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Department of Geography and Environmental Studies
(Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences)
B349 Loeb Bldg.
613-520-2561
http://carleton.ca/geography/environmental-studies

This section presents the requirements for programs in:

Program Requirements

Bachelor of Arts

Environmental Studies
B.A. Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (12.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit from:1.0
ISCI 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to the Environment
ENST 1020 [0.5]
People, Places and Environments
GEOG 1010 [0.5]
Global Environmental Systems
2.  1.0 credit from: 1.0
FYSM 1100 [1.0]
Sustainable Environments
FYSM 1101 [1.0]
Location is Everything
FYSM 1107 [1.0]
Social Justice and the City
3.  2.0 credits in:2.0
ENST 2000 [0.5]
Nature, Environment and Society: Theoretical Perspectives
ENST 2001 [0.5]
Sustainable Futures: Environmental Challenges and Solutions
ISCI 2000 [0.5]
Natural Laws
ISCI 2002 [0.5]
Human Impacts on the Environment
4.  1.0 credit in:1.0
ENST 2005 [0.5]
Introduction to Qualitative Research
ENST 2006 [0.5]
Introduction to Quantitative Research
5.  1.0 credit in:1.0
ENST 3000 [0.5]
Environmental Studies Colloquium
ENST 3022 [0.5]
Environmental and Natural Resources
6.  0.5 credit in:0.5
PHIL 2380 [0.5]
Introduction to Environmental Ethics
7.  1.0 credit from:1.0
ECON 3804 [0.5]
Environmental Economics
GEOG 3206 [0.5]
Health, Environment, and Society
GEOG 3209 [0.5]
Sustainability and Environment in the South
GEOG 3501 [0.5]
Geographies of the Canadian North
HUMR 3503 [0.5]
Global Environmental Justice
LAWS 3800 [0.5]
Law of Environmental Quality
PHIL 3380 [0.5]
Environments, Technology and Values
PSCI 3801 [0.5]
Environmental Politics
RELI 3710 [0.5]
Religions and the Environment
TSES 3002 [0.5]
Energy and Sustainability
8.  0.5 credit from:0.5
ENST 3900 [0.5]
Honours Field Course
GEOG 3030 [0.5]
Regional Field Excursion
9.  0.5 credit in:0.5
ENST 4000 [0.5]
Environmental Studies Seminar
10.  0.5 credit from:0.5
ENST 4006 [0.5]
Environmental Policy Analysis
GEOG 4022 [0.5]
Seminar in People, Resources and Environmental Change
GEOG 4023 [0.5]
Seminar in Special Topics on the City
GEOG 4004 [0.5]
Environmental Impact Assessment
GEOG 4050 [0.5]
Environmental and Geographic Education
11.  1.0 credit in:1.0
a) Thesis stream
1.0 credit from:
ENST 4906 [1.0]
Honours Research Project
ENST 4907 [1.0]
Honours Research Essay
or
b) Course stream
1.0 credit in Approved Environmental Studies Electives at the 4000-level
12.  0.5 credit from:0.5
ENST 4001 [0.5]
Environmental Studies Practicum I
ENST 4002 [0.5]
Environmental Studies Practicum II
13.  1.0 credit in Approved Environmental Studies Electives at the 3000-level or above1.0
14.  0.5 credits in Approved Environmental Studies Electives0.5
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (8.0 credits)
15.  8.0 credits in free electives8.0
Total Credits20.0

Note: It may be necessary to use some of the free elective credits to fulfill prerequisite requirements for courses in the Major.

Environmental Studies
B.A. General (15.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (8.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit from:1.0
ISCI 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to the Environment
GEOG 1010 [0.5]
Global Environmental Systems
GEOG 1020 [0.5]
People, Places and Environments
2.  1.0 credit from:1.0
FYSM 1100 [1.0]
Sustainable Environments
FYSM 1101 [1.0]
Location is Everything
FYSM 1107 [1.0]
Social Justice and the City
3.  2.0 credits in:2.0
ENST 2000 [0.5]
Nature, Environment and Society: Theoretical Perspectives
ENST 2001 [0.5]
Sustainable Futures: Environmental Challenges and Solutions
ISCI 2000 [0.5]
Natural Laws
ISCI 2002 [0.5]
Human Impacts on the Environment
4.  1.0 credit from:1.0
ENST 2005 [0.5]
Introduction to Qualitative Research
ENST 2006 [0.5]
Introduction to Quantitative Research
GEOM 1004 [0.5]
Maps, Satellites and the Geospatial Revolution
5.  0.5 credit in:0.5
PHIL 2380 [0.5]
Introduction to Environmental Ethics
6.  1.0 credit in:1.0
ENST 3000 [0.5]
Environmental Studies Colloquium
ENST 3022 [0.5]
Environmental and Natural Resources
7.  0.5 credit in Approved Environmental Studies Electives0.5
8.  1.0 credit in Approved Environmental Studies Electives at the 3000-level or above1.0
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (7.0 credits)
9.  7.0 credits in free electives.7.0
Total Credits15.0

Minor in Environmental Studies

Open to all undergraduate students not in Environmental Studies programs.

Minor in Environmental Studies (4.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit from:1.0
and
GEOG 1010 [0.5]
Global Environmental Systems
or GEOM 1004 [0.5]
Maps, Satellites and the Geospatial Revolution
or FYSM 1100 [1.0]
Sustainable Environments
or FYSM 1101 [1.0]
Location is Everything
or FYSM 1107 [1.0]
Social Justice and the City
2.  1.0 credit from:1.0
ENST 2000 [0.5]
Nature, Environment and Society: Theoretical Perspectives
ENST 2001 [0.5]
Sustainable Futures: Environmental Challenges and Solutions
ENST 2500 [0.5]
Climate Change: Social Science Perspectives
3.  1.0 credit from:1.0
ENST 3000 [0.5]
Environmental Studies Colloquium
ENST 3022 [0.5]
Environmental and Natural Resources
GEOG 3501 [0.5]
Geographies of the Canadian North
4.  1.0 credit from:1.0
ENST 4006 [0.5]
Environmental Policy Analysis
GEOG 3206 [0.5]
Health, Environment, and Society
GEOG 3209 [0.5]
Sustainability and Environment in the South
GEOG 4004 [0.5]
Environmental Impact Assessment
GEOG 4022 [0.5]
Seminar in People, Resources and Environmental Change
GEOG 4050 [0.5]
Environmental and Geographic Education
Total Credits4.0
APPROVED ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES ELECTIVES
Please note that the Approved Electives below may have prerequisite requirements or could be cross-listed.
Architecture
ARCU 3902 [0.5]
Urban Studies (Section A)
ARCC 3004 [0.5]
Workshop: Energy and Form
ARCC 4103 [0.5]
Energy and Form
ARCH 4105 [0.5]
Theories of Landscape Design
Biology
BIOL 1010 [0.5]
Biotechnology and Society
BIOL 1902 [0.5]
Natural History
BIOL 2600 [0.5]
Introduction to Ecology
BIOL 2903 [0.5]
Natural History and Ecology of Ontario
BIOL 3601 [0.5]
Ecosystems and Environmental Change
BIOL 3602 [0.5]
Conservation Biology
Business
BUSI 3119 [0.5]
Sustainability and the Role of Business
Earth Sciences
ERTH 2402 [0.5]
Climate Change: An Earth Sciences Perspective
ERTH 2415 [0.5]
Natural Disasters
ERTH 2403 [0.5]
Introduction to Oceanography
ERTH 4303 [0.5]
Resources of the Earth
Economics
ECON 3803 [0.5]
The Economics of Natural Resources
ECON 3804 [0.5]
Environmental Economics
Environmental Science
ENSC 2001 [0.5]
Earth Resources and Natural Hazards: Environmental Impacts
Environmental Studies
ENST 1020 [0.5]
People, Places and Environments
ENST 2001 [0.5]
Sustainable Futures: Environmental Challenges and Solutions
ENST 2005 [0.5]
Introduction to Qualitative Research
ENST 2006 [0.5]
Introduction to Quantitative Research
ENST 2500 [0.5]
Climate Change: Social Science Perspectives
ENST 3900 [0.5]
Honours Field Course
ENST 4001 [0.5]
Environmental Studies Practicum I
ENST 4002 [0.5]
Environmental Studies Practicum II
ENST 4005 [0.5]
Directed Studies in Environmental Studies
ENST 4006 [0.5]
Environmental Policy Analysis
ENST 4400 [0.5]
Field Studies
European and Eurasian Studies
First Year Seminars
FYSM 1610 [1.0]
Understanding Environmental Discourse
Geomatics
GEOM 1004 [0.5]
Maps, Satellites and the Geospatial Revolution
GEOM 2007 [0.5]
Geographic Information Systems
GEOM 3002 [0.5]
Air Photo Interpretation and Remote Sensing
GEOM 3005 [0.5]
Geospatial Analysis
GEOM 4003 [0.5]
Remote Sensing of the Environment
GEOM 4009 [0.5]
Applications in Geographic Information Systems
Geography
GEOG 1010 [0.5]
Global Environmental Systems
GEOG 1020 [0.5]
People, Places and Environments
GEOG 2013 [0.5]
Weather and Water
GEOG 2014 [0.5]
The Earth's Surface
GEOG 2020 [0.5]
Physical Environments of Canada
GEOG 2200 [0.5]
Global Connections
GEOG 2300 [0.5]
Space, Place and Culture
GEOG 2400 [0.5]
Cities and Urbanization
GEOG 2500 [0.5]
Climate Change: Social Science Perspectives
GEOG 2600 [0.5]
Geography Behind the Headlines
GEOG 3001 [0.5]
Doing Qualitative Research
GEOG 3003 [0.5]
Quantitative Geography
GEOG 3010 [0.5]
Field Methods in Physical Geography
GEOG 3021 [0.5]
Geographies of Culture and Identity
GEOG 3022 [0.5]
Environmental and Natural Resources
GEOG 3023 [0.5]
Cities in a Global World
GEOG 3024 [0.5]
Understanding Globalization
GEOG 3030 [0.5]
Regional Field Excursion
GEOG 3103 [0.5]
Watershed Hydrology
GEOG 3104 [0.5]
Principles of Biogeography
GEOG 3105 [0.5]
Climate and Atmospheric Change
GEOG 3108 [0.5]
Soil Properties
GEOG 3206 [0.5]
Health, Environment, and Society
GEOG 3209 [0.5]
Sustainability and Environment in the South
GEOG 3404 [0.5]
Geographies of Economic Development
GEOG 3501 [0.5]
Geographies of the Canadian North
GEOG 3700 [0.5]
Population Geography
GEOG 4004 [0.5]
Environmental Impact Assessment
GEOG 4022 [0.5]
Seminar in People, Resources and Environmental Change
GEOG 4023 [0.5]
Seminar in Special Topics on the City
GEOG 4050 [0.5]
Environmental and Geographic Education
GEOG 4303 [0.5]
Urban Planning
History
HIST 2311 [0.5]
Environmental History of Canada
HIST 3209 [0.5]
Canadian Urban History
HIST 3310 [0.5]
Animals in History
Human Rights
HUMR 3503 [0.5]
Global Environmental Justice
Interdisciplinary Science
ISCI 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to the Environment
Law
LAWS 3005 [0.5]
Law and Regulation
LAWS 3800 [0.5]
Law of Environmental Quality
LAWS 4800 [0.5]
Environment and Social Justice
Philosophy
PHIL 3350 [0.5]
Philosophy, Ethics, and Public Affairs
PHIL 3380 [0.5]
Environments, Technology and Values
Political Science
PSCI 2003 [0.5]
Canadian Political Institutions
PSCI 2602 [0.5]
International Relations: Global Political Economy
PSCI 3801 [0.5]
Environmental Politics
PSCI 4808 [0.5]
Global Environmental Politics
Religion
RELI 3710 [0.5]
Religions and the Environment
Sociology and Anthropology
SOCI 2035 [0.5]
Technology, Culture and Society
SOCI 2040 [0.5]
Food, Culture and Society
ANTH 2850 [0.5]
Development and Underdevelopment
SOCI 3038 [0.5]
Studies in Urban Sociology
ANTH 3355 [0.5]
Anthropology and the Environment
SOCI 3805 [0.5]
Studies in Population
ANTH 4036 [0.5]
Science and Technology Studies: Selected Topics
or SOCI 4036 [0.5]
Science and Technology Studies: Selected Topics
Technology, Society, Environment
TSES 2006 [0.5]
Ecology and Culture
TSES 3001 [0.5]
Technology-Society Interactions
TSES 3002 [0.5]
Energy and Sustainability
TSES 4001 [0.5]
Technology and Society: Risk
TSES 4002 [0.5]
Technology and Society: Forecasting
TSES 4003 [0.5]
Technology and Society: Innovation
TSES 4007 [0.5]
Product Life Cycle Analysis
TSES 4008 [0.5]
Environmentally Harmonious Lifestyles

Environmental Studies (ENST) Courses

ENST 1001 [1.0 credit]
Introduction to Environmental Studies

Sustainability requires broadened perspectives on the Earth's natural systems. Geographic and geomatics perspectives help us examine physical and biological environments as the basis of human societies. Includes: landscape interpretation, resources, hazards, inferring meaning from data, and predicting potential impacts of/on human actions.
Precludes additional credit for FYSM 1100.
Lecture two hours and workshops/tutorials two hours weekly.

ENST 1020 [0.5 credit]
People, Places and Environments

Introduction to human geography. Examination of relationships between people, communities, society and the natural environment at local to global scales. Population change, cultural patterns, and historical, economic, political and environmental forces that shape human activity and experiences from place to place.
Also listed as GEOG 1020.
Lectures two hours a week and tutorial one hour a week.

ENST 2000 [0.5 credit]
Nature, Environment and Society: Theoretical Perspectives

Examination of the shifting understandings of nature, the environment, and nature-society relations. Topics include nature as a concept, people’s relationships to the environment across the globe, environmental movements and institutions, narratives of environmental change, and political ecology approaches to understanding and combating environmental degradation.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing in the Environmental Studies program or permission of the Department.
Lecture two hours a week, discussion one hour a week.

ENST 2001 [0.5 credit]
Sustainable Futures: Environmental Challenges and Solutions

Individual and collective responses to pressing environmental problems. Innovative ways in which the environment can be protected and restored, taking into consideration socioeconomic, political and cultural factors. Topics include environmental lifestyles, sustainable communities, food systems, environmental design, and political activism.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing in the Environmental Studies program or permission of the Department.
Lectures, seminars and field work three hours a week.

ENST 2005 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Qualitative Research

Introduction to the research process, from generating questions through to reporting results. Topics include intensive and extensive research approaches; the use of surveys, interviews and other data collection methods; the analysis of qualitative information; and the ethical dimensions of doing research with people and communities.
Also listed as GEOG 2005.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit in GEOG or ENST at the 1000-level and second-year standing, or permission of the Department.
Lectures two hours a week, workshop two hours a week.

ENST 2006 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Quantitative Research

Introduction to solving problems using descriptive and inferential statistical methods. Graphical and numerical tools to describe distributions. Probability, sampling and estimates, and hypothesis testing. Fundamentals of spatial statistics and analysis.
Also listed as GEOG 2006.
Precludes additional credit for BIT 2000, BIT 2100 (no longer offered), BIT 2300 (no longer offered), NEUR 2002, PSCI 2702, STAT 2507, STAT 2606.
Lectures two hours a week, laboratory two hours a week.

ENST 2500 [0.5 credit]
Climate Change: Social Science Perspectives

An introduction to climate change, with an emphasis on human dimensions. Topics include anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, regional variations in climate change and their consequences, human vulnerability and adaptation to environmental change, and climate change politics and policies at a variety of geographic scales.
Also listed as GEOG 2500.
Prerequisite(s): ENST 1020 or GEOG 1020, or second-year standing.
Lectures three hours a week.

ENST 3000 [0.5 credit]
Environmental Studies Colloquium

Interactions among complex natural systems, social values and attitudes and economic, political and legal concerns are explored through invited speakers from various disciplines and agencies addressing specific environmental issues.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in Environmental Studies or permission of Environmental Studies.
Lecture and discussion three hours a week.

ENST 3022 [0.5 credit]
Environmental and Natural Resources

Exploration of complexity, dynamics, uncertainty and equity issues underpinning environmental and resource issues; review and appraisal of selected contemporary methods to assess and manage environmental and natural resources.
Also listed as GEOG 3022.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in Geography or Environmental Studies or permission of the Department.
Lecture three hours a week.

ENST 3900 [0.5 credit]
Honours Field Course

Field research, with a focus on data collection methods, analysis and presentation of findings. Design and conduct research that links the human and biophysical environment. Topics may change from year to year.
Also listed as GEOG 3000.
Precludes additional credit for ENST 2900 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): GEOG 2005/ ENST 2005 and GEOG 2006/ ENST 2006, third-year Honours standing in Environmental Studies, Geomatics, or Geography, or permission of the Department.
Normally consists of a multi-day field excursion in the Ottawa region. A supplementary charge may apply. Consult the department regarding course details.

ENST 3999 [0.0 credit]
Co-operative Work Term

Work Term

ENST 4000 [0.5 credit]
Environmental Studies Seminar

How societal institutions respond to environmental concerns, how various stakeholders understand the environment and how environmental priorities may be implemented in social, political and economic decision-making. Interdisciplinary case studies are used.
Prerequisite(s): registration is restricted to students eligible for fourth-year standing in the B.A. (Environmental Studies) Honours program.
Seminar three hours per week.

ENST 4001 [0.5 credit]
Environmental Studies Practicum I

External agency setting provides the basis for translating academic training into practical involvement with environmental issues. Observation and involvement in issues and research methods used by professional environmental practitioners.
Prerequisite(s): registration is restricted to students eligible for fourth-year standing in the B.A. (Environmental Studies) Honours program, and permission of the Environmental Studies Co-ordinator.

ENST 4002 [0.5 credit]
Environmental Studies Practicum II

External agency setting provides the basis for translating academic training into practical involvement with environmental issues. Observation and involvement in issues and research methods used by environmental practitioners.
Prerequisite(s): restricted to students in the fourth year of the Environmental Studies Honours program, and permission of the Environmental Studies Co-ordinator.

ENST 4005 [0.5 credit]
Directed Studies in Environmental Studies

Students pursue their interest in a selected theme in environmental studies on a tutorial basis with a faculty member.
Prerequisite(s): permission of the Department.
Hours to be arranged.

ENST 4006 [0.5 credit]
Environmental Policy Analysis

Critical examination of the creation, implementation and effectiveness of government policies related to environmental issues. Emphasis on perspectives, actors, institutions and social and economic relationships affecting policy responses to these issues, and on tools for analyzing the implications of specific policy choices.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing in Environmental Studies, Geography, or permission of the Department.
Seminar three hours per week.

ENST 4400 [0.5 credit]
Field Studies

Field observation and methodology in a selected region, special topic or contemporary problem; on an individual or group basis.
Also listed as GEOG 4000.
Prerequisite(s): third-year Honours standing and permission of the Department.
Hours to be arranged.

ENST 4906 [1.0 credit]
Honours Research Project

An independent investigation into a select aspect of environmental studies, supervised by a faculty member. Possible outcomes might include: workshops, audio-visual productions, lay publications, and field projects accompanied by an essay demonstrating the student's capacity to critically reflect on the research project.
Precludes additional credit for GEOG 4904/GEOM 4904 (no longer offered), GEOG 4909,GEOM 4909, GEOG 4906, GEOM 4906, and ENST 4907.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing in Environmental Studies, a minimum CGPA of 9.00 in the major or permission of the Department, and an approved research topic and adviser.
Hours to be arranged with faculty adviser.

ENST 4907 [1.0 credit]
Honours Research Essay

Interdisciplinary research essay on an environmental issue, carried out in consultation with a faculty supervisor. The student must consult with the undergraduate student advisor in selecting a project and a supervisor.
Precludes additional credit for ENST 4906, GEOG 4909, GEOM 4909, GEOG 4904/GEOM 4904 (no longer offered), GEOG 4906 and GEOM 4906.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing in Environmental Studies, a minimum CGPA of 9.00 in the major or permission of the Department, and an approved research topic and adviser.
Hours to be arranged with faculty adviser.

Summer session: some of the courses listed in this Calendar are offered during the summer. Hours and scheduling for summer session courses will differ significantly from those reported in the fall/winter Calendar. To determine the scheduling and hours for summer session classes, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Not all courses listed are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for the current session and to determine the term of offering, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Students should consult with the Department when planning their program and selecting courses. Some of the Environmental Studies Approved Electives have prerequisites, which are not explicitly included in the program. Students should plan to obtain all necessary prerequisites or waivers for courses selected for this program.

B.A. Regulations

The regulations presented below apply to all Bachelor of Arts programs. In addition to the requirements presented here, students must satisfy the University regulations common to all undergraduate students including the process of Academic Performance Evaluation (consult the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar).

First-Year Seminars

B.A. degree students are strongly encouraged to include a First-Year Seminar (FYSM) during their first 4.0 credits of registration. Students are limited to 1.0 credit in FYSM and can only register in a FYSM while they have first-year standing in their B.A. program. Students who have completed the Enriched Support Program (ESP) or who are required to take a minimum of one English as a Second Language (ESLA) credit are not permitted to register in a FYSM.

Breadth Requirement

Among the credits presented at graduation, students in both the B.A. General and the B.A. Honours degrees and B.Co.M.S. are required to include 3.0 breadth credits, including 1.0 credit from each of three of the four Breadth Areas identified below. Credits that fulfil requirements in the Major, Minor, Concentration or Specialization may be used to fulfil the Breadth Requirement.

Students admitted with a completed university degree are exempt from breadth requirements.

Students in the following interdisciplinary programs are exempt from the B.A. breadth requirement.

  • African Studies
  • Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • Environmental Studies
  • Human Rights
Breadth Area 1: Culture and Communication

American Sign Language, Art History, Art and Culture, Communication and Media Studies, Comparative Literary Studies, Digital Humanities, English, Film Studies, French, Journalism, Music, and Languages (Arabic, English as a Second Language, German, Greek, Hebrew, Indigenous Languages, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish)

Subject codes: ARAB, ARTH, ASLA, CHIN, CLST, COMS, DIGH, ENGL, ESLA, FILM, FINS, FREN, GERM, GREK, HEBR, ITAL, JAPA, JOUR, LANG, LATN, MUSI, PORT, RUSS, SPAN

Breadth Area 2: Humanities

African Studies, Applied Linguistics and Discourse Studies, Canadian Studies, Child Studies, Classical Civilization, Directed Interdisciplinary Studies, Disability Studies, European and Russian Studies, History, Human Rights, Humanities, Indigenous Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Linguistics, Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Philosophy, Religion, Sexuality Studies, South Asian Studies, and Women's and Gender Studies.

Subject codes: AFRI, ALDS, CDNS, CHST, CLCV, DBST, DIST, EURR, HIST, HUMR, HUMS, INDG, LACS, LING, MEMS, PHIL, RELI, SAST, SXST, WGST

Breadth Area 3: Science, Engineering, and Design

Architecture, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Engineering, Environmental Science, Food Science and Nutrition, Health Sciences, Industrial Design, Mathematics, Neuroscience, Statistics, Physics, and Technology, Society, Environment.

Subject codes: AERO, ARCC, ARCH, ARCN, ARCS, ARCU, BIOC, BIOL, CHEM, CIVE, CMPS, COMP, ECOR, ELEC, ENSC, ENVE, ERTH, FOOD, HLTH, IDES, ISCI, ISCS, ISYS, MAAE, MATH, MECH, NEUR, NSCI, PHYS, SREE, STAT, SYSC, TSES

Breadth Area 4: Social Sciences

Anthropology, Business, Cognitive Science, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Economics, Environmental Studies, Geography, Geomatics, Global and International Studies, Global Politics, Interdisciplinary Public Affairs, International Affairs, Law, Migration and Diaspora Studies, Political Management, Political Science, Psychology, Public Administration, Public Affairs and Policy Management, Social Work, Sociology/Anthropology, Sociology

Subject codes: ANTH, BUSI, CGSC, CRCJ, ECON, ENST, GEOG, GEOM, GINS, GPOL, INAF, IPAF, LAWS, MGDS, PADM, PAPM, POLM, PSCI, PSYC, SOCI, SOWK

Declared and Undeclared Students

Students who are registered in a program within the degree are called Declared students. Most students designate a program of study when they first apply for admission and so begin their studies as Declared students. Students may also choose to begin their studies within the B.A. degree without being registered in a program. These students are referred to as Undeclared. The recommended course pattern for Undeclared students is outlined under Undeclared in the Programs section of this Calendar. Undeclared students must apply to enter a program before beginning their second year of study. The Student Academic Success Centre offers support to Undeclared students in making this decision.

Change of Program Within the B.A. Degree

Students may transfer to a program within the B.A. degree, if upon entry to the new program they would be in Good Standing . Other applications for change of program will be considered on their merits; students may be admitted to the new program in Good Standing or on Academic Warning. Students may apply to declare or change their program within the B.A. Degree at the Registrar's Office according to the published deadlines. Acceptance into a program or into a program element or option is subject to any enrollment limitations, specific program, program element or option requirements, as published in the relevant Calendar entry.

Minors, Concentrations and Specializations

Students may apply to the Registrar's Office to be admitted to a minor, concentration or specialization during their first or subsequent years of study. Acceptance into a minor, concentration or specialization is subject to any specific requirements of the intended Minor, Concentration or Specialization as published in the relevant Calendar entry. Acceptance into a Concentration or Specialization requires that the student be in Good Standing.

Mention : Français

Students registered in certain B.A. programs may earn the notation Mention : Français by completing part of their requirements in French and by demonstrating a knowledge of the history and culture of French Canada. The general requirements are listed below. For more specific details consult the departmental program entries.

Students in a B.A. Honours program must present:

  1. 1.0 credit in French language;
  2. 1.0 credit devoted to the history and culture of French Canada;
  3. 1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level and 1.0 credit at the 4000-level in the Honours discipline taken in French.

Students in a B.A. General program must present:

  1. 1.0 credit in advanced French;
  2. 1.0 credit devoted to the history and culture of French Canada;
  3. 1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level in the Major discipline taken in French.

Students in Combined Honours programs must fulfil the Mention : Français requirement in both disciplines.

Courses taught in French (Item 3, above) may be taken at Carleton, at the University of Ottawa on the Exchange Agreement, or at a francophone university on a Letter of Permission. Students planning to take courses on exchange or on a Letter of Permission should take careful note of the residence requirement for a minimum number of Carleton courses in their programs. Consult the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar for information regarding study on Exchange or Letter of Permission.

Co-operative Education

For more information about how to apply for the Co-op program and how the Co-op program works please visit the Co-op website.

All students participating in the Co-op program are governed by the Undergraduate Co-operative Education Policy.

Undergraduate Co-operative Education Policy

Admission Requirements

Students can apply to co-op in one of two ways; directly from high school or after beginning a degree program at Carleton.

If a student is admitted to co-op from high school, their grades will be reviewed two terms to one year prior to their first work term to ensure they continue to meet the academic requirements after their 1st or 2nd year of study. The time at which evaluation takes place depends on the program of study. Students will automatically be notified via their Carleton email account if they are permitted to continue.

Students not admitted to Carleton University with the co-op option on their degree can apply for admission via the co-operative education program website. To view application deadlines, visit carleton.ca/co-op.

Admission to the co-op option is based on the completion of 5.0 or more credits at Carleton University, the CGPA requirement for the students' academic program as well as any course prerequisites. The articulated CGPA for each program is the normal standard for assessment. Please see the specific degree program sections for the unique admission and continuation requirements for each academic program.

English Language Proficiency

Students admitted to Carleton based on CAEL, IELTS or TOEFL assessments and who are required to take an ESL course must take and pass the Oral Proficiency in Communicative Settings (OPECS) Test. The test must be taken before being permitted to register in COOP 1000. Admission to the co-op program can be confirmed with a minimum score of 4+.

Participation Requirements

COOP 1000

Once a student has been given admission or continuation confirmation to the co-op option s/he must complete and pass COOP 1000 (a mandatory online 0.0 credit course). Students will have access to this course a minimum of two terms prior to their first work term and will be notified when to register.

Communication with the Co-op Office

Students must maintain contact with the co-op office during their job search and while on a work term. All email communication will be conducted via the students' Carleton email account.

Employment

Although every effort is made to ensure a sufficient number of job postings for all students enrolled in the co-op option of their degree program, no guarantee of employment can be made. Carleton's co-op program operates a competitive job search process and is dependent upon current market conditions. Academic performance, skills, motivation, maturity, attitude and potential will determine whether a student is offered a job. It is the student's responsibility to actively conduct a  job search in addition to participation in the job search process operated by the co-op office. Once a student accepts a co-op job offer (verbally or written), his/her job search will end and access to co-op jobs will be removed for that term. Students that do not successfully obtain a co-op work term are expected to continue with their academic studies. The summer term is the exception to this rule. Students should also note that hiring priority is given to Canadian citizens for co-op positions in the Federal Government of Canada.

Registering in Co-op Courses

Students will be registered in a Co-op Work Term course while at work. The number of Co-op Work Term courses that a student is registered in is dependent upon the number of four-month work terms that a student accepts.

While on a co-op work term students may take a maximum of 0.5 credit throughout each four-month co-op work term. Courses must be scheduled outside of regular working hours.

Students must be registered as full-time before they begin their co-op job search (2.0 credits). All co-op work terms must be completed before the beginning of the final academic term. Students may not finish their degree on a co-op work term.

Work Term Assessment and Evaluation

To obtain a Satisfactory grade for the co-op work term students must have:

  1. A satisfactory work term evaluation by the co-op employer;
  2. A satisfactory grade on the work term report.

Students must submit a work term report at the completion of each four-month work term. Reports are due on the 16th of April, August, and December and students are notified of due dates through their Carleton email account.

Workplace performance will be assessed by the workplace supervisor. Should a student receive an unsatisfactory rating from their co-op employer, an investigation by the co-op program manager will be undertaken. An unsatisfactory employer evaluation does not preclude a student from achieving an overall satisfactory rating for the work term.

Graduation with the Co-op Designation

In order to graduate with the co-op designation, students must satisfy all requirements for their degree program in addition to the requirements according to each co-op program (i.e. successful completion of three or four work terms).

Note: Participation in the co-op option will add up to one additional year for a student to complete their degree program.

Voluntary Withdrawal from the Co-op Option

Students may withdraw from the co-op option of their degree program during a study term ONLY. Students at work may not withdraw from the work term or the co-op option until s/he has completed the requirements of the work term.

Students are eligible to continue in their regular academic program provided that they meet the academic standards required for continuation.

Involuntary or Required Withdrawal from the Co-op Option

Students may be required to withdraw from the co-op option of their degree program for one or any of the following reasons:

  1. Failure to achieve a grade of SAT in COOP 1000
  2. Failure to pay all co-op related fees
  3. Failure to actively participate in the job search process
  4. Failure to attend all interviews for positions to which the student has applied
  5. Declining more than one job offer during the job search process
  6. Continuing a job search after accepting a co-op position
  7. Dismissal from a work term by the co-op employer
  8. Leaving a work term without approval by the Co-op manager
  9. Receipt of an unsatisfactory work term evaluation
  10. Submission of an unsatisfactory work term report

Standing and Appeals

The Co-op and Career Services office administers the regulations and procedures that are applicable to all co-op program options. All instances of a student's failure during a work term or other issues directly related to their participation in the co-op option will be reported to the academic department.

Any decision made by the Co-op and Career Services office can be appealed via the normal appeal process within the University.

International Students

All International Students are required to possess a Co-op Work Permit issued by Citizenship and Immigration Canada before they can begin working. It is illegal to work in Canada without the proper authorization. Students will be provided with a letter of support to accompany their application. Students must submit their application for their permit before being permitted to view and apply for jobs on the Co-op Services database. Confirmation of a position will not be approved until a student can confirm they have received their permit. Students are advised to discuss the application process and requirements with the International Student Services Office.

B.A. Honours Environmental Studies: Co-op Admission and Continuation Requirements

  • Maintain full-time status in each study term (2.0 credits);
  • Be eligible to work in Canada (for off-campus work)
  • Have successfully completed COOP 1000 [0.0]

In addition to the following:

  1. Registered in the B.A. Honours Environmental Studies program;
  2. Obtained and maintained an overall minimum CGPA of 9.5 and a minimum major CGPA of 9.5;
  3. Have obtained third-year standing;
  4. Successfully completed, by the start date of the first work term:
    1. the required second-year methods courses in their program (ENST 2005, ENST 2006)
    2. the required field course in their program (ENST 3900, GEOG 3000, GEOG 3010, GEOG 3030)
  5. Be registered as a full-time student.

B.A. Honours Environmental Studies students must successfully complete three (3) work terms to obtain the Co-op designation.

Co-op work term course: ENST 3999
Work/Study Pattern:

Year 1Year 2Year 3Year 4Year 5
TermPatternTermPatternTermPatternTermPatternTermPattern
FallSFallSFallSFallS/WFallO
WinterSWinterSWinterSWinterS/WWinterS
Summer Summer SummerWSummerS/W

Legend
S
: Study
W: Work
O: Optional
* indicates recommended work study pattern
** student finds own employer for this work-term.

Admissions Information

Admission Requirements are for the 2017-2018 year only, and are based on the Ontario High School System. Holding the minimum admission requirements only establishes eligibility for consideration. The cut-off averages for admission may be considerably higher than the minimum. See also the General Admission and Procedures section of this Calendar. An overall average of at least 70% is normally required to be considered for admission. Some programs may also require specific course prerequisites and prerequisite averages and/or supplementary admission portfolios. Higher averages are required for admission to programs for which the demand for places by qualified applicants exceeds the number of places available. The overall average required for admission is determined each year on a program by program basis. Consult admissions.carleton.ca for further details.

Admission Requirements

Degrees

  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)(Honours)
  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)(General)

First Year

For B.A. (General) and B.A. (Honours)
The Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent including a minimum of six 4U or M courses. The six 4U or M courses must include a 4U course in English (or anglais ). For applicants whose first language is not English, the requirement of English can also be met under the conditions outlined in the section “English Language Requirements” in the Admissions Requirements and Procedures section of this Calendar.

The cut-off average for admission will be set annually and will normally be above the minimum requirement. Applicants falling slightly below the cut-off average will be considered on an individual basis to determine whether there are special circumstances that would permit their admission. Students who feel that their high school grade average does not reflect their potential may apply to the Enriched Support Program (see the Enriched Support Program section of this Calendar).

Advanced Standing

B.A. (General and Honours) Program

Applications for admission to the second or subsequent years will be assessed on their merits. Advanced standing will be granted only for those courses that are determined to be appropriate.