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Department of Sociology and Anthropology
(Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences)
B750 Loeb Bldg.
613.520.2582
http://carleton.ca/socanth

This section presents the requirements for programs in:

Program Requirements

Sociology
B.A. Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (9.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit from:1.0
SOCI 1001 [0.5]
& SOCI 1002 [0.5]
Introduction to Sociology I
Introduction to Sociology II
SOCI 1003 [1.0]
Introduction to Sociological Perspectives
2.  0.5 credit in:0.5
SOCI 2000 [0.5]
Introduction to Sociological Inquiry
3.  0.5 credit from:0.5
SOCI 2001 [0.5]
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
SOCI 3000 [0.5]
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
4.  0.5 credit from:0.5
SOCI 3002 [0.5]
Quantitative Methods: Research Design and Data Analysis
SOCI 3004 [0.5]
Qualitative Research: Approaches and Strategies
5.  2.0 credits in:2.0
SOCI 2005 [1.0]
Classical Sociological Theory
SOCI 3005 [1.0]
Contemporary Sociological Theory
6.  2.0 credits in SOCI and/or ANTH at the 4000 level2.0
7.  2.5 credits in SOCI and/or ANTH at the 2000 level or above2.5
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (11.0 credits)
8.  0.5 credit in:0.5
ANTH 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to Anthropology
9.  8.0 credits not in SOCI or ANTH8.0
10.  2.5 credits in free electives2.5
Total Credits20.0

Note:  for Item 4 above, registration in SOCI 4900 [1.0] Honours Thesis requires fourth year standing and a CGPA of 10.0 or higher.

Sociology
B.A. Combined Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Sociology Major CGPA (7.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit from:1.0
SOCI 1001 [0.5]
& SOCI 1002 [0.5]
Introduction to Sociology I
Introduction to Sociology II
SOCI 1003 [1.0]
Introduction to Sociological Perspectives
2.  0.5 credit in:0.5
SOCI 2000 [0.5]
Introduction to Sociological Inquiry
3.  0.5 credit from:0.5
SOCI 2001 [0.5]
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
SOCI 3000 [0.5]
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
4.  0.5 credit from:0.5
SOCI 3002 [0.5]
Quantitative Methods: Research Design and Data Analysis
SOCI 3004 [0.5]
Qualitative Research: Approaches and Strategies
5.  1.0 credit in:1.0
SOCI 2005 [1.0]
Classical Sociological Theory
6.  2.0 credits in SOCI and/or ANTH at the 4000 level2.0
7 1.5 credit in SOCI and/or ANTH at the 2000-level or above1.5
B. Additional Requirements (13.0 credits):13.0
8. The requirements for the other discipline must be satisfied
9. Sufficient credits in free electives to make 20.0 credits for the degree
Total Credits20.0

Sociology
B.A. General (15.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (6.0 credits)
1.  1.0 credit from:1.0
SOCI 1001 [0.5]
& SOCI 1002 [0.5]
Introduction to Sociology I
Introduction to Sociology II
SOCI 1003 [1.0]
Introduction to Sociological Perspectives
2.  0.5 credit in:0.5
SOCI 2000 [0.5]
Introduction to Sociological Inquiry
3.  0.5 credit from:0.5
SOCI 2001 [0.5]
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
SOCI 3000 [0.5]
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
4.  1.0 credit in:1.0
SOCI 2005 [1.0]
Classical Sociological Theory
5.  1.5 credits in SOCI at the 3000-level or above1.5
6.  1.5 credits in SOCI at the 2000-level or above1.5
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (9.0 credits)
7.  0.5 credit in:0.5
ANTH 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to Anthropology
8.  6.0 credits not in SOCI or ANTH 6.0
9.  2.5 credits in free electives2.5
Total Credits15.0

Stream in Social Justice (2.0 credits)

The Stream in Social Justice is open to all students in Sociology Honours and Combined Honours programs.

Requirements:
1.  0.5 credit in:0.5
SOCI 2170 [0.5]
Foundations in Social Justice
2.  0.5 credit in:0.5
SOCI 3170 [0.5]
Social Justice in Action
3.  0.5 credit in:0.5
SOCI 3430 [0.5]
Studies in Collective Action and Social Movements
4.  0.5 credit in:0.5
SOCI 4170 [0.5]
Community-Engaged Sociology
Total Credits2.0

 Bachelor of Global and International Studies (B.G.In.S.)

Note: Details regarding graduation requirements, the international experience requirement, and the language requirement for the B.G.In.S. degree can be found at the B.G.In.S. program page.

Specialization in Global Inequalities and Social Change
B.G.In.S. Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (12.0 credits)
1.  4.5 credits in: Core Courses4.5
GINS 1000 [0.5]
Global History
GINS 1010 [0.5]
International Law and Politics
GINS 1020 [0.5]
Ethnography, Globalization and Culture
GINS 2000 [0.5]
Ethics and Globalization
GINS 2010 [0.5]
Globalization and International Economic Issues
GINS 2020 [0.5]
Global Literatures
GINS 3010 [0.5]
Global and International Theory
GINS 3020 [0.5]
Places, Boundaries, Movements and Global Environmental Change
GINS 4090 [0.5]
Honours Seminar in Global and International Studies
2.  7.5 credits in: the Specialization
a. 1.0 credit in: Foundations1.0
SOCI 1001 [0.5]
& SOCI 1002 [0.5]
Introduction to Sociology I
Introduction to Sociology II
Or:
SOCI 1003 [1.0]
Introduction to Sociological Perspectives
b. 1.5 credits in: Research Methods1.5
SOCI 2000 [0.5]
Introduction to Sociological Inquiry
And 1.0 credit from:
SOCI 2001 [0.5]
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
SOCI 3000 [0.5]
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
SOCI 3002 [0.5]
Quantitative Methods: Research Design and Data Analysis
SOCI 3004 [0.5]
Qualitative Research: Approaches and Strategies
c. 1.0 credit in: Theory1.0
SOCI 2005 [1.0]
Classical Sociological Theory
d. 1.0 credit from: Global Inequalities and Social Change at the 2000-level1.0
SOCI 2010 [0.5]
Power and Stratification
SOCI 2020 [0.5]
Race and Ethnicity
SOCI 2030 [0.5]
Work, Industry and Occupations
SOCI 2045 [0.5]
Gender and Society
SOCI 2160 [0.5]
War and Society
SOCI 2702 [0.5]
Power and Everyday Life
SOCI 2705 [0.5]
Popular Culture in the Digital Age
e. 1.5 credits from: Global Inequalities and Social Change at the 3000-level1.5
SOCI 3005 [1.0]
Contemporary Sociological Theory
SOCI 3010 [0.5]
Studies in Power and Stratification
SOCI 3019 [0.5]
Sociology of International Migration
SOCI 3020 [0.5]
Studies in Race and Ethnicity
SOCI 3027 [0.5]
Globalization and Human Rights
SOCI 3030 [0.5]
Studies in Work, Industry and Occupations: Authority and Expertise
SOCI 3040 [0.5]
Studies in the Sociology of Gender
SOCI 3045 [0.5]
Children and Childhood in a Globalized World
SOCI 3160 [0.5]
Political Violence
SOCI 3430 [0.5]
Studies in Collective Action and Social Movements
SOCI 3805 [0.5]
Studies in Population
f. 1.5 credits from: Honours Seminars and Honours Thesis1.5
SOCI 4010 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in Power and Stratification
SOCI 4020 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in Race and Ethnicity
SOCI 4030 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in Work, Industry and Occupations
SOCI 4039 [0.5]
Women in Contemporary Middle East Societies
SOCI 4040 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in the Sociology of Gender
SOCI 4160 [0.5]
War, Terrorism and State Terrorism
SOCI 4200 [0.5]
War, Security and Citizenship
SOCI 4730 [0.5]
Colonialism and Post-Colonialism
SOCI 4750 [0.5]
Advanced Studies in Globalization and Citizenship
SOCI 4900 [1.0]
Honours Thesis
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (8.0 credits)
3.  8.0 credits in: Free Electives8.0
C. Additional Requirements
4. The International Experience requirement must be met.
5. The Language requirement must be met.
Total Credits20.0

Stream in Global Inequalities and Social Change
B.G.In.S. General (15.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (8.0 credits)
1.  4.0 credits in: Core Courses4.0
GINS 1000 [0.5]
Global History
GINS 1010 [0.5]
International Law and Politics
GINS 1020 [0.5]
Ethnography, Globalization and Culture
GINS 2000 [0.5]
Ethics and Globalization
GINS 2010 [0.5]
Globalization and International Economic Issues
GINS 2020 [0.5]
Global Literatures
GINS 3010 [0.5]
Global and International Theory
GINS 3020 [0.5]
Places, Boundaries, Movements and Global Environmental Change
2.  4.0 credits from: the Stream4.0
a. Foundations
SOCI 1001 [0.5]
& SOCI 1002 [0.5]
Introduction to Sociology I
Introduction to Sociology II
Or:
SOCI 1003 [1.0]
Introduction to Sociological Perspectives
b. Research Methods
SOCI 2000 [0.5]
Introduction to Sociological Inquiry
SOCI 2001 [0.5]
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
SOCI 3000 [0.5]
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
SOCI 3002 [0.5]
Quantitative Methods: Research Design and Data Analysis
SOCI 3004 [0.5]
Qualitative Research: Approaches and Strategies
c. Sociological Theory
SOCI 2005 [1.0]
Classical Sociological Theory
SOCI 3005 [1.0]
Contemporary Sociological Theory
d. Global Inequalities and Social Change Electives
SOCI 2010 [0.5]
Power and Stratification
SOCI 2020 [0.5]
Race and Ethnicity
SOCI 2030 [0.5]
Work, Industry and Occupations
SOCI 2045 [0.5]
Gender and Society
SOCI 2160 [0.5]
War and Society
SOCI 2702 [0.5]
Power and Everyday Life
SOCI 2705 [0.5]
Popular Culture in the Digital Age
SOCI 3010 [0.5]
Studies in Power and Stratification
SOCI 3019 [0.5]
Sociology of International Migration
SOCI 3020 [0.5]
Studies in Race and Ethnicity
SOCI 3027 [0.5]
Globalization and Human Rights
SOCI 3030 [0.5]
Studies in Work, Industry and Occupations: Authority and Expertise
SOCI 3040 [0.5]
Studies in the Sociology of Gender
SOCI 3045 [0.5]
Children and Childhood in a Globalized World
SOCI 3160 [0.5]
Political Violence
SOCI 3430 [0.5]
Studies in Collective Action and Social Movements
SOCI 3805 [0.5]
Studies in Population
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (7.0 credits)
3.  7.0 credits in: Free Electives7.0
C. Additional Requirements
4. The Language requirement must be met.
Total Credits15.0

Minor in Sociology (4.0 credits)

Open to all undergraduate degree students in programs other than Sociology or the B.G.In.S. Stream/Specialization in Global Inequalities and Social Change.  Students in any Anthropology major should select courses carefully if they wish to use courses from the major in their minor Sociology. Such students should always consult the department.

Requirements
1.  1.0 credit from:1.0
SOCI 1001 [0.5]
& SOCI 1002 [0.5]
Introduction to Sociology I
Introduction to Sociology II
SOCI 1003 [1.0]
Introduction to Sociological Perspectives
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
Methods: SOCI 2000 plus one of SOCI 2001 or SOCI 3000
or
Theory: SOCI 2005
3.  2.0 credits in SOCI at the 2000-level or above2.0
4. The remaining requirements of the major discipline(s) and degree must be satisfied.
Total Credits4.0

Mention : Français (4.0 credits)

Students who wish to quality for the Mention : Français notation in Sociology-Anthropology may do so by including the following pattern of courses in their degree program. Additional information about the Mention : Français can be found under the Regulations for the Bachelor of Arts.

Requirements:
1.  1.0 credit in the advanced study of the French language:1.0
FREN 1100 [1.0]
Intermediate French
2.  1.0 credit in French-Canadian culture and heritage1.0
3.  1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level in Sociology and/or Anthropology taught in French at Carleton or at another university, and approved by the B.A. General or B.A. Honours porgram coordinators.1.0
4. In addition, for B.A. Honours Sociology or Anthropology, 1.0 credit at the 4000-level in Sociology or Anthropology taught in French at Carleton or at another university, as approved by the respective B.A. Honours program coordinator.1.0
Total Credits4.0

Sociology (SOCI) Courses

SOCI 1001 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Sociology I

Introduction to the comparative study of social groups, classes and institutions. The main emphasis is on industrialized societies with special attention given to Canadian society.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 1000 and SOCI 1003 [1.0].
Lectures three hours a week.

SOCI 1002 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Sociology II

Sociological inquiry into current issues in Canadian society. Topics may include gender, racial and class inequality, health, education, crime, environment, urbanization and globalization.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 1000 (no longer offered), SOCI 1003 [1.0], SOCI 1005.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001.
Lectures three hours a week.

SOCI 1003 [1.0 credit]
Introduction to Sociological Perspectives

Introduction to the comparative study of social groups, classes and institutions. The main emphasis is on industrialized societies with special attention given to Canadian societies.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 1000, SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002.
Lectures three hours a week.

SOCI 1005 [0.5 credit]
Sociology for Bachelor of Commerce Students

The origins of sociology, why sociology matters, and how it is practiced. Concepts such as class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, work, organization, and social movements help students develop their sociological 'eye' for thinking critically about society and their place within it.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 1002.
Prerequisite(s): restricted to B.Com. students.
Lectures three hours a week.

SOCI 2000 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Sociological Inquiry

This course introduces students to sociological research. Students will learn about the different approaches to sociological research and the epistemological foundations of various methodologies. Topics may include research ethics, the connections between theory and method, and the strengths and limitations of different research strategies.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003.
Lecture/discussion groups three hours per week.

SOCI 2001 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods

Introduction to the theory and practice of qualitative sociological research. Topics may include: the logic of the research process; qualitative research and research design; data collection and analysis; ethics; historical development of qualitative methods; key historical and contemporary research projects using qualitative methods.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 2003.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0].
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2005 [1.0 credit]
Classical Sociological Theory

Theoretical approaches to the study of sociology within their historical, social and intellectual contexts. Particular attention to original texts by Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, among others.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0].
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2010 [0.5 credit]
Power and Stratification

Theoretical and empirical examination of social class, with an emphasis upon Canada. Topics relating to class might include education, health care, politics, and labour force participation.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 3405 and SOCI 3407.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lectures three hours a week.

SOCI 2020 [0.5 credit]
Race and Ethnicity

Introduction to some of the recent theoretical literature and research on the issues of race, racism and ethnicity. Concepts, controversies and definitions dealing with race and ethnicity from the Canadian context and internationally.
Also listed as ANTH 2020.
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2030 [0.5 credit]
Work, Industry and Occupations

An analysis of work practices and settings in societies. Topics of interest include the development of industrial and postindustrial societies; the experience of work, the structuring of work in organizations and in the society; conflict, resistance and labour relations, and the impact of new technologies.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2035 [0.5 credit]
Technology, Culture and Society

Introduction to the principal theories and methods used by Science and Technology Studies (STS) scholars to examine the social and cultural shaping of technology. The substantive focus of the course is on the design, development, production, diffusion, consumption and use of technology.
Also listed as DIGH 2035.
Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 or ANTH 1002 or ANTH 1003 [1.0], or 1.0 credit at the 1000-level in SOCI, ENGL, GEOG, HIST, HUMR, INDG, PSCI, RELI or WGST.
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2040 [0.5 credit]
Food, Culture and Society

The sociological analysis of food and eating. The relationship between food and identity; the development of social movements organized around food; and more generally, on practices relating to the production, preparation, and consumption of food.
Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1001 or ANTH 1002 or ANTH 1003 [1.0], or 1.0 credit at the 1000-level in SOCI, ENGL, GEOG, HIST, HUMR, INDG, PSCI, RELI or WGST.
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2043 [0.5 credit]
Sociology of the Family

Examination of contemporary marriage and family life with emphasis on Canadian society. Current perspectives on how family is conceptualized and changing trends in the social institution of family are highlighted.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2045 [0.5 credit]
Gender and Society

How gender and gender relations play out in everyday lives, and how people resist, reproduce, or reinforce gender norms. Considers how gender shapes experiences of family, school, work, media, relationships, bodies, violence, etc. Canadian and global cases are examined.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 2407 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2050 [0.5 credit]
Sociology of Health

Critical approach to understanding health, illness and healthcare and the extent to which social, cultural, political and economic factors affect our health, our experiences with illness, and our encounters with healthcare systems.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2150 [0.5 credit]
Social Psychology

Relationship between the individual and the social system. Emphasis on integrating individual and social approaches. Topics include attitudes, cognition, motivations, group processes such as socialization, symbolic interaction, coercion, conformity, leadership, cohesion.
Precludes additional credit for PSYC 2100.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2160 [0.5 credit]
War and Society

Sociological theory and research on large-scale conflict. How society and culture shape warfare through processes of socialization, bureaucratization, and ideological representation. Social impacts of war in terms of gender, race and ethnicity, class relations, and cultural values.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing.
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2170 [0.5 credit]
Foundations in Social Justice

Introduction to the study of social justice and the theorization of social justice sociology. Critical examination of resistance to oppression, social movements and solidarity both in Canada and transnationally. Exploration of the relationship between the university and community-based action.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003.
Lectures and discussion three hours a week.

SOCI 2200 [0.5 credit]
Canadian Society

Theoretical and empirical examination of Canadian social structure. Substantive topics might include demographics, inequalities, the state and social movements.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2445 [0.5 credit]
Sociology of Deviance

The construction of deviant behaviour and the consequences of such construction for both deviant and conforming persons. Emphasis upon deviance as a normal and necessary result of the socio-cultural processes resulting from, and affecting the activities of a viable society.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 2505.
Prerequisite(s): grade of C- or higher in SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or in ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2450 [0.5 credit]
Criminology

The study of the criminal justice system response to crime and deviance. Institutional arrangements are examined as are the policies and programs by which society reacts to crime.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 2701.
Prerequisite(s): grade of C- or higher in SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or in ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 2702 [0.5 credit]
Power and Everyday Life

A thematic investigation of the intersection of relations of power and culture in everyday life. Topics may include leisure, consumption, identity, fashion, sexuality, tourism, health, skills, pollution and work.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lectures three hours a week.

SOCI 2705 [0.5 credit]
Popular Culture in the Digital Age

An examination of various approaches to analyzing digital media and their role in the production and consumption of contemporary cultural forms and practices. Students will reflect upon their use of digital media and the influence they have on their lives and popular culture, more generally.
Also listed as DIGH 2705.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002 or SOCI 1003 [1.0] or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002 or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 2810 [0.5 credit]
Selected Topics in Sociology

Selected topics in sociology not ordinarily treated in the regular course program. The choice of topics varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003, or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003.
Lecture/discussion groups three hours a week.

SOCI 2820 [0.5 credit]
Selected Topics in Sociology

Selected topics in sociology not ordinarily treated in the regular course program. The choice of topics varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 2910 [0.5 credit]
Course-Related Tutorials in Sociology

Consult the Department for information.

SOCI 2920 [0.5 credit]
Course-Related Tutorials in Sociology

Consult the Department for information.

SOCI 3000 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods

Students will learn about issues of research design, univariate and bivariate analysis, the Chi-square test of significance and measures of association, as well as the relationship between samples and populations.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 2002.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002 or SOCI 1003 [1.0].
Lectures and computer lab three hours a week.

SOCI 3002 [0.5 credit]
Quantitative Methods: Research Design and Data Analysis

Introduction to multivariate statistics in sociology. Descriptive statistics, foundations of statistical inference, overview of selected hypothesis tests, bivariate correlations and regression, introduction to multiple regression. Analysis of sociological data using SPSS.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 3003.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 3000 or CRCJ 3001 and third-year standing.
Lecture/discussion groups three hours a week.

SOCI 3004 [0.5 credit]
Qualitative Research: Approaches and Strategies

Introduction to qualitative research design, data collection, and data analysis. Topics may include: sampling, data collection methods, archival research, computer assisted qualitative data analysis (e.g. NVivo, Atlas, Ti), research values and ethics, epistemological issues in research. reflexivity; writing up qualitative research.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 2001 and third-year standing.

SOCI 3005 [1.0 credit]
Contemporary Sociological Theory

Developments in theoretical sociology since the mid-twentieth century such as systems theory, structuralism and post-structuralism, ethnomethodology, feminism and modern Marxism.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 4006.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 2005 and third-year standing.
Lectures and discussion three hours a week.

SOCI 3010 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Power and Stratification

Theoretical and empirical examination of the bases of structured inequality. Topics might include, in cross-national perspective, social class, gender, race and ethnicity, and age.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 2010 and third-year standing.
Lectures and discussion three hours a week.

SOCI 3019 [0.5 credit]
Sociology of International Migration

This course draws from global and interdisciplinary theoretical perspectives to examine primarily though not exclusively Canadian immigration policy and the socio-historical forces shaping policy, migration patterns, permanent, temporary and circular migration, the experiences of immigrants, refugees and migrants; and diasporic and transnational communities and identities.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from: (SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002) or SOCI 1003 [1.0] or (ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002) or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third year standing.

SOCI 3020 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Race and Ethnicity

Race, racism and ethnicity in Canada and internationally. Critical perspectives on race and ethnicity, which intersect with other social relations. Racism, Eurocentrism, Orientalism, nationalism, colonialism, international migration, citizenship, and diasporic cultures.
Also listed as ANTH 3020.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the instructor.
Lectures three hours a week.

SOCI 3027 [0.5 credit]
Globalization and Human Rights

Examination of the various dimensions and meanings of globalization and its relationship with human rights, with emphasis on the implications of the emerging global economy for economic, social, political and cultural rights.
Also listed as ANTH 3027, PSCI 3802.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Lectures three hours a week.

SOCI 3030 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Work, Industry and Occupations: Authority and Expertise

The nature and place of expert knowledge in societies. The development of the practices and organization of the professions and their relation to social stratification, the state, patriarchy and gender; the systematic development of knowledge in societies.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 2508.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing.
Lectures three hours a week.

SOCI 3035 [0.5 credit]
Science, Culture and Society: Social Studies of Science

Principal theories and methods used by Science and Technology Studies scholars to examine the social construction of scientific knowledge. Topics may include the demarcation of science from non-science, the relationship between experts and laypersons, and the study of scientific controversies.
Also listed as ANTH 3035.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the instructor.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3038 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Urban Sociology

Issues related to people and the urban environment, including the historical process of urbanization, rural-urban transition, the diffusion of urban values and life styles, contemporary urban problems such as urban renewal, pollution and the pressures of the urban environment on social institutions.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 2504.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3040 [0.5 credit]
Studies in the Sociology of Gender

Sociological and feminist perspectives; applied understandings of gender, gender relations; women's and men's lives in contemporary Canadian society and in historical and cross-cultural terms. Multiple intersections between gender, race, ethnicity, class and sexuality.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 2043 or SOCI 2045 and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3044 [0.5 credit]
Sociology of Sex and Sexuality

Key concepts of sex, sexuality, gender, eroticism and pleasure. The history of sex and sexuality with reference to heterosexuality. The regulation of sexual relations and practices. Why are sex and morals linked? Sex and marriage: monogamy and serial monogamy. Sex, love and intimacy. The sexual revolution and the possibility of sexual equality.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0] or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0].
Lectures and discussion three hours a week.

SOCI 3045 [0.5 credit]
Children and Childhood in a Globalized World

A socio-historical and cross-cultural exploration of constructions, deconstructions, and the experience of childhood in Canada and internationally. Compulsory schooling, child labour, protection and regulation in law, the commodification and equalization of childhood, children's social movements, and the emergence of children's rights discourses.
Also listed as ANTH 3045.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3050 [0.5 credit]
Studies in the Sociology of Health

Current theory and research on health, disease and social responses to health issues. Topics include population differences incidence and prevalence of morbidity and mortality, access to care and government health policy. Focus upon cultural definitions of health and their consequences for health promotion practices.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 3705.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3055 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Addictions

Survey of alcohol and other drug use in cross-cultural and sub-group perspectives. Relationships between culture, social structure and patterns of use of psychoactive substances. Topics may include: substance use and the life cycle; gender and psychoactive substances; problem and non-problem use.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 3001.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3056 [0.5 credit]
Women and Health

Women's health issues and how they relate to social, political and economic factors. The intersection of gender, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation and able-bodiedness with women's health.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002 or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001and ANTH 1002 or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Seminar 3 hours per week.

SOCI 3100 [0.5 credit]
Situation, Sense and Sociation

Analysis of the influence of one of the senses (space, movement, touch, scent, taste, vision, hearing) on sociation. Multiple sections may be offered in a term.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 2150.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3160 [0.5 credit]
Political Violence

Sociological examination of political violence. Theoretical analysis of violence as social action that is historically situated and shaped by cultural and economic forces; the relationship between political violence and identity, nation/nationalism, modernity and globalisation.
Prerequisite(s): third year standing.
Lectures and workshop three hours a week.

SOCI 3170 [0.5 credit]
Social Justice in Action

Current debates in social justice theory and practice. The course includes substantial engagement with community actors, including activists and advocates as guest speakers. Students will be exposed to social justice principles applied in the community through a variety of approaches.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 2170 and third-year standing.
Lectures and discussion three hours a week.

SOCI 3210 [0.5 credit]
Selected Topics in Sociology

Selected topics in sociology not ordinarily treated in the regular course program. The choice of topics varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3220 [0.5 credit]
Selected Topics in Sociology

Selected topics in sociology not ordinarily treated in the regular course program. The choice of topics varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3300 [0.5 credit]
Studies in the Sociology of Education

Critical analysis of selected work in educational sociology. Topics may include sociological theories of education, school ethnography, contemporary educational policy and practice. Note: Topic will vary in keeping with the interests of students and instructor.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3400 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Criminal Justice Policy

An examination of criminal justice policy in Canada with an emphasis on conflicting ideologies and the dynamics of policy-making decisions. Consideration is given to the relationship between criminal justice policy and other aspects of social change.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 3703.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 2445 and SOCI 2450 and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3410 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Criminal Justice

Developments in criminal justice are examined in the context of broader social issues. Particular emphasis will be placed on contemporary developments in criminal justice institutions, programs and practices.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 3808.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 2445 and SOCI 2450 and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3420 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Gender and Criminal Justice

An overview of current issues related to women as both perpetrators and victims of crime and the Canadian criminal justice system's response to them. Topics may include woman abuse, sexual assault, and federally sentenced women.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 3201.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], and SOCI 2450 and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3430 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Collective Action and Social Movements

Survey of the the effects of collective action on social change. Topics may include social movements, protest and activism, crowds, fads rumour or gossip.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 3408.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing. SOCI 2150 is recommended but not required.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3450 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Law Enforcement

A comparative examination of contemporary law enforcement. Topics may include public versus private policing, centralized versus decentralized policing, and transnational policing.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 3507.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 2450 and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3480 [0.5 credit]
Studies in the Sociology of Law

Development of law in relation to modernity and capitalism through the theories of Marx, Durkheim, Weber and Foucault.
Also listed as LAWS 3106.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 3801.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3570 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Art, Culture and Society

Thematic investigation of genres, forms and styles of art, culture and society. Topics may include current debates on social structure and artistic creativity; ideology, cultural memory and politics, patronage and art; cross-cultural representations, taste, social mobility and art; modernism and the avant-garde.
Also listed as ANTH 3570.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing or permission of the instructor.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3710 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Cultural Studies

Research and theory in the interdisciplinary area of Cultural Studies. Contemporary cultural change in the advanced industrialized societies and its impact on everyday life.
Precludes additional credit for ANTH 3710.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3780 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Power and Everyday Life

Continuing inquiry into the relations between power and various facets of everyday life. Topics may include consumption, leisure, identity, fashion, food, tourism, health and popular culture.
Precludes additional credit for ANTH 3780.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3805 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Population

Introduction to historical and recent debates on population growth. Examination of changes in marriage, fertility, mortality and migration from an international perspective. Causes and consequences of demographic change.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 2002.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3810 [0.5 credit]
Studies in Social Policy

A critical examination of selected areas of social policy. Topics might include health care, education, and aboriginal policies.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], and third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

SOCI 3910 [0.5 credit]
Course-Related Tutorials in Sociology

Consult the Department for information, as departmental permission is required.

SOCI 3920 [0.5 credit]
Course-Related Tutorials in Sociology

Consult the Department for information, as departmental permission is required.

SOCI 3999 [0.0 credit]
Co-operative Work Term


SOCI 4002 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Sociological Theory

Close study of the works of an author, tendency, or school of thought in theoretical sociology. Topic will vary in keeping with interests of the students and instructor.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 3005 and fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4003 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Qualitative Research

In-depth study into selected issues in qualitative research design, implementation and data analysis. Topics covered may include participant observation, ethnomethodology, ethnography, grounded theory, discourse analysis, narrative analysis, textual analysis, and document analysis. Intersections between epistemologies and methodologies.
Precludes additional credit for ANTH 4003.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 2001 and SOCI 2002 and fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4008 [0.5 credit]
Contemporary Issues in Sociology

Reflexive work on sociology as a discipline or on the capacity of sociology to engage with matters of contention in the contemporary world. Topic will vary in keeping with interests of students and instructor.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 3005 and fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4009 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Quantitative Research

Study of specific quantitative methodological issues. Focus may be on one or two of the following topics: quantitative research design, sampling techniques, survey research methods and various statistical research methods including OLS and logistic regression.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 4840.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 3003 and fourth-year standing.
Seminar and lab three hours a week.

SOCI 4010 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Power and Stratification

A research-oriented seminar examining structured social inequalities.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4020 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Race and Ethnicity

Selected topics in race and ethnicity in an international context. Specific topics will vary according to instructors' research interests.
Also listed as ANTH 4020.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4030 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Work, Industry and Occupations

A research-oriented seminar that may focus on one or more of the following topics: Work, Organization and Technology; Developments in the Labour Process; Work, Organization and Gender; Organizational Theory; Work and Leisure; Labour Movements; and Work, Organizations and Culture.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4036 [0.5 credit]
Science and Technology Studies: Selected Topics

The course is concerned with broadening students’ understanding of Science and Technology Studies by focussing on a particular topic relevant to this field of study. The topic selected will vary from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
Also listed as ANTH 4036.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 4401.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4038 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Urban Cultures

A research-oriented seminar on social and cultural aspects of urban life, drawing on the local region. Topics may include social space, planning, mobility, diasporic cultures, the metropolis and civil society, the global city and virtual forms of the urban.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4039 [0.5 credit]
Women in Contemporary Middle East Societies

The socio-economic, political and cultural realities of Middle Eastern women with focus on their lived experiences, voices and stories. Different countries will be chosen as case studies each year.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003 [1.0], or ANTH 1001 and ANTH 1002, or ANTH 1003 [1.0], and fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4040 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in the Sociology of Gender

Gender and gender relations; intersections between gender, race, ethnicity, class and sexuality. Topics may include gender divisions of labour, employment, domestic life, violence, sexualities, men and masculinities, cross-cultural issues, body image, media, sport, education and religion.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4043 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in the Sociology of the Family

A research-oriented seminar focusing on social policy and family form. Topics may include: immigrant families, divorce, reconstructed families, lone parenting, family poverty, the elderly, motherhood, fatherhood, family roles, and childcare practices.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4045 [0.5 credit]
Sociology of Sex and Sexuality: Selected Topics

Themes within the sociology of sex and sexuality. The topic selected will vary from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4100 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Situation, Sense and Sociation

The class designs and implements a common fieldwork project of its choosing. Students submit their own analysis of the results.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 3100 and fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4160 [0.5 credit]
War, Terrorism and State Terrorism

Critical theoretical and empirical analysis of violent political conflict. Examination of transformations and continuities of war, terrorism and state terrorism; modalities of political violence, such as torture or disappearance; responses to violent conflict; and the representation and construction of political violence.
Prerequisite(s): fourth year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4170 [0.5 credit]
Community-Engaged Sociology

Students will apply their sociological education working with community organizations in small teams to research issues and advocate for positive social change. Each team’s project will include public education, sociological analysis and creating a tangible product for the partner organization.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 3170 and SOCI 3430 with a grade of B+ or higher in each and fourth-year standing, or permission from the instructor of SOCI 4170.
Lectures, discussion and project work three hours a week.

SOCI 4200 [0.5 credit]
War, Security and Citizenship

Critical theoretical and multidisciplinary examination of violent conflict, security and citizenship. How wars produce a variety of abject and new subjects, create and reproduce citizenship hierarchies, and expand and contract citizenship entitlements.
Also listed as ANTH 4200.
Prerequisite(s): fourth year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4410 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Criminology

Crime, criminal justice, social processes relating to the implementation of criminal justice policy, or other aspects of criminality and deviance.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4420 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Gender and Criminal Justice

Critical overview of sociological perspectives on women within the criminal justice system. Conceptual, theoretical, methodological and policy issues.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4430 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Youth Culture and Juvenile Justice

Establishment and development of the youth justice system in Canada; analysis of juvenile justice policy in relation to crime patterns and youth culture; emphasis on the federal Young Offenders Act and its consequences for the juvenile justice system.
Precludes additional credit for SOCI 4704.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4480 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in the Sociology of Law

Contemporary debates about the role of law in society focusing on the potential and limits of law as a vehicle of social transformation.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4650 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Power and Everyday Life

Examination of a selected topic in Power and Everyday Life. Topics to be announced in advance each year.
Precludes additional credit for ANTH 4650.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4701 [0.5 credit]
Special Topic in Criminal Justice and Social Policy

Examination of a selected topic in criminal justice and social policy. Topics to be announced.
Also listed as LAWS 4701, SOWK 4701.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Hours to be arranged.

SOCI 4702 [0.5 credit]
Special Topic in Criminal Justice and Social Policy

Examination of a selected topic in criminal justice and social policy. Topics to be announced.
Also listed as LAWS 4702, SOWK 4702.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Hours to be arranged.

SOCI 4703 [0.5 credit]
Special Topic in Criminal Justice and Social Policy

Examination of a selected topic in criminal justice and social policy. Topics to be announced.
Also listed as LAWS 4703, SOWK 4703.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Hours to be arranged.

SOCI 4710 [0.5 credit]
Directed Research in Power and Everyday Life

A directed research project to be selected in consultation with a member of faculty. Research projects will focus on aspects of the intersection of power and everyday life.
Precludes additional credit for ANTH 4710.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing. Contact hours to be negotiated with the research supervisor.


SOCI 4720 [0.5 credit]
Research Placement in Power and Everyday Life

A supervised research placement directly related to the activities of an organized research unit at Carleton University or other approved organization.
Precludes additional credit for ANTH 4720.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Contact hours to be negotiated with the research supervisor.

SOCI 4730 [0.5 credit]
Colonialism and Post-Colonialism

Comparative ethnographic and historical approaches to colonialism including topics such as the formation of colonial regimes, colonial governmentality, servile labour systems, missionization, anti-colonial resistance, cultural hybridization and post-colonial memory. Exploration of debates over the relation between colonialism and the production of social scientific knowledge.
Also listed as ANTH 4730.
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing or permission of the instructor.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4740 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Subjectivity

The experience of selfhood and identity in social and cultural context. Regimes of the body, practices of self-formation, consumption, pleasure, sexuality and social domination. Topic will vary in keeping with interests of students and instructor.
Precludes additional credit for ANTH 4740.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4750 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Globalization and Citizenship

Selected topics on the confluence of processes of globalization, development and citizenship; examination of debates about the meaning and impact of globalization on patterns of inequality and citizenship both internationally and within Canada, and about strategies for progressive development.
Also listed as ANTH 4750.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4760 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Time and Space

The organization and experience of time and/or space in social and cultural context. Techniques of time discipline, politics of social memory, rhythms of everyday life, etc. Social distance, interchanges, the collapse of space, positioning etc. Topic will vary in keeping with interests of students and instructor.
Precludes additional credit for ANTH 4760.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4770 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Governmentality

Starting from Foucault's concept of `governmentality', the course explores the discourses, rationalities, and practices of governing; the way in which `governing others' is linked to `self-governance.'.
Precludes additional credit for ANTH 4770.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4810 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Social Policy

An examination of sociological research and social intervention.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4820 [0.5 credit]
Field Placement: Research and Analysis

Students participate in a supervised research placement with a government agency, community organization or faculty member. A written summary of the student's research activities is graded.
Prerequisite(s): SOCI 3003 and fourth-year standing and permission of the Department.

SOCI 4830 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Studies in Applied Social Research

Practical application of social research insights and technique to topics of interest in public policy and consultancy arenas. Topics include research design, data collection, ethics, data ownership, policy implications, proposal writing, research resource location, secondary data analysis, development of research strategies, and effective report writing.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4850 [0.5 credit]
Contemporary Problems in Sociology

Selected problems in sociology not ordinarily treated in the regular course program. The choice of topics varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4860 [0.5 credit]
Contemporary Problems in Sociology

Selected problems in sociology not ordinarily treated in the regular course program. The choice of topics varies from year to year. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

SOCI 4900 [1.0 credit]
Honours Thesis

This course is designed to help Honours candidates conceptualise and write a major research essay. Students develop their essay proposal and Honours Thesis through discussion and criticism in seminars. Common problems of style, sources, conceptualization, research design, analysis and interpretation are discussed.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing in the Sociology B.A. Honours with a CGPA of 9.00 or higher in the Major or by permission from the instructor. Students are strongly encouraged to locate a faculty member to supervise their Honours Thesis prior to the start of this course.
Seminars on a bi-weekly basis (three hours).

SOCI 4910 [0.5 credit]
Tutorial in Sociology

Consult the Department for information.

SOCI 4920 [0.5 credit]
Tutorial in Sociology

Consult the Department for information.

SOCI 4930 [1.0 credit]
Directed Research

Directed studies to investigate a particular topic.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing in Sociology and permission of the department. Enrolment is limited to Honours students with a CGPA in Sociology of 9.00 or higher and a proposal approved by the Honours Committee.

Summer session: some of the courses listed in this Calendar are offered during the summer. Hours and scheduling for summer session courses will differ significantly from those reported in the fall/winter Calendar. To determine the scheduling and hours for summer session classes, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Not all courses listed are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for the current session and to determine the term of offering, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Regulations

First Year Courses
Students may receive credit for  SOCI 1001 and SOCI 1002, or SOCI 1003. Only one of these credits will be included in the Major CGPA. The other will count against the total number of credits in sociology and/or anthropology.

B.A. Regulations

The regulations presented below apply to all Bachelor of Arts programs. In addition to the requirements presented here, students must satisfy the University regulations common to all undergraduate students including the process of Academic Performance Evaluation (consult the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar).

First-Year Seminars

B.A. degree students are strongly encouraged to include a First-Year Seminar (FYSM) during their first 4.0 credits of registration. Students are limited to 1.0 credit in FYSM and can only register in a FYSM while they have first-year standing in their B.A. program. Students who have completed the Enriched Support Program (ESP) or who are required to take a minimum of one English as a Second Language (ESLA) credit are not permitted to register in a FYSM.

Breadth Requirement

Among the credits presented at graduation, students in both the B.A. General and the B.A. Honours degrees and B.Co.M.S. are required to include 3.0 breadth credits, including 1.0 credit from each of three of the four Breadth Areas identified below. Credits that fulfil requirements in the Major, Minor, Concentration or Specialization may be used to fulfil the Breadth Requirement.

Students admitted with a completed university degree are exempt from breadth requirements.

Students in the following interdisciplinary programs are exempt from the B.A. breadth requirement.

  • African Studies
  • Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • Environmental Studies
  • Human Rights
Breadth Area 1: Culture and Communication

American Sign Language, Art History, Art and Culture, Communication and Media Studies, Comparative Literary Studies, Digital Humanities, English, Film Studies, French, Journalism, Music, and Languages (Arabic, English as a Second Language, German, Greek, Hebrew, Indigenous Languages, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish)

Subject codes: ARAB, ARTH, ASLA, CHIN, CLST, COMS, DIGH, ENGL, ESLA, FILM, FINS, FREN, GERM, GREK, HEBR, ITAL, JAPA, JOUR, LANG, LATN, MUSI, PORT, RUSS, SPAN

Breadth Area 2: Humanities

African Studies, Applied Linguistics and Discourse Studies, Canadian Studies, Child Studies, Classical Civilization, Directed Interdisciplinary Studies, Disability Studies, European and Russian Studies, History, Human Rights, Humanities, Indigenous Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Linguistics, Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Philosophy, Religion, Sexuality Studies, South Asian Studies, and Women's and Gender Studies.

Subject codes: AFRI, ALDS, CDNS, CHST, CLCV, DBST, DIST, EURR, HIST, HUMR, HUMS, INDG, LACS, LING, MEMS, PHIL, RELI, SAST, SXST, WGST

Breadth Area 3: Science, Engineering, and Design

Architecture, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Engineering, Environmental Science, Food Science and Nutrition, Health Sciences, Industrial Design, Mathematics, Neuroscience, Statistics, Physics, and Technology, Society, Environment.

Subject codes: AERO, ARCC, ARCH, ARCN, ARCS, ARCU, BIOC, BIOL, CHEM, CIVE, CMPS, COMP, ECOR, ELEC, ENSC, ENVE, ERTH, FOOD, HLTH, IDES, ISCI, ISCS, ISYS, MAAE, MATH, MECH, NEUR, NSCI, PHYS, SREE, STAT, SYSC, TSES

Breadth Area 4: Social Sciences

Anthropology, Business, Cognitive Science, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Economics, Environmental Studies, Geography, Geomatics, Global and International Studies, Global Politics, Interdisciplinary Public Affairs, International Affairs, Law, Migration and Diaspora Studies, Political Management, Political Science, Psychology, Public Administration, Public Affairs and Policy Management, Social Work, Sociology/Anthropology, Sociology

Subject codes: ANTH, BUSI, CGSC, CRCJ, ECON, ENST, GEOG, GEOM, GINS, GPOL, INAF, IPAF, LAWS, MGDS, PADM, PAPM, POLM, PSCI, PSYC, SOCI, SOWK

Declared and Undeclared Students

Students who are registered in a program within the degree are called Declared students. Most students designate a program of study when they first apply for admission and so begin their studies as Declared students. Students may also choose to begin their studies within the B.A. degree without being registered in a program. These students are referred to as Undeclared. The recommended course pattern for Undeclared students is outlined under Undeclared in the Programs section of this Calendar. Undeclared students must apply to enter a program before beginning their second year of study. The Student Academic Success Centre offers support to Undeclared students in making this decision.

Change of Program Within the B.A. Degree

Students may transfer to a program within the B.A. degree, if upon entry to the new program they would be in Good Standing . Other applications for change of program will be considered on their merits; students may be admitted to the new program in Good Standing or on Academic Warning. Students may apply to declare or change their program within the B.A. Degree at the Registrar's Office according to the published deadlines. Acceptance into a program or into a program element or option is subject to any enrollment limitations, specific program, program element or option requirements, as published in the relevant Calendar entry.

Minors, Concentrations and Specializations

Students may apply to the Registrar's Office to be admitted to a minor, concentration or specialization during their first or subsequent years of study. Acceptance into a minor, concentration or specialization is subject to any specific requirements of the intended Minor, Concentration or Specialization as published in the relevant Calendar entry. Acceptance into a Concentration or Specialization requires that the student be in Good Standing.

Mention : Français

Students registered in certain B.A. programs may earn the notation Mention : Français by completing part of their requirements in French and by demonstrating a knowledge of the history and culture of French Canada. The general requirements are listed below. For more specific details consult the departmental program entries.

Students in a B.A. Honours program must present:

  1. 1.0 credit in French language;
  2. 1.0 credit devoted to the history and culture of French Canada;
  3. 1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level and 1.0 credit at the 4000-level in the Honours discipline taken in French.

Students in a B.A. General program must present:

  1. 1.0 credit in advanced French;
  2. 1.0 credit devoted to the history and culture of French Canada;
  3. 1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level in the Major discipline taken in French.

Students in Combined Honours programs must fulfil the Mention : Français requirement in both disciplines.

Courses taught in French (Item 3, above) may be taken at Carleton, at the University of Ottawa on the Exchange Agreement, or at a francophone university on a Letter of Permission. Students planning to take courses on exchange or on a Letter of Permission should take careful note of the residence requirement for a minimum number of Carleton courses in their programs. Consult the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar for information regarding study on Exchange or Letter of Permission.

Co-operative Education

For more information about how to apply for the Co-op program and how the Co-op program works please visit the Co-op website.

All students participating in the Co-op program are governed by the Undergraduate Co-operative Education Policy.

Undergraduate Co-operative Education Policy

Admission Requirements

Students can apply to co-op in one of two ways; directly from high school or after beginning a degree program at Carleton.

If a student is admitted to co-op from high school, their grades will be reviewed two terms to one year prior to their first work term to ensure they continue to meet the academic requirements after their 1st or 2nd year of study. The time at which evaluation takes place depends on the program of study. Students will automatically be notified via their Carleton email account if they are permitted to continue.

Students not admitted to Carleton University with the co-op option on their degree can apply for admission via the co-operative education program website. To view application deadlines, visit carleton.ca/co-op.

Admission to the co-op option is based on the completion of 5.0 or more credits at Carleton University, the CGPA requirement for the students' academic program as well as any course prerequisites. The articulated CGPA for each program is the normal standard for assessment. Please see the specific degree program sections for the unique admission and continuation requirements for each academic program.

English Language Proficiency

Students admitted to Carleton based on CAEL, IELTS or TOEFL assessments and who are required to take an ESL course must take and pass the Oral Proficiency in Communicative Settings (OPECS) Test. The test must be taken before being permitted to register in COOP 1000. Admission to the co-op program can be confirmed with a minimum score of 4+.

Participation Requirements

COOP 1000

Once a student has been given admission or continuation confirmation to the co-op option s/he must complete and pass COOP 1000 (a mandatory online 0.0 credit course). Students will have access to this course a minimum of two terms prior to their first work term and will be notified when to register.

Communication with the Co-op Office

Students must maintain contact with the co-op office during their job search and while on a work term. All email communication will be conducted via the students' Carleton email account.

Employment

Although every effort is made to ensure a sufficient number of job postings for all students enrolled in the co-op option of their degree program, no guarantee of employment can be made. Carleton's co-op program operates a competitive job search process and is dependent upon current market conditions. Academic performance, skills, motivation, maturity, attitude and potential will determine whether a student is offered a job. It is the student's responsibility to actively conduct a  job search in addition to participation in the job search process operated by the co-op office. Once a student accepts a co-op job offer (verbally or written), his/her job search will end and access to co-op jobs will be removed for that term. Students that do not successfully obtain a co-op work term are expected to continue with their academic studies. The summer term is the exception to this rule. Students should also note that hiring priority is given to Canadian citizens for co-op positions in the Federal Government of Canada.

Registering in Co-op Courses

Students will be registered in a Co-op Work Term course while at work. The number of Co-op Work Term courses that a student is registered in is dependent upon the number of four-month work terms that a student accepts.

While on a co-op work term students may take a maximum of 0.5 credit throughout each four-month co-op work term. Courses must be scheduled outside of regular working hours.

Students must be registered as full-time before they begin their co-op job search (2.0 credits). All co-op work terms must be completed before the beginning of the final academic term. Students may not finish their degree on a co-op work term.

Work Term Assessment and Evaluation

To obtain a Satisfactory grade for the co-op work term students must have:

  1. A satisfactory work term evaluation by the co-op employer;
  2. A satisfactory grade on the work term report.

Students must submit a work term report at the completion of each four-month work term. Reports are due on the 16th of April, August, and December and students are notified of due dates through their Carleton email account.

Workplace performance will be assessed by the workplace supervisor. Should a student receive an unsatisfactory rating from their co-op employer, an investigation by the co-op program manager will be undertaken. An unsatisfactory employer evaluation does not preclude a student from achieving an overall satisfactory rating for the work term.

Graduation with the Co-op Designation

In order to graduate with the co-op designation, students must satisfy all requirements for their degree program in addition to the requirements according to each co-op program (i.e. successful completion of three or four work terms).

Note: Participation in the co-op option will add up to one additional year for a student to complete their degree program.

Voluntary Withdrawal from the Co-op Option

Students may withdraw from the co-op option of their degree program during a study term ONLY. Students at work may not withdraw from the work term or the co-op option until s/he has completed the requirements of the work term.

Students are eligible to continue in their regular academic program provided that they meet the academic standards required for continuation.

Involuntary or Required Withdrawal from the Co-op Option

Students may be required to withdraw from the co-op option of their degree program for one or any of the following reasons:

  1. Failure to achieve a grade of SAT in COOP 1000
  2. Failure to pay all co-op related fees
  3. Failure to actively participate in the job search process
  4. Failure to attend all interviews for positions to which the student has applied
  5. Declining more than one job offer during the job search process
  6. Continuing a job search after accepting a co-op position
  7. Dismissal from a work term by the co-op employer
  8. Leaving a work term without approval by the Co-op manager
  9. Receipt of an unsatisfactory work term evaluation
  10. Submission of an unsatisfactory work term report

Standing and Appeals

The Co-op and Career Services office administers the regulations and procedures that are applicable to all co-op program options. All instances of a student's failure during a work term or other issues directly related to their participation in the co-op option will be reported to the academic department.

Any decision made by the Co-op and Career Services office can be appealed via the normal appeal process within the University.

International Students

All International Students are required to possess a Co-op Work Permit issued by Citizenship and Immigration Canada before they can begin working. It is illegal to work in Canada without the proper authorization. Students will be provided with a letter of support to accompany their application. Students must submit their application for their permit before being permitted to view and apply for jobs on the Co-op Services database. Confirmation of a position will not be approved until a student can confirm they have received their permit. Students are advised to discuss the application process and requirements with the International Student Services Office.

B.A. Honours Sociology: Co-op Admission and Continuation Requirements

  • Maintain full-time status in each study term (2.0 credits);
  • Be eligible to work in Canada (for off-campus work)
  • Have successfully completed COOP 1000 [0.0]

In addition to the following:

  1. Registered in the B.A. Honours Sociology program;
  2. Have a minimum overall CGPA of 7.0 and major CGPA of 8.0 in the first two years of academic study;
  3. Successfully completed, by the start-date of the first work term, the required first-year courses, second-year courses, SOCI 2000 and SOCI 2001 or SOCI 3000

Students in B.A. Honours Sociology must successfully complete three (3) work terms to obtain the Co-op designation.

Co-op Work Term CourseSOCI 3999
Work/Study Pattern:

Year 1Year 2Year 3Year 4Year 5
TermPatternTermPatternTermPatternTermPatternTermPattern
FallSFallSFallSFallW/SFallW/S
WinterSWinterSWinterSWinterW/SWinterS
Summer Summer SummerWSummerW

Legend
S
: Study
W: Work
O: Optional
* indicates recommended work study pattern
** student finds own employer for this work-term.

Admissions Information

Admission Requirements are for the 2017-2018 year only, and are based on the Ontario High School System. Holding the minimum admission requirements only establishes eligibility for consideration. The cut-off averages for admission may be considerably higher than the minimum. See also the General Admission and Procedures section of this Calendar. An overall average of at least 70% is normally required to be considered for admission. Some programs may also require specific course prerequisites and prerequisite averages and/or supplementary admission portfolios. Higher averages are required for admission to programs for which the demand for places by qualified applicants exceeds the number of places available. The overall average required for admission is determined each year on a program by program basis. Consult admissions.carleton.ca for further details.

Admission Requirements

Degrees

  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)(Honours)
  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)(General)

First Year

For B.A. (General) and B.A. (Honours)
The Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent including a minimum of six 4U or M courses. The six 4U or M courses must include a 4U course in English (or anglais ). For applicants whose first language is not English, the requirement of English can also be met under the conditions outlined in the section “English Language Requirements” in the Admissions Requirements and Procedures section of this Calendar.

The cut-off average for admission will be set annually and will normally be above the minimum requirement. Applicants falling slightly below the cut-off average will be considered on an individual basis to determine whether there are special circumstances that would permit their admission. Students who feel that their high school grade average does not reflect their potential may apply to the Enriched Support Program (see the Enriched Support Program section of this Calendar).

Articulation Agreements

For B.A. (Carleton)/Police Foundations (Algonquin)
To be eligible for admission pursuant to this Articulation Agreement, students must have completed the Diploma in Police Foundations at Algonquin College with an overall B average (CGPA of 3.0). They will then be considered for admission to a B.A. program at Carleton in one of Criminology, Law, Psychology, or Sociology.

Advanced Standing

B.A. (General and Honours) Program

Applications for admission to the second or subsequent years will be assessed on their merits. Advanced standing will be granted only for those courses that are determined to be appropriate.

Articulation Agreements

B.A. (Carleton)/Police Foundations (Algonquin)
Students who have obtained a Diploma in Police Foundations from Algonquin College with an overall average of B or higher will be granted up to a maximum of 5.0 credits on admission towards the completion of a B.A. in either Criminology, Law, Psychology, or Sociology.

Direct Admission to the First Year of the Co-op Option

Anthropology and Sociology, Communication and Media Studies, English, European and Russian Studies, French, History, Law, Political Science, Psychology

Applicants must:

  1. meet the required overall admission cut-off average and prerequisite course average. These averages may be higher than the stated minimum requirements;
  2. be registered as a full-time student in the Bachelor of Arts Honours with one of the majors listed above;
  3. be eligible to work in Canada (for off-campus work placements).

Meeting the above requirements only establishes eligibility for admission to the program. The prevailing job market may limit enrolment in the co-op option. Students should also note that hiring priority is given to Canadian citizens for co-op positions in the Public Service Commission.

Note: continuation requirements for students previously admitted to the co-op option and admission requirements for the co-op option after beginning the program are described in the Co-operative Education Regulations section of this Calendar.