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Department of Law
Loeb Building C473
613-520-3690
http://carleton.ca/law

Program Requirements

Graduate Diploma in Conflict Resolution (3.5 credits)

Requirements:
1. 1.5 credits in:1.5
LAWS 5700 [0.5]
Theories of Conflict Resolution
LAWS 5701 [0.5]
Introduction to Conflict Resolution and Mediation
LAWS 5702 [0.5]
Advanced Conflict Resolution and Mediation
2. 0.5 credit from:0.5
LAWS 5708 [0.5]
Applied Research Project
LAWS 5709 [0.5]
Skills Assessment
3. 1.5 credit from:1.5
LAWS 5703 [0.5]
Organizational Conflict and System Design
LAWS 5704 [0.5]
Multi-Party, Multi-Issue Conflict Resolution and Consensus Building
LAWS 5705 [0.5]
Mediation in Family Matters
LAWS 5706 [0.5]
Special Topics in Conflict Resolution
Total Credits3.5

Law (LAWS) Courses

Note: some graduate courses may also be open to interested fourth-year students with permission of the Department.

LAWS 5000 [0.5 credit]
Theories of Law and Social Transformation

Examines three groups of theories of law (liberal, sociological and Marxist) focusing on different ways law is conceived as an object of inquiry and on different accounts of trajectories of legal development. Potential of law for realizing or inhibiting social change provides analytic framework.

LAWS 5001 [0.5 credit]
Legal Method and Social Inquiry

Introduces problems of research strategy and methods. Explores contrasting methodologies in legal research; evaluates methodologies employed in understanding legal reasoning, discourses, and practices. Includes seminars in which participants present outlines of their own research projects, focusing on methodologies and research questions.

LAWS 5002 [0.5 credit]
Law and Gender Relations

Examines theoretical approaches informed by significance of gender to structure and operation of law. Concepts such as essentialism, difference, cultural determination, and social construction of gender relations examined in context of contemporary feminist debates. Focus on understanding and facility with feminist analysis and methodology.

LAWS 5003 [0.5 credit]
Law, Economy and Society

Addresses the relationship between law, economy, and society. Competing theoretical accounts of the relationship between legal regulation and social and economic change explored through selected historical and contemporary case studies.

LAWS 5004 [0.5 credit]
Law, Crime and Social Order

Examines issues of crime control and state security through topical, in-depth investigations into contemporary problems. Focus is on critically analyzing the criminal justice system, and crime control strategies, as order maintenance /social control.

LAWS 5005 [0.5 credit]
Law, State and Politics

Examines theoretical explanations of relationships between law, state and politics, Selected areas such as rights theory, rule of law, separation of powers or judicial review may provide focus.

LAWS 5006 [0.5 credit]
Historical Perspectives on Law and Society

Examines historical relationship between social forces, law and legal institutions and utility of historical forms of knowledge and methods to legal studies. Surveys selected issues in private, public and criminal law.

LAWS 5007 [0.5 credit]
Race, Ethnicity and the Law

Examines ways race and racism interact with gender and class in shaping legal system. Explores ways legal system institutionalizes racism and potential for using the legal system to combat racism. Selected areas such as immigration law and native rights may be used to illustrate themes.

LAWS 5008 [0.5 credit]
Consuming Passions: The Regulation of Consumption, Appearance and Sexuality

Examines rise of consumption and private pleasures and their regulation and self-regulation. Social history of regulation of two fields of consumption: surfaces of the person: personal appearance, in particular of dress, the body, sexuality; and intakes of the body, focusing on food, alcohol, drugs.
Also listed as SOCI 5204.

LAWS 5100 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Problems in Legal Philosophy

Studies in legal theory and analyses of law advanced by Hart, Dworkin, and others, and legal concepts: for example, principles, rights, duties, liability, etc. Precise course content will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of the term.
Also listed as PHIL 5100.
Prerequisite(s): either LAWS 3105 or LAWS 3101 (PHIL 3101) and LAWS 3102 (PHIL 3102), or permission of the Department.

LAWS 5200 [0.5 credit]
International Economic Law: Regulation of Trade and Investment

Study of regulation of international economic activity. Discussion of relevant international institutions, legal aspects of integration, governmental regulation of trade and investment.
Also listed as INAF 5507.
Prerequisite(s): Open only to students in their master's year who have not studied international economic law.

LAWS 5302 [0.5 credit]
Feminism, Law and Social Transformation

Drawing on contemporary cases and/or historical contexts to explore limits and impact of feminist legal engagement. Race, class, disability, sexuality and other social categories and changing feminist conceptions of law and sites of legal relations, politics and activism: the meaning of social transformation.


LAWS 5305 [0.5 credit]
Crime, Social Change and Criminal Law Reform

Political, practical and ideological dimensions of criminal law reform and activism undertaken by individuals, groups and the state to achieve social transformation. Reform initiatives are considered in relation to their effects on race, class, gender, sexuality, disability and other sites of difference and discrimination.


LAWS 5306 [0.5 credit]
Police and Capital

The idea of `police' as a general historical project aimed at the fabrication of social order and the development of liberal philosophy, political economy and security. Contemporary public and private security provision considered in light of commodification, class conflict, and risk thinking.
Also listed as SOCI 5305.

LAWS 5500 [0.5 credit]
The Canadian Constitution

Familiarizes students with terminology, principles, and doctrines of judicial interpretation of Constitution Acts 1867-1982 and other constitutional statutes. Emphasis on division of legislative powers in the Canadian federation.
Prerequisite(s): open only to graduate students in their master's year who have not previously studied Canadian constitutional law.

LAWS 5603 [0.5 credit]
International Law: Theory and Practice

Legal principles governing international relations; emphasis on different theoretical, historical and political perspectives, such as Natural Law, Positivism, Critical Legal Studies, TWAIL, Feminism, Marxism. Specific case studies or topics are examined to critically interrogate the foundations and practices of international law.
Also listed as INAF 5505.


LAWS 5662 [0.5 credit]
Law, Regulation and Governance

Historical and contemporary roles of law and regulation in processes, practices and discourses of governance. Law and state; domestic and global governance; diversity of law-governance relationships; law as a constituent force, enforcement mechanism and a distinctive product of governance.
Also offered, with different requirements as appropriate, as LAWS 6002, for which additional credit is precluded.

LAWS 5663 [0.5 credit]
Human Rights, Citizenship and Global Justice

The implications of law in selected issues involving human rights, citizenship and global justice. Topics may include justification and legitimation of human rights, contemporary citizenship, struggles for global justice, recognition and democracy, and post-nationalism and global economic regulation.
Also offered with different requirements where appropriate, as LAWS 6003, for which additional credit is precluded.

LAWS 5664 [0.5 credit]
Crime, Law and Security

Contemporary debates around crime, criminal justice and security as mediated through law. The interrelationship between the politics, process and reform of criminal justice in a socio-legal context.
Also offered as LAWS 6004, with different requirements where appropriate, for which additional credit is precluded.

LAWS 5700 [0.5 credit]
Theories of Conflict Resolution

An introduction to the field of conflict studies, negotiation and mediation theory including: analyzing and resolving conflict, negotiation styles, orientations and models of mediation, alternative dispute resolution, building consensus, current issues and trends in the field of conflict studies.

LAWS 5701 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Conflict Resolution and Mediation

Introduction to the practice of negotiation and mediation including: contextualizing conflict resolution, understanding how to negotiate and mediate, determining the role of the negotiator/ mediator, reviewing the current state of mediation and conflict resolution, and understanding the importance of a theory-informed practice.

LAWS 5702 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Conflict Resolution and Mediation

Building upon the theory and skills of conflict resolution and mediation introduced in LAWS 5701. Students will learn to convene a mediation, analyze the level of conflict, design a conflict resolution process, co-mediate, and facilitate a multi-party problem solving session.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 5701.

LAWS 5703 [0.5 credit]
Organizational Conflict and System Design

Students will learn to apply conceptual frameworks to the diagnosis and assessment of organizational conflict, develop and implement appropriate intervention programs and strategies, and design conflict management systems for organizations.

LAWS 5704 [0.5 credit]
Multi-Party, Multi-Issue Conflict Resolution and Consensus Building

Using case studies where mediators have successfully assisted competing interest groups in finding mutual-gains resolutions to conflicts, students will expand upon their personal skills of crisis intervention, group facilitation, assisted negotiation, dispute resolution process design and coaching.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 5701 and LAWS 5702 or equivalent.

LAWS 5705 [0.5 credit]
Mediation in Family Matters

Students will examine family dynamics and family conflict and explore conflict within intact families as well as conflict that arises when parties separate. The practical aspects of mediation such as ethics, professional standards and screening, as well as intake and outcome documents will be discussed.

LAWS 5706 [0.5 credit]
Special Topics in Conflict Resolution

This research seminar will explore a selected topic from current debates in conflict resolution and conflict management.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 5700.

LAWS 5708 [0.5 credit]
Applied Research Project

Independent research in the theory and practice of conflict analysis, prevention or intervention, including system design, process intervention, and evaluation. The project must represent the candidate’s independent study after being admitted to the program. Previous work may be used only as introductory or background material.

LAWS 5709 [0.5 credit]
Skills Assessment

Assessors evaluate a student’s readiness to mediate disputes through a simulated mediation. Must be completed within one year after completion of course work. Option for the final requirement of the Graduate Diploma in Conflict Resolution.
Prerequisite(s): completion of five Graduate Diploma in Conflict Resolution courses.

LAWS 5900 [0.5 credit]
Tutorials/Directed Readings in Law

Tutorials or reading courses on selected topics may be arranged with the permission of the supervisor of graduate studies and the approval of the supervising faculty member.

LAWS 5901 [0.5 credit]
Tutorial/Directed Readings in Law

Tutorials or reading courses on selected topics may be arranged with the permission of the supervisor of graduate studies and the approval of the supervising faculty member.

LAWS 5903 [0.5 credit]
Contemporary Topics in Legal Studies

A research seminar which explores a selected topic from current debates in legal studies. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.

LAWS 5904 [0.5 credit]
Contemporary Topics in Legal Studies

A research seminar which explores a selected topic from current debates in legal studies.

LAWS 5908 [1.0 credit]
M.A. Research Essay


LAWS 5909 [2.0 credits]
M.A. Thesis


LAWS 6000 [0.5 credit]
Doctoral Seminar in Legal Studies

Analysis of the major themes, approaches and literature in contemporary legal and social theory.

LAWS 6001 [0.5 credit]
Proseminar in Legal Studies

A seminar which meets every two weeks throughout the academic year. Based on presentations of papers and works in progress by faculty, students and invited guests, as well as assigned readings on issues that deal with current research in legal studies.

LAWS 6002 [0.5 credit]
Law, Regulation and Governance

Historical and contemporary roles of law and regulation in processes, practices and discourses of governance. Law and state; domestic and global governance; diversity of law-governance relationships; law as a constituent force, enforcement mechanism and a distinctive product of governance.
Also offered as LAWS 5662, with different requirements where appropriate, for which additional credit is precluded.

LAWS 6003 [0.5 credit]
Human Rights, Citizenship and Global Justice

The implications of law in selected issues involving human rights, citizenship and global justice. Topics may include justification and legitimation of human rights, contemporary citizenship, struggles for global justice, recognition and democracy, and post-nationalism and global economic regulation.
Also offered as LAWS 5663, with different requirements where appropriate, for which additional credit is precluded.

LAWS 6004 [0.5 credit]
Crime, Law, and Security

Contemporary debates around crime, criminal justice and security as mediated through law. The interrelationship between the politics, process and reform of criminal justice in a socio-legal context.
Also offered as LAWS 5664, with different requirements where appropriate, for which additional credit is precluded.

LAWS 6010 [0.5 credit]
Directed Readings in Legal Studies

Advanced directed readings in selected areas of legal studies, involving presentation of papers as the basis for discussion with the course instructor.


LAWS 6095 [1.0 credit]
Field Comprehensive

The field comprehensive examination will focus on the relevant theoretical and/or methodological issues related to the field of study. The examination can take a variety of forms and will be decided by the supervisory committee in consultation with the student. The form of the exam will be in accordance with departmental policy.

LAWS 6096 [1.0 credit]
Thesis Proposal

The thesis proposal must be written after the completion of the other course requirements, and normally will be completed by the end of the second year of doctoral study. The proposal is defended at an oral examination conducted by the supervisory committee. Evaluation is on the basis of SAT/UNS.

LAWS 6909 [5.5 credits]
Ph. D. Thesis


Summer session: some of the courses listed in this Calendar are offered during the summer. Hours and scheduling for summer session courses will differ significantly from those reported in the fall/winter Calendar. To determine the scheduling and hours for summer session classes, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Not all courses listed are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for the current session and to determine the term of offering, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Regulations

See the General Regulations section of this Calendar.

All students are required to obtain a grade of B- or higher in each course in the program.

Admission

Applicants must have a bachelor's degree (or equivalent). Normally, an average of B+ or higher is required for admission.

Proficiency in English is necessary to pursue graduate studies at Carleton University. All applicants whose first language is not English must satisfy this requirement as per the General Regulations.

Note: students in the diploma programs are not eligible to receive university funding.