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Arthur Kroeger College of Public Affairs
(Faculty of Public Affairs)
D199 Loeb Bldg.
613-520-7560
http://carleton.ca/akcollege

This section presents the requirements for programs in:

Graduate Pathways

Accelerated pathways or advanced standing with transfer of credits to graduate programs at Carleton University may be available to eligible BPAPM students. Please consult the Graduate Calendar for the pathway requirements for the MA degree in International Affairs offered by the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs and the MPPA degree offered by the School of Public Policy and Administration.

Program Requirements

Language Requirement for B.P.A.P.M.

Prior to graduation, students must satisfy a language proficiency requirement in one of the following ways:

  1. successful completion of an approved French language credit (FREN 1100);
  2. placement at a demonstrated competency level equivalent to satisfactory completion of FREN 1100 following a self-assessment questionnaire and interview administered by the Department of French (for students who already possess demonstrated capacity in French);
  3. successful completion of French Immersion in high school or possession of a Bilingual Diploma or Certificate.

Students should note that they will be required to use one of their elective credits if they choose to satisfy the language requirement through an approved French language credit.

For students whose first language is not English, or for students whose Specialization interests require a language other than French, the Language Requirement may be met by substituting another language for French. Permission for substitution may be sought from the Program Coordinator. Students registering in the Specialization in International Studies should note the additional language requirement.

Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management (B.P.A.P.M.)

Before the second year of study, students in this program must register in one of the specializations listed below.

Specialization in Communication and Policy Studies (Communication Technologies and Regulation)
B.P.A.P.M. (20.0 credits)

Specialization in Communication and Policy Studies (Strategic Public Opinion)
B.P.A.P.M. (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major (10.5 credits)
1.  4.0 credits in:4.0
PAPM 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Public Affairs and Policy Management
PAPM 2000 [1.0]
Policy: Analysis, Implementation and Evaluation
PAPM 3000 [0.5]
Policy Research
PAPM 4000 [0.5]
Capstone Seminar in Public Affairs and Policy Management
PAPM 4908 [1.0]
Honours Research Essay
2.  0.5 credit from:0.5
COMS 2200 [0.5]
Big Data and Society
COMS 2300 [0.5]
Communication as Propaganda
COMS 2504 [0.5]
Language and Communication
3.  0.5 credit from:0.5
BUSI 2400 [0.5]
Foundations of Information Systems
BUSI 2204 [0.5]
Basic Marketing
JOUR 2501 [0.5]
Media Law
SOCI 2035 [0.5]
Technology, Culture and Society
4.  1.5 credits from:1.5
ANTH 3010 [0.5]
Language, Culture, and Globalization
ANTH 3037 [0.5]
Studies in Information Systems and Social Power
BUSI 3205 [0.5]
Marketing Communications
BUSI 3207 [0.5]
Marketing Research
COMS 3108 [0.5]
Media Industries and the Network Society
COMS 3302 [0.5]
Political Communication
COMS 3308 [0.5]
Critical Studies of Consumer Culture
COMS 3310 [0.5]
Critical Perspectives of Public Relations
COMS 3311 [0.5]
Media and Communication in Regional Contexts
COMS 3401 [0.5]
Communications Regulation in Canada
COMS 3403 [0.5]
Communication, Technology and Culture
COMS 3411 [0.5]
Alternative Media and Social Activism
LAWS 3005 [0.5]
Law and Regulation
LAWS 3006 [0.5]
Mediation
LAWS 3201 [0.5]
Business Enterprise Frameworks
LAWS 3202 [0.5]
Intellectual Property
LAWS 3501 [0.5]
Law in the Information Society
LAWS 3503 [0.5]
Equality and Discrimination
Introduction to Political Management
PSCI 3108 [0.5]
Politics of Popular Culture
PSCI 3402 [0.5]
Canadian Public Policy
PSCI 3405 [0.5]
Comparative Public Policy Analysis
PSCI 3406 [0.5]
Public Affairs and Media Strategies
PSCI 3407 [0.5]
Public Opinion and Public Policy
SOCI 3710 [0.5]
Introduction to Cultural Studies
5.  1.0 credit from:1.0
ANTH 4500 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in Culture and Symbols
COMS 4307 [0.5]
Politics, Communication, and the Publicity State
COMS 4401 [0.5]
Global Internet Policy and Governance
COMS 4406 [0.5]
Open Government and Communication
LAWS 4402 [0.5]
Employment Dispute Resolution
LAWS 4801 [0.5]
Risk and the Legal Process
PSCI 4003 [0.5]
Politics and the Media
PSCI 4702 [0.5]
Intermediate Research Methods for Applied Political Science
6.  1.5 credits in:1.5
For the policy stream in Communication Technologies and Regulation:
COMS 3401 [0.5]
Communications Regulation in Canada
COMS 3403 [0.5]
Communication, Technology and Culture
LAWS 3005 [0.5]
Law and Regulation
LAWS 3202 [0.5]
Intellectual Property
LAWS 3501 [0.5]
Law in the Information Society
For the policy stream in Strategic Public Opinion:
1.0 credit in:
COMS 3001 [0.5]
Quantitative Research in Communication
COMS 3002 [0.5]
Qualitative Research in Communication
0.5 credit from:
COMS 3302 [0.5]
Political Communication
Introduction to Political Management
PSCI 3407 [0.5]
Public Opinion and Public Policy
7.  1.5 credits in: 1.5
For the policy stream in Communication Technologies and Regulation:
BUSI 4400 [0.5]
IS Strategy, Management and Acquisition
BUSI 4404 [0.5]
IT Infrastructure
COMS 4006 [0.5]
Professional Communication Research
COMS 4317 [0.5]
Digital Media and Global Network Society
COMS 4405 [0.5]
The Networked Self
COMS 4407 [0.5]
Communication and Critical Data Studies
COMS 4410 [0.5]
Mobile Media
COMS 4411 [0.5]
Algorithmic Culture
COMS 4412 [0.5]
Game Studies
ECON 3300 [0.5]
Public Policy Toward Business
ECON 3850 [0.5]
Economics of Information and the Media
LAWS 4507 [0.5]
Administrative Law and Control
LAWS 4510 [0.5]
Topics in Law, Policy and Government
For the policy stream in Strategic Public Opinion:
COMS 4006 [0.5]
Professional Communication Research
COMS 4312 [0.5]
Crisis and Risk Communication
COMS 4317 [0.5]
Digital Media and Global Network Society
COMS 4403 [0.5]
Digital Media Industries
COMS 4405 [0.5]
The Networked Self
ECON 3300 [0.5]
Public Policy Toward Business
JOUR 4001 [0.5]
Journalism Now - and Next
PSCI 4003 [0.5]
Politics and the Media
PSCI 4204 [0.5]
Elections
PSCI 4209 [0.5]
Westminster Democracies: Parliaments, Parties and Elections
PSCI 4407 [0.5]
Public Policy: Content and Creation
PSCI 4408 [0.5]
Public Affairs Management and Analysis
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (9.5 credits)
8.  1.0 credit in:1.0
PSCI 2701 [0.5]
Introduction to Research Methods in Political Science
PSCI 2702 [0.5]
Quantitative Research Methods in Political Science
9.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen
10.  1.5 credits in:1.5
ECON 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Economics
BUSI 3602 [0.5]
Designing Organizational Systems: An Overview
11.  1.0 credit in:1.0
PSCI 2002 [0.5]
& PSCI 2003 [0.5]
Canadian Political Environment
Canadian Political Institutions
or
PSCI 2101 [0.5]
& PSCI 2102 [0.5]
Comparative Politics of the Global North
Comparative Politics of the Global South
12.  1.0 credit from:1.0
HIST 1002 [1.0]
Europe in the 20th Century
HIST 1300 [1.0]
The Making of Canada
HIST 1707 [1.0]
World History
13.  4.0 credits in free electives4.0
Total Credits20.0

Specialization in Development Policy Studies (Global Economic Relations)
B.P.A.P.M. (20.0 credits)

Specialization in Development Policy Studies (Rights and Human Development)
B.P.A.P.M. (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major (10.5 credits)
1.  4.0 credits in:4.0
PAPM 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Public Affairs and Policy Management
PAPM 2000 [1.0]
Policy: Analysis, Implementation and Evaluation
PAPM 3000 [0.5]
Policy Research
PAPM 4000 [0.5]
Capstone Seminar in Public Affairs and Policy Management
PAPM 4908 [1.0]
Honours Research Essay
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
PSCI 2601 [0.5]
International Relations: Global Politics
or PSCI 2602 [0.5]
International Relations: Global Political Economy
and
SOWK 3206 [0.5]
Community Development and Social Change in an International Context
3.  1.0 credit from:1.0
ECON 3508 [0.5]
Introduction to Economic Development
ECON 3509 [0.5]
Development Planning and Project Evaluation
ECON 3601 [0.5]
Introduction to International Trade
ECON 3602 [0.5]
International Monetary Problems
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
PSCI 3307 [0.5]
Politics of Human Rights
4.  1.0 credit from:1.0
LAWS 4102 [0.5]
Controversies in Rights Theory
LAWS 4200 [0.5]
International Economic Law
LAWS 4605 [0.5]
Topics in International Law
PSCI 4104 [0.5]
Development in the Global South - Theory and Practice
PSCI 4105 [0.5]
Selected Problems in Development in the Global South
PSCI 4603 [0.5]
Analysis of International Political Economy
PSCI 4604 [0.5]
Selected Problems in International Political Economy
PSCI 4805 [0.5]
Political Economy of Global Money and Finance
PSCI 4505 [0.5]
Transitions to Democracy
5.  0.5 credit in:0.5
For the policy stream in Global Economic Relations:
INAF 4401 [0.5]
Topics in Global Economic Relations
For the policy stream in Rights and Human Development:
INAF 4301 [0.5]
Topics in Rights and Human Development
6.  3.0 credits in policy stream electives, at least one of which must be at the 4000 level:3.0
For the policy stream in Global Economic Relations:
ANTH 2850 [0.5]
Development and Underdevelopment
BUSI 3706 [0.5]
International Business Negotiations
ECON 3370 [0.5]
The Economics of Migration
ECON 3601 [0.5]
Introduction to International Trade
ECON 3602 [0.5]
International Monetary Problems
ECON 3804 [0.5]
Environmental Economics
ECON 4508 [0.5]
International Aspects of Economic Development
ECON 4601 [0.5]
International Trade Theory and Policy
ECON 4602 [0.5]
International Monetary Theory and Policy
GEOG 2200 [0.5]
Global Connections
GEOG 3024 [0.5]
Understanding Globalization
GEOG 3209 [0.5]
Sustainability and Environment in the South
GEOG 3404 [0.5]
Geographies of Economic Development
GEOG 4024 [0.5]
Seminar in Globalization
HIST 3217 [0.5]
Empire and Globalization
HIST 3306 [0.5]
Canada's International Policies
INAF 3001 [0.5]
Understanding Policy in a Global Context
INAF 4101 [0.5]
Topics in Conflict and Conflict Management
INAF 4201 [0.5]
Topics in Security and Intelligence
INAF 4301 [0.5]
Topics in Rights and Human Development
LAWS 3207 [0.5]
International Transactions
LAWS 3208 [0.5]
International Trade Regulation
LAWS 4200 [0.5]
International Economic Law
PSCI 3100 [0.5]
Politics of Development in Africa
PSCI 3102 [0.5]
Politics of Development of China
PSCI 3103 [0.5]
State, Society and Economy in Northeast Asia
PSCI 3105 [0.5]
Imperialism
PSCI 3204 [0.5]
Politics of Latin America
PSCI 3205 [0.5]
Mexican Politics
PSCI 3207 [0.5]
The Government and Politics of European Integration
PSCI 3405 [0.5]
Comparative Public Policy Analysis
PSCI 3502 [0.5]
Gender and Politics: Global South
PSCI 3600 [0.5]
International Institutions
PSCI 3601 [0.5]
Theories of International Politics
PSCI 3606 [0.5]
Canadian Foreign Policy
PSCI 3608 [0.5]
Migration Governance
PSCI 3609 [0.5]
Global Politics of Food
PSCI 3703 [0.5]
Governing in the Global Economy
PSCI 3801 [0.5]
Environmental Politics
PSCI 4207 [0.5]
Globalization, Adjustment and Democracy in Africa
PSCI 4603 [0.5]
Analysis of International Political Economy
PSCI 4604 [0.5]
Selected Problems in International Political Economy
PSCI 4610 [0.5]
Politics of Migration Management
PSCI 4800 [0.5]
Advanced International Relations Theory
PSCI 4805 [0.5]
Political Economy of Global Money and Finance
PSCI 4808 [0.5]
Global Environmental Politics
PSCI 4819 [0.5]
Latin America in the World
TSES 4011 [0.5]
Technology and Society: Development
For the policy stream in Rights and Human Development:
ECON 3380 [0.5]
The Economics of Gender and Ethnicity
ECON 3508 [0.5]
Introduction to Economic Development
ECON 3509 [0.5]
Development Planning and Project Evaluation
ECON 3804 [0.5]
Environmental Economics
GEOG 2200 [0.5]
Global Connections
GEOG 3023 [0.5]
Cities in a Global World
GEOG 3026 [0.5]
Topics in the Geography of Canada
GEOG 3209 [0.5]
Sustainability and Environment in the South
HIST 3217 [0.5]
Empire and Globalization
HIST 3306 [0.5]
Canada's International Policies
HUMR 3401 [0.5]
Histories of Persecution and Genocide
HUMR 3501 [0.5]
Social, Economic and Cultural Rights
HUMR 3502 [0.5]
Corporations and Human Rights
HUMR 3504 [0.5]
Public Health and Human Rights
HUMR 4201 [0.5]
Citizenship and Human Rights
HUMR 4401 [0.5]
Gender, Citizenship and Social Justice in a Transnational World
HUMR 4404 [0.5]
Rights of Refugees and Displaced Persons
HUMR 4502 [0.5]
Global Indigenous Knowledges and Movements
INAF 4101 [0.5]
Topics in Conflict and Conflict Management
INAF 4201 [0.5]
Topics in Security and Intelligence
INAF 4401 [0.5]
Topics in Global Economic Relations
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 3503 [0.5]
Equality and Discrimination
LAWS 3504 [0.5]
Law and Aboriginal Peoples
LAWS 3509 [0.5]
The Charter of Rights Topics
LAWS 3604 [0.5]
International Organizations
LAWS 4101 [0.5]
Contemporary Justice Theories
LAWS 4102 [0.5]
Controversies in Rights Theory
LAWS 4105 [0.5]
Global Justice Theory
LAWS 4601 [0.5]
Transnational Law and Human Rights
LAWS 4603 [0.5]
Transitional Justice
LAWS 4605 [0.5]
Topics in International Law
LAWS 4606 [0.5]
International Law of Armed Conflict
LAWS 4607 [0.5]
Immigration and Refugee Law
LAWS 4610 [0.5]
Special Topics in Transnational Law and Human Rights
LAWS 4800 [0.5]
Environment and Social Justice
PHIL 2103 [0.5]
Philosophy of Human Rights
PSCI 3105 [0.5]
Imperialism
PSCI 3107 [0.5]
The Causes of War
PSCI 3307 [0.5]
Politics of Human Rights
PSCI 3600 [0.5]
International Institutions
PSCI 3601 [0.5]
Theories of International Politics
PSCI 3606 [0.5]
Canadian Foreign Policy
PSCI 3801 [0.5]
Environmental Politics
PSCI 3802 [0.5]
Globalization and Human Rights
PSCI 3805 [0.5]
Politics of Race
PSCI 4104 [0.5]
Development in the Global South - Theory and Practice
PSCI 4105 [0.5]
Selected Problems in Development in the Global South
PSCI 4109 [0.5]
The Politics of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
PSCI 4206 [0.5]
Indigenous Politics of North America
PSCI 4207 [0.5]
Globalization, Adjustment and Democracy in Africa
PSCI 4500 [0.5]
Gender and Globalization
PSCI 4505 [0.5]
Transitions to Democracy
PSCI 4605 [0.5]
Gender in International Relations
PSCI 4807 [0.5]
Migration and Mobility: Politics of Citizenship and Identity
PSCI 4808 [0.5]
Global Environmental Politics
PSCI 4817 [0.5]
International Politics of Forced Migration
SOWK 3206 [0.5]
Community Development and Social Change in an International Context
SOWK 3207 [0.5]
Human Rights Practice in Civil Society
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (9.5 credits)
7.  1.0 credit in:1.0
PSCI 2701 [0.5]
Introduction to Research Methods in Political Science
PSCI 2702 [0.5]
Quantitative Research Methods in Political Science
8.  1.5 credits in:1.5
ECON 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Economics
BUSI 3602 [0.5]
Designing Organizational Systems: An Overview
9.  1.0 credit in:1.0
PSCI 2101 [0.5]
& PSCI 2102 [0.5]
Comparative Politics of the Global North
Comparative Politics of the Global South
or
PSCI 2002 [0.5]
& PSCI 2003 [0.5]
Canadian Political Environment
Canadian Political Institutions
10.  1.0 credit from:1.0
HIST 1002 [1.0]
Europe in the 20th Century
HIST 1300 [1.0]
The Making of Canada
HIST 1707 [1.0]
World History
11.  1.0 credit in:1.0
For the policy stream in Global Economic Relations:
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law
LAWS 3604 [0.5]
International Organizations
For the policy stream in Rights and Human Development:
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law
LAWS 3602 [0.5]
International Human Rights
12.  4.0 credits in free electives4.0
Total Credits20.0

Specialization in International Policy Studies (International Relations and Conflict)
B.P.A.P.M. (20.0 credits)

Specialization in International Policy Studies (Concentration in Security and Intelligence)
B.P.A.P.M. (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major (10.5)
1.  4.0 credits in:4.0
PAPM 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Public Affairs and Policy Management
PAPM 2000 [1.0]
Policy: Analysis, Implementation and Evaluation
PAPM 3000 [0.5]
Policy Research
PAPM 4000 [0.5]
Capstone Seminar in Public Affairs and Policy Management
PAPM 4908 [1.0]
Honours Research Essay
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
INAF 3001 [0.5]
Understanding Policy in a Global Context
INAF 3002 [0.5]
Applied Policy in a Global Context
3.  0.5 credit from:0.5
PSCI 2601 [0.5]
International Relations: Global Politics
PSCI 2602 [0.5]
International Relations: Global Political Economy
4.  0.5 credit from:0.5
ECON 3601 [0.5]
Introduction to International Trade
ECON 3602 [0.5]
International Monetary Problems
5.  1.0 credit from:1.0
PSCI 3405 [0.5]
Comparative Public Policy Analysis
PSCI 3603 [0.5]
Strategic Thought and International Security
PSCI 3606 [0.5]
Canadian Foreign Policy
PSCI 3607 [0.5]
North American Security and Defence Policy
6.  1.0 credit from:1.0
For the policy stream in International Relations and Conflict:
LAWS 4105 [0.5]
Global Justice Theory
LAWS 4106 [0.5]
Law and Violence
LAWS 4606 [0.5]
International Law of Armed Conflict
PSCI 4505 [0.5]
Transitions to Democracy
PSCI 4800 [0.5]
Advanced International Relations Theory
PSCI 4801 [0.5]
Selected Problems in Global Politics
For the policy stream in Security and Intelligence:
LAWS 4106 [0.5]
Law and Violence
LAWS 4309 [0.5]
State Security and Dissent
LAWS 4606 [0.5]
International Law of Armed Conflict
PSCI 4008 [0.5]
National Security and Intelligence in the Modern State
PSCI 4801 [0.5]
Selected Problems in Global Politics
7.  0.5 credit in:0.5
For the policy stream in International Relations and Conflict:
INAF 4101 [0.5]
Topics in Conflict and Conflict Management
For the policy stream in Security and Intelligence:
INAF 4201 [0.5]
Topics in Security and Intelligence
8.  2.0 credits in policy stream electives from:2.0
For the policy stream in International Relations and Conflict:
ECON 3804 [0.5]
Environmental Economics
ECON 3808 [0.5]
The Economics of Transition
EURR 4008 [0.5]
Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Eastern and Central Europe
EURR 4102 [0.5]
The Balkans since 1989
EURR 4107 [0.5]
Russia’s Regional and Global Ambitions
EURR 4208 [0.5]
Foreign Policies of Soviet Successor States
GEOG 3024 [0.5]
Understanding Globalization
HIST 3217 [0.5]
Empire and Globalization
HIST 3304 [0.5]
Canada-United States Relations
HIST 3306 [0.5]
Canada's International Policies
HIST 3400 [0.5]
U.S. Foreign Policy since 1941
HIST 3800 [0.5]
International History 1914-41
HIST 3801 [0.5]
International History 1941-90
HIST 3905 [0.5]
Topics in International History
HUMR 3401 [0.5]
Histories of Persecution and Genocide
HUMR 3504 [0.5]
Public Health and Human Rights
INAF 4201 [0.5]
Topics in Security and Intelligence
INAF 4301 [0.5]
Topics in Rights and Human Development
INAF 4401 [0.5]
Topics in Global Economic Relations
LAWS 3208 [0.5]
International Trade Regulation
LAWS 3602 [0.5]
International Human Rights
LAWS 4105 [0.5]
Global Justice Theory
LAWS 4601 [0.5]
Transnational Law and Human Rights
LAWS 4603 [0.5]
Transitional Justice
LAWS 4605 [0.5]
Topics in International Law
LAWS 4606 [0.5]
International Law of Armed Conflict
LAWS 4610 [0.5]
Special Topics in Transnational Law and Human Rights
PSCI 3101 [0.5]
Politics of War in Africa
PSCI 3105 [0.5]
Imperialism
PSCI 3107 [0.5]
The Causes of War
PSCI 3207 [0.5]
The Government and Politics of European Integration
PSCI 3209 [0.5]
Reconstruction and Transformation in Europe and Eurasia
PSCI 3600 [0.5]
International Institutions
PSCI 3601 [0.5]
Theories of International Politics
PSCI 3606 [0.5]
Canadian Foreign Policy
PSCI 3702 [0.5]
Israeli-Palestinian Relations
PSCI 3703 [0.5]
Governing in the Global Economy
PSCI 3801 [0.5]
Environmental Politics
PSCI 3802 [0.5]
Globalization and Human Rights
PSCI 4207 [0.5]
Globalization, Adjustment and Democracy in Africa
PSCI 4500 [0.5]
Gender and Globalization
PSCI 4504 [0.5]
Politics of the Caucasus and Caspian Basin
PSCI 4601 [0.5]
Foreign Policies of Soviet Successor States
PSCI 4603 [0.5]
Analysis of International Political Economy
PSCI 4604 [0.5]
Selected Problems in International Political Economy
PSCI 4605 [0.5]
Gender in International Relations
PSCI 4606 [0.5]
American Foreign Policy
PSCI 4608 [0.5]
European Integration and European Security
PSCI 4800 [0.5]
Advanced International Relations Theory
PSCI 4801 [0.5]
Selected Problems in Global Politics
PSCI 4802 [0.5]
International Politics of Africa
PSCI 4803 [0.5]
Foreign Policies of Major East Asian Powers
PSCI 4805 [0.5]
Political Economy of Global Money and Finance
PSCI 4807 [0.5]
Migration and Mobility: Politics of Citizenship and Identity
PSCI 4808 [0.5]
Global Environmental Politics
PSCI 4817 [0.5]
International Politics of Forced Migration
For the policy stream in Security and Intelligence:
EURR 4008 [0.5]
Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Eastern and Central Europe
EURR 4104 [0.5]
European Integration and European Security
EURR 4107 [0.5]
Russia’s Regional and Global Ambitions
GEOG 3024 [0.5]
Understanding Globalization
HIST 3217 [0.5]
Empire and Globalization
HIST 3304 [0.5]
Canada-United States Relations
HIST 3306 [0.5]
Canada's International Policies
HIST 3400 [0.5]
U.S. Foreign Policy since 1941
HIST 3800 [0.5]
International History 1914-41
HIST 3801 [0.5]
International History 1941-90
HIST 3905 [0.5]
Topics in International History
HUMR 4402 [0.5]
Terror and Human Rights
INAF 4101 [0.5]
Topics in Conflict and Conflict Management
INAF 4301 [0.5]
Topics in Rights and Human Development
INAF 4401 [0.5]
Topics in Global Economic Relations
LAWS 4102 [0.5]
Controversies in Rights Theory
LAWS 4106 [0.5]
Law and Violence
LAWS 4304 [0.5]
Policing and Social Surveillance
LAWS 4309 [0.5]
State Security and Dissent
LAWS 4601 [0.5]
Transnational Law and Human Rights
LAWS 4605 [0.5]
Topics in International Law
LAWS 4610 [0.5]
Special Topics in Transnational Law and Human Rights
PSCI 3107 [0.5]
The Causes of War
PSCI 3405 [0.5]
Comparative Public Policy Analysis
PSCI 3603 [0.5]
Strategic Thought and International Security
PSCI 3607 [0.5]
North American Security and Defence Policy
PSCI 3802 [0.5]
Globalization and Human Rights
PSCI 4008 [0.5]
National Security and Intelligence in the Modern State
PSCI 4601 [0.5]
Foreign Policies of Soviet Successor States
PSCI 4606 [0.5]
American Foreign Policy
PSCI 4608 [0.5]
European Integration and European Security
PSCI 4800 [0.5]
Advanced International Relations Theory
PSCI 4801 [0.5]
Selected Problems in Global Politics
PSCI 4803 [0.5]
Foreign Policies of Major East Asian Powers
PSCI 4806 [0.5]
Transatlantic Security Issues
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (9.5 credits)
9.  1.0 credit in:1.0
PSCI 2701 [0.5]
Introduction to Research Methods in Political Science
PSCI 2702 [0.5]
Quantitative Research Methods in Political Science
10.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law
LAWS 3604 [0.5]
International Organizations
11.  1.5 credits in:1.5
ECON 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Economics
BUSI 3602 [0.5]
Designing Organizational Systems: An Overview
12.  1.0 credit from:1.0
PSCI 2101 [0.5]
& PSCI 2102 [0.5]
Comparative Politics of the Global North
Comparative Politics of the Global South
or
PSCI 2002 [0.5]
& PSCI 2003 [0.5]
Canadian Political Environment
Canadian Political Institutions
13.  1.0 credit from:1.0
HIST 1002 [1.0]
Europe in the 20th Century
HIST 1300 [1.0]
The Making of Canada
HIST 1707 [1.0]
World History
14.  4.0 credits in free electives4.0
C. Additional Requirement
15. In addition to satisfying the French language requirement, students must successfully complete 1.0 credit in a language or possess an equivalent level of proficiency as demonstrated by successfully completing a language test. The language may be either French at a level higher than FREN 1100, or, with the permission of the Director, another language directly relevant to their studies. Students registered in the International Policy Studies specialization will be required to use one of their elective credits if they satisfy this additional language requirement through course work.
Total Credits20.0

Specialization in Public Policy and Administration (Economic Policy)
B.P.A.P.M. (20.0 credits)

Specialization in Public Policy and Administration (Environmental and Sustainable Energy Policy)
B.P.A.P.M. (20.0 credits)

Specialization in Public Policy and Administration with (Social Policy)
B.P.A.P.M. (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major (10.5)
1.  4.0 credits in:4.0
PAPM 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Public Affairs and Policy Management
PAPM 2000 [1.0]
Policy: Analysis, Implementation and Evaluation
PAPM 3000 [0.5]
Policy Research
PAPM 4000 [0.5]
Capstone Seminar in Public Affairs and Policy Management
PAPM 4908 [1.0]
Honours Research Essay
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
ECON 2001 [0.5]
Intermediate Microeconomics for Non-Mathematical Majors
ECON 2101 [0.5]
Intermediate Macroeconomics for Non-Mathematical Majors
3.  1.5 credit in:1.5
ECON 3403 [0.5]
Introduction to Public Economics: Expenditures
ECON 3405 [0.5]
Introduction to Public Economics: Taxation
PADM 3105 [0.5]
Management in the Public Sector
4.  0.5 credit in:0.5
PADM 4230 [0.5]
Ethics for Public Policy
5.  0.5 credit in:0.5
For the policy stream in Economic Policy:
a. 0.5 credit from:
LAWS 3506 [0.5]
Administrative Law
PSCI 3006 [0.5]
Social Power in Canadian Politics
PSCI 3401 [0.5]
Canadian Public Administration
PSCI 3402 [0.5]
Canadian Public Policy
For the policy stream in Environmental and Sustainable Energy Policy:
a. 0.5 credit from:
ECON 3803 [0.5]
The Economics of Natural Resources
ECON 3804 [0.5]
Environmental Economics
LAWS 3800 [0.5]
Law of Environmental Quality
Environmental and Natural Resources
For the policy stream in Social Policy:
a. 0.5 credit in:
SOWK 3100 [0.5]
Social Policy and Administration
6.  3.0 credits in policy stream electives:3.0
For the policy stream in Economic Policy:
3.0 credits from Economic Policy electives list below, including at least 0.5 credit in PADM or ECON, 1.0 credit at the 4000 level and 1.5 credits in Economic Policy electives:
BUSI 3102 [0.5]
Introduction to Human Resources Management
BUSI 3601 [0.5]
Business and its Environment
BUSI 4105 [0.5]
Managing Change
BUSI 4108 [0.5]
Organizational Learning
BUSI 4607 [0.5]
Management of Technology and Innovation
BUSI 4704 [0.5]
The Business Environment in Europe
CDNS 3610 [0.5]
The Canadian Political Economy Tradition
ECON 3220 [0.5]
Canadian Economic History
ECON 3230 [0.5]
Selected Topics in Economic History
ECON 3300 [0.5]
Public Policy Toward Business
ECON 3360 [0.5]
Introduction to Labour Economics
ECON 3365 [0.5]
Introduction to Industrial Relations
ECON 3370 [0.5]
The Economics of Migration
ECON 3420 [0.5]
Economic Theories of Federalism
ECON 3450 [0.5]
Political Economy in the Modern State
ECON 3460 [0.5]
Introduction to Health Economics
ECON 3508 [0.5]
Introduction to Economic Development
ECON 3600 [0.5]
Introduction to International Economics
ECON 3601 [0.5]
Introduction to International Trade
ECON 3607 [0.5]
Monetary and Financial Institutions
ECON 3801 [0.5]
Regional Economics
ECON 3803 [0.5]
The Economics of Natural Resources
ECON 3807 [0.5]
European Economic Integration
ECON 3820 [0.5]
Topics in Canadian Economic Policy
ECON 3860 [0.5]
Agricultural Economics
ECON 3870 [0.5]
Comparative Economic Systems
GEOG 3404 [0.5]
Geographies of Economic Development
LAWS 3005 [0.5]
Law and Regulation
LAWS 3201 [0.5]
Business Enterprise Frameworks
LAWS 3202 [0.5]
Intellectual Property
LAWS 3205 [0.5]
Consumer Law
LAWS 3208 [0.5]
International Trade Regulation
LAWS 3401 [0.5]
Employment Law
LAWS 3405 [0.5]
Labour Law
LAWS 4200 [0.5]
International Economic Law
LAWS 4507 [0.5]
Administrative Law and Control
PADM 4214 [0.5]
Budgetary Policy in the Public Sector
PADM 4220 [0.5]
Regulation and Public Policy
PADM 4225 [0.5]
Trade Policy
PADM 4226 [0.5]
Tax Policy
PADM 4612 [0.5]
Industrial Policy, Innovation and Sustainable Production
PSCI 4603 [0.5]
Analysis of International Political Economy
PSCI 4805 [0.5]
Political Economy of Global Money and Finance
For the policy stream in Environmental and Sustainable Energy:
3.0 credits from the Environmental and Sustainable Energy electives list below, including 1.0 credit at the 4000 level:
BUSI 3119 [0.5]
Sustainability and the Role of Business
ECON 3300 [0.5]
Public Policy Toward Business
ENST 2001 [0.5]
Sustainable Futures: Environmental Challenges and Solutions
Environmental and Natural Resources
ENST 4006 [0.5]
Environmental Policy Analysis
GEOG 2500 [0.5]
Climate Change: Social Science Perspectives
GEOG 3023 [0.5]
Cities in a Global World
GEOG 3206 [0.5]
Health, Environment, and Society
GEOG 3209 [0.5]
Sustainability and Environment in the South
GEOG 4004 [0.5]
Environmental Impact Assessment
GEOG 4022 [0.5]
Seminar in People, Resources and Environmental Change
HUMR 3503 [0.5]
Global Environmental Justice
LAWS 3005 [0.5]
Law and Regulation
LAWS 3800 [0.5]
Law of Environmental Quality
LAWS 4507 [0.5]
Administrative Law and Control
PADM 4220 [0.5]
Regulation and Public Policy
PADM 4611 [0.5]
Science and Technology Policies
PADM 4612 [0.5]
Industrial Policy, Innovation and Sustainable Production
PADM 4615 [0.5]
Politics and Policy of Energy in Canada
PADM 4616 [0.5]
Environmental Policy
PHIL 2380 [0.5]
Introduction to Environmental Ethics
PSCI 3103 [0.5]
State, Society and Economy in Northeast Asia
PSCI 3703 [0.5]
Governing in the Global Economy
PSCI 3801 [0.5]
Environmental Politics
PSCI 4404 [0.5]
The Design and Evolution of Public Institutions
PSCI 4603 [0.5]
Analysis of International Political Economy
PSCI 4604 [0.5]
Selected Problems in International Political Economy
PSCI 4805 [0.5]
Political Economy of Global Money and Finance
TSES 3002 [0.5]
Energy and Sustainability
TSES 4001 [0.5]
Technology and Society: Risk
TSES 4007 [0.5]
Product Life Cycle Analysis
TSES 4008 [0.5]
Environmentally Harmonious Lifestyles
For the policy stream in Social Policy:
3.0 credits from the Social Policy electives list below, including at least 0.5 credit in PADM or SOWK, 0.5 credit at the 4000 level and 2.0 credits in Social Policy electives:
ECON 3360 [0.5]
Introduction to Labour Economics
ECON 3460 [0.5]
Introduction to Health Economics
GEOG 3023 [0.5]
Cities in a Global World
GEOG 3206 [0.5]
Health, Environment, and Society
GEOG 3501 [0.5]
Geographies of the Canadian North
GEOG 4303 [0.5]
Urban Planning
HIST 3510 [0.5]
Indigenous Peoples of Canada
HLTH 3103 [0.5]
Health Policy and Canada's Health Care System
LAWS 3001 [0.5]
Women and the Legal Process
LAWS 3503 [0.5]
Equality and Discrimination
LAWS 3504 [0.5]
Law and Aboriginal Peoples
LAWS 3506 [0.5]
Administrative Law
LAWS 3508 [0.5]
Health Law
LAWS 4507 [0.5]
Administrative Law and Control
LAWS 4607 [0.5]
Immigration and Refugee Law
PADM 4213 [0.5]
Gender and Public Policy
PADM 4221 [0.5]
Health Policy in Canada
PADM 4224 [0.5]
Aboriginal Policy
PADM 4227 [0.5]
Education Policy
PADM 4228 [0.5]
Social Policy
PADM 4817 [0.5]
Health Policy in Developing Countries
PSCI 3405 [0.5]
Comparative Public Policy Analysis
PSCI 4006 [0.5]
Legislatures and Representation in Canada
PSCI 4103 [0.5]
The Modern State
PSCI 4403 [0.5]
Reproductive Rights Policy in North America
PSCI 4506 [0.5]
Women and Politics in North America
PSCI 4610 [0.5]
Politics of Migration Management
SOCI 2010 [0.5]
Power and Stratification
SOCI 3300 [0.5]
Studies in the Sociology of Education
SOWK 4102 [0.5]
Indigenous Peoples and Social Policy
SOWK 4103 [0.5]
Practice and Policy in Immigration
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (9.5 credits)
7.  1.0 credit in:1.0
PSCI 2701 [0.5]
Introduction to Research Methods in Political Science
PSCI 2702 [0.5]
Quantitative Research Methods in Political Science
8.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 2501 [0.5]
Law, State and Constitution
LAWS 2502 [0.5]
Law, State and Citizen
9.  1.5 credits in:1.5
ECON 1000 [1.0]
Introduction to Economics
BUSI 3602 [0.5]
Designing Organizational Systems: An Overview
10.  1.0 credit in:1.0
PSCI 2002 [0.5]
& PSCI 2003 [0.5]
Canadian Political Environment
Canadian Political Institutions
or
PSCI 2101 [0.5]
& PSCI 2102 [0.5]
Comparative Politics of the Global North
Comparative Politics of the Global South
11.  1.0 credit from:1.0
HIST 1002 [1.0]
Europe in the 20th Century
HIST 1300 [1.0]
The Making of Canada
HIST 1707 [1.0]
World History
12.  4.0 credits in free electives4.0
Total Credits20.0

Public Affairs and Policy Management (PAPM) Courses

PAPM 1000 [1.0 credit]
Introduction to Public Affairs and Policy Management

The theoretical, philosophical and ethical foundations for the study of public affairs and policy management. Drawing from classic and contemporary texts in political philosophy and theory, students will consider issues relating to the nature of democracy, civic society and social organizations, the public, public affairs and public interest.
Prerequisite(s): registration in the Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management Program.
Lecture and discussion three hours a week.

PAPM 2000 [1.0 credit]
Policy: Analysis, Implementation and Evaluation

The institutions and processes of policy-making, implementation and evaluation. Forces that shape policy deliberations and alternative tools for managing policy action and policy evaluation. Theoretical approaches to understanding the origins of policy, and methods by which programs are designed and assessed.
Prerequisite(s): PAPM 1000 and Good Standing in the Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management program.
Lecture and discussion three hours a week.

PAPM 3000 [0.5 credit]
Policy Research

An examination of the research strategies and techniques relevant to policy analysis and evaluation. Using the case study method, the role of research and research organizations in the policy process is discussed. The issue of ethical dilemmas in policy research is also considered.
Prerequisite(s): PSCI 2701 and PSCI 2702, or COMM 2001, or ECON 2201 and ECON 2202 and Good Standing in the Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management program.
Lecture and discussion three hours a week.

PAPM 3999 [0.0 credit]
Co-operative Work Term



PAPM 4000 [0.5 credit]
Capstone Seminar in Public Affairs and Policy Management

A policy workshop focusing on the application of public affairs analysis to develop problem solving and research skills. The seminar will be policy-focused and organized by area of Specialization in the program. Students, working in small groups, will examine concrete policy problems, actual or simulated, in specific institutional contexts.
Prerequisite(s): PAPM 3000 and Good Standing in the Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management program.
Seminar three hours a week.

PAPM 4100 [0.5 credit]
Special Topics in Public Affairs and Policy Management

Analysis of selected issues in public affairs and policy management not ordinarily treated in the regular course program. The choice of topics will vary from year to year. Students should consult with the College regarding the topic offered.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing in the B.P.A.P.M. program or permission of the Kroeger College.
Seminar three hours per week.

PAPM 4908 [1.0 credit]
Honours Research Essay

The Honours essay, which represents a major research paper in the student's Area of Specialization, is carried out under the direction of a faculty supervisor who is either selected by the candidate or assigned early in the year. The Honours essay is evaluated by both the supervisor and an appointed reader.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing in the Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management program.

Summer session: some of the courses listed in this Calendar are offered during the summer. Hours and scheduling for summer session courses will differ significantly from those reported in the fall/winter Calendar. To determine the scheduling and hours for summer session classes, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Not all courses listed are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for the current session and to determine the term of offering, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Regulations

In addition to the requirements listed here, students must satisfy the University regulations (see the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar.)  Students should consult the College when planning their program and selecting courses.

Academic Performance Evaluation

Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management

Students in the B.P.A.P.M. are subject to the standard Academic Performance Evaluation (APE) process with the following additions and amendments:

  1. Students are in Good Standing at the first APE if they have a Major CGPA of a least 7.0 and an Overall CGPA of at least 7.0. A student who is not in Good Standing but has a Major CGPA of at least 6.0 and an Overall CGPA of at least 6.0 is on Academic Warning. Students with a Major CGPA of less than 6.0 or an Overall CGPA of less than 6.0 are required to leave the program with the status of Continue in Alternate (CA) or the status Dismissed from Program (DP).
  2. Students are in Good Standing at any subsequent APE and at graduation if they have a Major CGPA of at least 6.5 and an Overall CGPA of at least 6.5.
  3. Students who do not receive Good Standing at any subsequent Academic Performance Evaluation will be required to withdraw from the program with the status Continue in Alternate (CA) or the status Dismissed from Program (DP) .

Graduation

Following are the minimum CGPA requirements for B.P.A.P.M. graduation:
Overall CGPA: 6.50
Major CGPA: 6.50

Co-operative Education

Co-operative Education is based on the principle that academic study combined with alternating work periods is an effective method of professional preparation. Work periods at various points in the academic program allow students to acquire experience within their discipline. The Co-operative Education program is a complement to the students' academic studies.

Application Requirements

Students can apply to co-op in one of two ways; directly from high school or after beginning a degree program at Carleton.
If a student is admitted to co-op from high school, their grades will be reviewed two terms to one year prior to their first work term to ensure they continue to meet the academic requirements after their 1st or 2nd year of study. The time at which evaluation takes place depends on the program of study. Students will automatically be notified via their Carleton email account if they are permitted to continue.

Students not admitted to Carleton University with the co-op option on their degree can apply for admission via the co-operative education program website. To view application deadlines, visit carleton.ca/co-op.

Admission to the co-op option is based on the completion of 5.0 or more credits at Carleton University, the CGPA requirement for the students' academic program as well as any course prerequisites. The articulated CGPA for each program is the normal standard for assessment. Please see the specific degree program sections for the unique admission and continuation requirements for each academic program.

English Language Proficiency

Students admitted to Carleton based on CAEL, IELTS or TOEFL assessments and who are required to take an ESL course must take and pass the Oral Proficiency in Communicative Settings (OPECS) Test. The test must be taken before being permitted to register in COOP 1000. Admission to the co-op program can be confirmed with a minimum score of 4+.

Participation Requirements

Once a student has been given admission or continuation confirmation to the co-op option s/he must complete and pass COOP 1000 (a mandatory online 0.0 credit course). Students will have access to this course a minimum of two terms prior to their first work term and will be notified when to register.

Communication with the Co-op Office

Students must maintain contact with the co-op office during their job search and while on a work term. All email communication will be conducted via the students' Carleton email account.

Graduation with the Co-op Designation

In order to graduate with the co-op designation, students must satisfy all requirements for their degree program in addition to the requirements according to each co-op program (i.e. successful completion of three or four work terms).

Note: Participation in the co-op option will add up to one additional year for a student to complete their degree program.

Employment

Although every effort is made to ensure a sufficient number of job postings for all students enrolled in the co-op option of their degree program, no guarantee of employment can be made. Carleton's co-op program operates a competitive job search process and is dependent upon current market conditions. Academic performance, skills, motivation, maturity, attitude and potential will determine whether a student is offered a job. It is the student's responsibility to actively conduct a  job search in addition to participation in the job search process operated by the co-op office. Once a student accepts a co-op job offer (verbally or written), his/her job search will end and access to co-op jobs will be removed for that term. Students that do not successfully obtain a co-op work term are expected to continue with their academic studies. The summer term is the exception to this rule. Students should also note that hiring priority is given to Canadian citizens for co-op positions in the Federal Government of Canada.

Work Term Assessment and Evaluation

To obtain a Satisfactory grade for the co-op work term students must have:

  1. A satisfactory work term evaluation by the co-op employer;
  2. A satisfactory grade on the work term report.

Students must submit a work term report at the completion of each four-month work term. Reports are due on the 16th of April, August, and December and students are notified of due dates through their Carleton email account.

Workplace performance will be assessed by the workplace supervisor. Should a student receive an unsatisfactory rating from their co-op employer, an investigation by the co-op program manager will be undertaken. An unsatisfactory employer evaluation does not preclude a student from achieving an overall satisfactory rating for the work term.

Voluntary Withdrawal from the Co-op Option

Students may withdraw from the co-op option of their degree program during a study term ONLY. Students at work may not withdraw from the work term or the co-op option until s/he has completed the requirements of the work term.

Students are eligible to continue in their regular academic program provided that they meet the academic standards required for continuation.

Involuntary or Required Withdrawal from the Co-op Option

Students may be required to withdraw from the co-op option of their degree program for one or any of the following reasons:

  1. Failure to achieve a grade of SAT in COOP 1000
  2. Failure to pay all co-op related fees
  3. Failure to actively participate in the job search process
  4. Failure to attend all interviews for positions to which the student has applied
  5. Declining more than one job offer during the job search process
  6. Continuing a job search after accepting a co-op position
  7. Failure to be registered in the Co-op Work Term course
  8. Dismissal from a work term by the co-op employer
  9. Leaving a work term without approval by the Co-op manager
  10. Receipt of an unsatisfactory work term evaluation
  11. Submission of an unsatisfactory work term report

Standing and Appeals

The Co-op and Career Services office administers the regulations and procedures that are applicable to all co-op program options. All instances of a student's failure during a work term or other issues directly related to their participation in the co-op option will be reported to the academic department.

Any decision made by the Co-op and Career Services office can be appealed via the normal appeal process within the University.

Registering in Co-op Courses

Students will be registered in a Co-op Work Term course while at work. The number of Co-op Work Term courses that a student is registered in is dependent upon the number of four-month work terms that a student accepts.

Students must be registered as full-time before they begin their co-op job search (2.0 credits). All co-op work terms must be completed before the beginning of the final academic term. Students may not finish their degree on a co-op work term.

International Students

All International Students are required to possess a Co-op Work Permit issued by Citizenship and Immigration Canada before they can begin working. It is illegal to work in Canada without the proper authorization. Students will be provided with a letter of support to accompany their application. Students must submit their application for their permit before being permitted to view and apply for jobs on the Co-op Services database. Confirmation of a position will not be approved until a student can confirm they have received their permit. Students are advised to discuss the application process and requirements with the International Student Services Office.

Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management

The following streams in the Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management offer a co-operative education option:

Public Policy and Administration, Human Rights, Development Studies, International Studies, Communication and IT Policy, Strategic Public Opinion and Policy Analysis and Social Policy.

Students in the Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management must successfully complete three (3) work terms to obtain the co-op designation.

Co-op Admission and Continuation Requirements for Students in the Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management

For admission to and continuation in the co-op option, all students must:

  • Maintain full-time status in each study term (2.0 credits);
  • Be eligible to work in Canada (for off-campus work)
  • Have successfully completed COOP 1000

In addition to the following:

  1. Registered as a full-time student in the B.P.A.P.M. program;
  2. Obtained an overall CGPA of 9.00 or higher calculated on at least 5.0 credits.
Work/Study Patterns

Work Term Course:  PAPM 3999

Public Policy and Administration, Human Rights, Development Studies, International Studies, Communication and IT Policy, Strategic Opinion and Policy Analysis, Social Policy
Year 1Year 2Year 3Year 4Year 5
TermPatternTermPatternTermPatternTermPatternTermPattern
FallSFallSFallSFallW/SFallS
WinterSWinterSWinterSWinterW/SWinter 
Summer SummerWSummerWSummerS

Legend
S
: Study
W: Work
O: Optional
* indicates recommended work study pattern
** student finds own employer for this work-term.

Admissions Information

Admission Requirements are for the 2017-2018 year only, and are based on the Ontario High School System. Holding the minimum admission requirements only establishes eligibility for consideration. The cut-off averages for admission may be considerably higher than the minimum. See also the General Admission and Procedures section of this Calendar. An overall average of at least 70% is normally required to be considered for admission. Some programs may also require specific course prerequisites and prerequisite averages and/or supplementary admission portfolios. Higher averages are required for admission to programs for which the demand for places by qualified applicants exceeds the number of places available. The overall average required for admission is determined each year on a program by program basis. Consult admissions.carleton.ca for further details.

Degree

  • B.P.A.P.M.

Admission Requirements

First Year

The Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent including a minimum of six 4U or M courses.

Advanced Standing

Applications for admission with advanced standing to the program will be evaluated individually by the Program Management Committee. Advanced standing will be granted only for those courses deemed to be appropriate to the program. On admission, students will not receive credit for courses graded below C-.

Continuation to second year will be guaranteed only to those students who have an overall CGPA of 7.00 or higher and a grade of B- or higher in PAPM 1000.

Co-op Option

Direct Admission to the first year of the Co-op Option

Applicants must:

  1. meet the required overall admission cut-off average and/or prerequisite course average. These averages may be higher than the stated minimum requirements;
  2. be registered as a full-time student in the B.P.A.P.M. program;
  3. be eligible to work in Canada (for off-campus work placements).

Meeting the above requirements only establishes eligibility for admission to the program. The prevailing job market may limit enrolment in the co-op option.

Note: continuation requirements for students previously admitted to the co-op option and admission requirements for the co-op option after beginning the program are described in the Co-operative Education Regulations section of this Calendar.