 9.00 or higher in the Major; PSYC 2001, PSYC 2002, PSYC 2500, and permission of the Department.
Lectures, seminars and laboratory tutorials six hours a week.

PSYC 3505 [0.5 credit]
Exceptional Children

An overview of childhood exceptionalities including intellectual differences, communication disorders, sensory and physical impairments, developmental and behavioural problems.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2500.
Lectures and seminars three hours a week.

PSYC 3506 [0.5 credit]
Cognitive Development

Human cognitive development is examined with a focus on memory, thinking and language through the life span. Topics may include perceptual and language development, emergent literacy, development of strategies and development of reading and arithmetic skills.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2500 or PSYC 2700.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 3507 [0.5 credit]
Social Development

The development of the individual is examined with a focus on social cognition and social behaviour. Topics may include the role of temperament in development, the role of parents, siblings and peers in social/emotional development, the development of prosocial and aggressive behaviour, moral development and the development of self and other understanding.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2500.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 3508 [0.5 credit]
Child Language

Milestones associated with the development of grammatical,pragmatic and metalinguistic competence from birth to about age ten, and the relative contributions of the environment, cognitive development and inborn knowledge to this development.
Also listed as LING 3603.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 2603 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LALS 1000 or LALS 1001 or LING 1001 or PSYC 2700 and second-year standing, or permission of the instructor.
Lectures three hours per week.

PSYC 3509 [0.5 credit]
Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood

The physical, cognitive, social and moral development of adolescents and emerging adults in multiple contexts including family, peers, media and culture. Major theories and contemporary issues and concerns.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2500.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 3600 [1.0 credit]
Personality (Honours Seminar)

Theories of personality and current controversies in the research literature. Research questions are developed and addressed by designing and conducting experiments to find answers to issues in personality psychology.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in the Psychology Honours program with a CGPA of 9.00 or higher in the Major; PSYC 2001, PSYC 2002, and PSYC 2600, and permission of the Department.
Lectures, seminars and laboratory tutorials six hours a week.

PSYC 3603 [0.5 credit]
Psychology of Women

An examination of the literature on the psychology of women. Topics to be considered include: theories of female personality development, sex differences in ability and personality, biological influences on female behaviour, female sexuality, sex roles, women's roles throughout the life span.
Prerequisite(s): one of PSYC 2100, PSYC 2500, or PSYC 2600.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 3604 [0.5 credit]
Abnormal Psychology

History of the concept of behavioural abnormality. Theory and selected research dealing with the nature and etiology of behavioural abnormality.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2600 or PSYC 2500.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 3606 [0.5 credit]
Issues in Personality

Topics selected from areas of interest in Personality. When offered, detailed topic descriptions are available from the departmental office prior to registration.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2001, PSYC 2002, and PSYC 2600.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 3700 [1.0 credit]
Cognition (Honours Seminar)

Issues and research methodologies in the study of cognitive processes involved in perception, attention, language, reasoning, problem solving, decision making, human learning, and memory. Major theoretical issues and empirical studies are explored.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in the Honours Psychology program with a CGPA of 9.00 in the Major; PSYC 2001, PSYC 2002, PSYC 2700, and permission of the Department.
Lectures, seminars, and laboratory tutorials six hours a week.

PSYC 3702 [0.5 credit]
Perception

A consideration of data and theory concerning perceptual processes. Discussion of psychophysical methodology, perception of form and space and perceptual learning.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 and PSYC 1002.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 3709 [0.5 credit]
Language Processing and the Brain

Introduction to adult language processing and neurolinguistics. Psychological processes underlying speech production and perception, word recognition and sentence processing. Biological foundation and neuro-cognitive mechanisms of language. Experimental techniques and methodologies of current psycholinguistic studies.
Also listed as LING 3601.
Precludes additional credit for LALS 2601 and LALS 3601 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): LALS 1000 or LALS 1001 or LING 1001 or PSYC 2700 and second-year standing, or permission of the instructor.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 3901 [0.5 credit]
Practicum in Community Psychology

Through seven-hour-a-week field placements and regular class forums, students pursue personal learning objectives concerning the application of psychology within the community. A term paper integrates experiential knowledge gained in the placement with theoretical and empirical knowledge gained from the literature review.
Prerequisite(s): open to third- and fourth-year Psychology students with permission of the Department.

PSYC 3902 [0.5 credit]
Practicum in Community Psychology

Through seven-hour-a-week field placements and regular class forums, students pursue personal learning objectives concerning the application of psychology within the community. A term paper integrates experiential knowledge gained in the placement with theoretical and empirical knowledge gained from the literature review.
Prerequisite(s): open to third- and fourth-year Psychology students with permission of the Department.

PSYC 4001 [0.5 credit]
Special Topics in Psychology

Each section of PSYC 4001 deals with a different topic. Topics change yearly. Students may register in more than one section of PSYC 4001 but can register in each section only once.
Prerequisite(s): each section will have its own.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 4300 [0.5 credit]
History and Theory of Psychology: Selected Topics

Topics may include the history of a particular period, the history of a content area or issues related to theory in psychology.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2003 and third-year standing.
Lectures and seminars three hours a week.

PSYC 4402 [0.5 credit]
Police Psychology

Critical examination of theory and empirical research in the area of police psychology. Topics covered may include police culture, police selection, police suicide, police personality, stress debriefing, fitness evaluations, police training, crisis negotiations, and investigative techniques.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2400 and fourth-year standing.
Lecture and seminar three hours per week.

PSYC 4403 [0.5 credit]
Female Offenders

Feminist and social learning approaches to the assessment and treatment of female offenders. Theories and research relevant to selected patterns of law breaking and selected female offender types.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 3402 and fourth-year standing.
Seminars three hours a week.

PSYC 4404 [0.5 credit]
Sex Offenders

Theory and research concerning the etiology and maintenance of sexual offending; assessment, treatment, and management of sex offenders. Introduction to fundamental issues and controversies in the area.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2400, PSYC 3402, and fourth-year standing.
Seminars three hours a week.

PSYC 4500 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychology

Discussion of important current research in developmental psychology. In-depth exploration of theoretical and empirical issues related to selected topics in developmental psychology. The specific content for this course will vary from year to year.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing, and one of PSYC 3500, PSYC 3505, PSYC 3506 or PSYC 3507.
Lecture and seminar three hours a week.

PSYC 4703 [0.5 credit]
Cognition and Instruction

General theories of skill and knowledge acquisition as they relate to learning in specific subject matter areas, cognitive analyses of talks and performances that are instructionally relevant, and cognitive-theoretical analyses of instructional interventions.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing, PSYC 2001, PSYC 2002, and PSYC 2700.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 4704 [0.5 credit]
Psychology and Language

The perception and production of language will be covered from a psychological perspective. Topics may include the biology of language, speech perception, word recognition, reading, text comprehension, and language development.
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 2700.
Lecture and seminar three hours a week.

PSYC 4800 [0.5 credit]
Aspects of Product Design Methodology

Important issues in designing successful computerized products, including design guidelines, usability testing and user-needs analysis. Experienced designers and researchers from industry participate.
Also listed as IMD 3001.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSYC 4900 [0.5 credit]
Independent Study

A reading or research course for selected students who wish to investigate a particular topic of interest. Normally students may not offer more than one credit of independent study in their total program.
Prerequisite(s): Third or fourth-year standing and permission of the Department.

PSYC 4902 [0.5 credit]
Independent Study

A reading or research course for selected students who wish to investigate a particular topic of interest. Normally students may not offer more than one credit of independent study in their total program.
Prerequisite(s): Third or fourth-year standing and permission of the Department.

PSYC 4907 [1.0 credit]
Thesis for B.Sc. with Honours in Psychology

Open to all candidates for the B.Sc. degree with Honours in Psychology. A thesis project is conducted under the direct supervision of a Faculty Adviser from the Department of Psychology.
Precludes additional credit for PSYC 4906.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing in Psychology with a major CGPA of 9.0; PSYC 3000; one of PSYC 3100, PSYC 3200, PSYC 3300, PSYC 3400, PSYC 3500, PSYC 3600, or PSYC 3700; and permission of the Department.
Lectures as scheduled by the instructor; other hours as arranged with the Faculty Adviser.

PSYC 4908 [1.0 credit]
Thesis for B.A. with Honours in Psychology

Open to all candidates for the B.A. (Honours) in Psychology. A thesis project is conducted under the direct supervision of a Faculty Adviser from the Department of Psychology.
Precludes additional credit for PSYC 4905.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing in Psychology with a major CGPA of 10.0, PSYC 3000; one of PSYC 3100, PSYC 3200, PSYC 3300, PSYC 3400, PSYC 3500, PSYC 3600 or PSYC 3700; and permission of the Department.
Lectures as scheduled by the instructor; other hours as arranged with the Faculty Adviser.

PSYC 4909 [1.0 credit]
Project for B.Sc. with Honours in Psychology

Within the context of an active learning environment, students develop a variety of oral presentations and written documents that may include annotated bibliographies, essays, presentation slides, and posters. Each project is focused on an area of psychological research that is of interest to the student.
Precludes additional credit for PSYC 4906 (no longer offered), PSYC 4907, and PSYC 4908.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing in B.Sc. (Honours) in Psychology, PSYC 3000, 1.0 additional credit in Psychology above the 2000-level.

PSYC 4910 [1.0 credit]
Project for B.A. with Honours in Psychology

Within the context of an active learning environment, students develop a variety of oral presentations and written documents that may include annotated bibliographies, essays, presentation slides, and posters. Each project is focused on an area of psychological research that is of interest to the student.
Precludes additional credit for PSYC 4905 (no longer offered), PSYC 4907 and PSYC 4908.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing in B.A. (Honours) in Psychology, PSYC 3000, 1.0 additional credit in Psychology above the 2000-level.

Summer session: some of the courses listed in this Calendar are offered during the summer. Hours and scheduling for summer session courses will differ significantly from those reported in the fall/winter Calendar. To determine the scheduling and hours for summer session classes, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Not all courses listed are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for the current session and to determine the term of offering, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

December 15, 2014 10:21 AM