Print and PDF Options

2.1  Registration

2.1.1 Permission to Register

To be eligible to register for an academic term, students must meet the following requirements:

  1. Students new to Carleton must be formally admitted to a  program OR Special student studies;
  2. Returning students must be academically eligible to continue in their programs;
  3. There must be no outstanding fees on the student account with the University;
  4. The student must not have been suspended from the university for disciplinary reasons;
  5. International students must be enrolled in or have received permission for exemption from the University Health Insurance Plan (UHIP).

Registration information for the fall and winter terms is emailed to newly admitted and returning students by May 1 (carleton.ca/registration). Information regarding summer term is available from the Registrar's Office by February 1 (carleton.ca/summer).

2.1.2 Full- and Part-time Study

When responding to a legitimate request from an external agency that has not supplied its own definition, the following definitions are used:

  1. A full-time undergraduate student is one who is registered in at least 1.5 credits per academic term.
  2. A full course load is the normal maximum course load as defined by the student's program and is evaluated term by term.

2.1.3 Course Selection and Registration

Course selection must be completed according to the requirements of the faculty or school and major department(s) in which the student is registering. Students should seek the advice of their program adviser, academic unit, or the Academic Advising Centre.

Students planning to undertake professional training beyond their undergraduate studies should ensure that their undergraduate programs meet the requirements for admission to, or registration in, their intended post-graduate program.

Students are not permitted to register in course timetable conflicts.

All course selection and course change activity within the published deadlines (adds, drops, change of section) is completed using Carleton Central at central.carleton.ca. These activities are limited by deadlines set out in the Academic Year section of this Calendar. It is the student's responsibility to understand and meet these deadlines.

2.1.4 Course Load

In most undergraduate programs, the normal course load is the equivalent of 2.5 credits in each of the fall and winter terms and the equivalent of 1.0 credit in each of the early and late periods of the summer term. In some programs, higher course loads may apply.  Full-session courses are considered to have their credit weight evenly distributed over the terms. For example, a two-term 1.0 credit course is considered to contribute 0.5 credit to course load in each term.

A student is registered in a course overload if the student is registered in more credit equivalents per term than the normal load for their program. Students with an Overall CGPA of 7.00 who have completed a minimum of 4.0 credits at Carleton may choose to register in a course overload, to a maximum of 0.5 credit above the normal course load for their program in each of the fall and winter terms and in either the early or late period of the summer term. Students requiring permission for course overloads should contact the Registrar's Office.

2.1.5 Payment of Fees

A student is responsible for all tuition and other fees resulting from registration in any and all courses. The student remains responsible for paying this debt whether or not the student attends or participates in the class or classes unless they withdraw within the published deadline set out in the Academic Year section of this calendar. Student Accounts may be viewed through Carleton Central and are the administrative responsibility of the Business Office.

For fee payment policies and deadlines, please visit the Student Accounts website.

2.1.6 Withdrawal

Students are responsible for formally withdrawing from a course or courses within the published deadlines. Ceasing to attend classes, or informing an instructor of intent to withdraw, does not constitute withdrawal. Withdrawal is completed by using Carleton Central at central.carleton.ca. The official date of withdrawal from the course(s) is the date on which the student successfully completes the necessary withdrawal action.

Students must withdraw from a course or courses on or before the appropriate last date for withdrawal as indicated in the Academic Year section of this Calendar. Withdrawal is not permitted after the published deadlines (noted in the Academic Year section of the Calendar each term). Students who withdraw after the full fee adjustment date in each term and by the academic withdrawal deadline will receive the grading notation of WDN on their transcript for the course(s) from which they withdraw.  Please consult section 5.4 Grading System of this Calendar for more information.

Withdrawal activity may affect academic standing as prescribed by regulations governing the program, as well as status with the University (full-time or part-time). Consult the Registrar's Office for information and guidance. A student who withdraws from a course retains no academic credit for any part of that course. Withdrawing from a course may have serious consequences for scholarships, OSAP and other student financial support programs. Students are advised to consult the Awards Office for guidance.

Fee adjustments for students who are withdrawing from a course, or courses, will be calculated as of the date of successful completion of withdrawal via Carleton Central.

2.1.7 Deregistration

After due process, the University may deregister a student under the following circumstances:

  1. if it is determined that the student does not meet all of the requirements for permission to register as set out in 2.1.1 above;
  2. if it is determined that an applicant for admission has, in the process, provided false or incomplete information;
  3. if the student does not have - or, when requested, present proof of - the course prerequisite(s);
  4. if the student is registered in a course timetable conflict;
  5. if it is determined that the student has not met the additional admission requirements, including satisfying the English language proficiency requirements of the University;
  6. if it is determined that the student has not met the requirements of a conditional offer of admission;
  7. if the student is not properly registered in the two terms of a full-session course.

2.1.8 Auditing Student

An auditing student is defined as a student who attends a course for interest and not for credit. Auditing students may typically only enrol in lecture or seminar courses. Formal registration is required but the student does not receive academic credit for the course. Permission to audit a course is required from the instructor and students may be required to satisfy all registration requirements. Permission will also be subject to capacity, and generally will not be provided until after courses commence. The student may attend classes but will not receive formal evaluation and/or grading on any submitted material. The student should discuss with the instructor the conditions and expectations under which an auditing student may be permitted to participate, including attendance and participation in class discussion and group work, and the submission of any material.

A request to change course registration from audit to credit status, or credit to audit, must be received by the Registrar’s Office no later than the last day to add a course (of that duration) in the term. Students must satisfy all registration requirements to register in the course for academic credit. Students may not retroactively appeal to change the registration status from audit to credit, but may subsequently re-register in the course for credit. Graduate students are limited to a maximum of 1.0 course-weight audit registration per program.

2.1.9 Credit for Closely-related Courses

The University recognizes three distinct close relationships between courses.

Courses preclude credit for each other if they contain sufficient content in common that credit may not be earned for more than one of the courses. Should two or more courses be taken that preclude each other, only the most recent attempt will be available for program credit; the remaining earlier attempt(s) will be forfeited. Courses that preclude each other are not necessarily considered equivalent and may or may not be interchangeable in fulfilling degree requirements.

Courses are equivalent if the appropriate academic unit(s) consider the content of the courses to be sufficiently similar that either course may be used to fulfil a program requirement. Courses designated as equivalent to each other cannot both count for credit: credit is retained only for the most recent attempt. Examples of equivalent courses arise frequently in advanced standing and when new curriculum is introduced.

Two courses are cross-listed if they are the same course listed under two different subject codes, usually by two different academic units.

In all cases, credit will be given for only one of the courses in any equivalent, precluded or cross-listed pair. Students planning to enrol in such courses are advised to consult with their academic adviser in advance of registration to ensure that the course number under which they will be enrolling is appropriate to their program. Changes to resolve incorrect course selection due to equivalence, preclusion or cross-listing may not be made after the last day for course changes in the term (see the Academic Year section of this Calendar).

2.1.10 Two-term Courses

Certain courses may be taught over two academic terms. Students are registered in the same section of the course, and any linked components, in both terms. Changes cannot be made after the last day for course changes. These courses will be clearly identified in the registration information. The most common example is a 1.0-credit course taught over the fall and winter terms.

In place of a grade, the first term course will be assigned the notation CTN . The second term course will be assigned the final grade for the entire course. Credit will be given only for the complete course taught over two consecutive terms in corresponding sections. No partial credit will be given for part of the course.

2.1.11 Challenge for Credit

Challenge for credit is a Carleton University policy that enables students to gain undergraduate academic credit for their own learning and experience through work and related professional experience. It is not intended to overlap in scope with transfer of credits or admission with advanced standing.

This policy gives the student the opportunity to be examined on, and receive credit for, a recognized Carleton course without meeting the normal requirements of registration, attendance, and instruction. Students wishing to challenge for credit should inquire at the Registrar's Office and provide documentation to support the challenge. If the academic department is satisfied that the student has adequate experience and learning related to the course in question, it sets an appropriate examination. If the student is successful in the examination, the course is credited to his or her academic record.

Not all courses offered at the university are open to challenge for credit. Students must register in the course with the status of challenge and fees apply. Students seeking more information should contact the Registrar's Office.

Challenge for credit is available only to students formally admitted to and registered in a program leading to a degree, diploma or certificate. Special students are not eligible to apply for challenge for credit. Students may challenge for credit in a course only if they are in good standing academically. A student may not challenge for credit more than once in the same course. Students who challenge for credit are not permitted access to the course materials available to registered students.

A successful challenge for credit is denoted on the student's record by the notation CH. An unsuccessful challenge attempt is denoted by UCH. These notations have no impact on the CGPA calculation. Credits obtained by challenge may not be used to satisfy the residency requirement for the student's degree program or major discipline (see Section 2.2.2 or 3.4.1).

2.2  Credit Requirements and Limitations

2.2.1 Maximum Credits Below the 2000 Level

A student may count a maximum of 7.0 credits below the 2000 level toward fulfilment of graduation requirements.

Credits in excess of this limit will be set aside as Extra to the Degree (ETD), No Credit for the Degree (NCD) or Forfeit. This allows students to increase their CGPA by pushing out low grades below the 2000 level through replacement by higher grades at the same level.

2.2.2/3.4.1 Minimum Number of Residency Credits

To be eligible for graduation with a Carleton degree, certificate or diploma, each student must present a certain number of credits earned at Carleton University which have not been presented to fulfil any degree that has been previously awarded, including a degree or degrees at Carleton University. These are referred to as residency credits. Courses taken under the University of Ottawa Exchange Agreement do not count as residency credits.

All degree students must present a minimum of 5.0 residency credits at graduation, with the following exceptions:

The minimum number of residency credits for students in the Dual Degree, B.Eng., B.I.D, B.I.T. and B.A.S. Design program is half of the total number of credits required for the program. The residency requirement for B.A.S. students not in Design is the standard minimum of 5.0 residency credits at graduation.

To obtain a minor, a student must present at least 2.0 residency credits counting toward that minor.

To obtain an undergraduate certificate from Carleton University, students must present residency credits including a minimum of 4.0 credits taken at Carleton. The residency for certificates taken concurrently with a Carleton degree may be satisfied with credits used also to satisfy the degree residency requirement.

To obtain a post-baccalaureate diploma from Carleton University, students must present residency credits including a minimum of 3.0 credits taken at Carleton.

2.2.3/3.4.2 Advanced Credits

The credits presented at graduation that are credits completed at Carleton after admission, credits completed at Carleton within the last ten years for which advanced standing has been granted and credits completed as part of the University of Ottawa Exchange or another formal domestic or international Exchange, must include:

  1. For Honours degrees, at least 3.0 credits in the major and at the 3000 level or above;
  2. For Combined Honours degrees, at least 1.5 credits in each major and at the 3000 level or above;
  3. For Major degrees, at least 3.0 credits in the major and at the 2000 level or above;
  4. For General degrees, at least 3.0 credits at the 2000-level or above and, if applicable, in the major.

2.2.4 Transfer of Credit Prior to Admission

When a student is considered for admission, credit may be granted for individual courses successfully completed at other recognized post-secondary institutions, if:

  1. the individual courses are relevant to a student's proposed program; and,
  2. the appropriate academic department recommends such action.

Each application is evaluated on its own merits.

2.2.5 Transfer of Credit Subsequent to Admission

Letter of Permission

Students who have been formally admitted to a degree, certificate or diploma program may apply to take courses at other recognized post-secondary institutions on Letters of Permission and have the credits transferred to their Carleton programs. The following conditions must be met:

  1. the student must have successfully completed at least 3.0 credits or have met the required program residency requirements at Carleton University;
  2. the student must present the minimum CGPA requirements for graduation in their credential;
  3. the student must obtain formal approval from the Registrar’s Office prior to commencing each course.

Grades for successfully completed courses taken on Letters of Permission are transferred back to Carleton University as SAT (Satisfactory) and are not included in CGPA calculations. A course taken on Letter of Permission and failed is recorded with the grade UNS (Unsatisfactory).  Failures are not included in CGPA calculations but they are counted as a discredit. A higher level of performance may be required in a course that would have contributed to any programmatic CGPA had the grade been transferred.  Courses taken with a passing grade below the minimum grade required will be counted as discredit.

University of Ottawa Exchange Agreement

Degree Students may register to take courses at the University of Ottawa to be credited to their Carleton University degree. The following regulations apply:

  1. Students must be registered in a degree program and must be in Good Standing. In the case of first-year studies, a maximum of two half-credit courses may be taken at the University of Ottawa that year.
  2. Only courses to be credited as part of the current degree requirements at Carleton may be taken under the terms of the exchange.
  3. The cumulative total number of credits taken at Carleton and counting towards the degree must be greater than the total number of credits taken and/or proposed to be taken at the University of Ottawa.
  4. Courses taken on the Exchange Agreement shall not count as courses taken at Carleton under residency requirements.
  5. Grades for courses taken on the Exchange Agreement will be reported on the Carleton transcript and will be included in the calculation of the CGPAs.
  6. Approval by Carleton University does not guarantee registration at the University of Ottawa.

Students withdrawing from University of Ottawa exchange agreement courses must notify the University of Ottawa by the appropriate deadlines, or a failing grade of F may be recorded.

International Exchange Agreements

Undergraduate students may be eligible to take advantage of other exchange agreements with universities throughout the world. Unless otherwise specified in a specific exchange agreement or Senate-approved program regulation, the minimum academic requirement is second-year standing or higher, and a minimum overall CGPA of 7.0. For details on these exchanges, students should consult the International Student Services Office at least one year in advance of the proposed exchange. Grades for successfully completed courses taken on International Exchange will not be transferred. Successfully completed courses will be recorded as SAT (Satisfactory) and unsuccessfully completed courses will be recorded as UNS (Unsatisfactory) and will be counted as a discredit.  A higher level of performance may be required in a course that would have contributed to any programmatic CGPA had the grade been transferred. Such a course with a passing grade below the minimum required will not count towards the degree, but will be counted as a discredit.

Dual Degree Agreement 

Undergraduate students who have been formally admitted to a degree may be eligible to complete concurrent degrees from Carleton University and a partner institution under the Dual Degree Policy and program-specific articulation agreement provided the following regulations are met:

  1. the student must be registered in a degree program and must be in Good Standing;
  2. only courses to be credited as part of the current degree requirements at Carleton may be taken under the terms of the agreement;
  3. courses taken under this agreement shall count as courses taken at Carleton under residency and advanced residency requirements (see 2.2.2/3.4.1 Minimum Number of Residency Credits and 2.2.3/3.4.2 Advanced Credits for more information);
  4. grades for courses taken under this agreement will be reported on the Carleton transcript and will be included in the calculation of the CGPAs;
  5. for details on the application process, students should consult with the appropriate Academic Department and the Registrar’s Office.

2.2.6 Credit for ESL Courses

A student in a degree program may receive credit for previously completed English as a Second Language courses from the sequence ESLA 1300, ESLA 1500, ESLA 1900, ESLA 1905, with the following restrictions:

  1. for students in degrees offered by the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences or the Faculty of Public Affairs, up to 2.0 credits will be counted toward the degree;
  2. for students in degrees offered by the Sprott School of Business, credit will be allowed only for ESLA 1900 (or ESLA 1905);
  3. for students in degrees offered by the Faculty of Science, credit will be allowed only for ESLA 1900 (or ESLA 1905);
  4. for students in the Bachelor of Engineering degree, no credits from this sequence will be counted toward the degree;
  5. for students in the Bachelor of Industrial Design degree or the Bachelor of Architectural Studies degree, credit will be allowed only for ESLA 1900 (or ESLA 1905).

2.3  Student Records

2.3.1 Electronic Communication

The University provides each student with an email address and uses this as an official channel of communication with the student. A message sent to a student's University-provided email address constitutes an official communication with the student. Students are responsible for monitoring their University email address on a regular basis for as long as they are active in the academic affairs of the University. Requests from students regarding academic or administrative issues must be sent from the student's University-provided email address.

2.3.2 Student Record Information: Names and Addresses

Names

As the University is committed to the integrity of its student records, students are required to provide their complete, legal name on applications for admission or on personal data forms required for registration. Any requests to change a name, by means of alteration, deletion, substitution or addition, must be accompanied by appropriate supporting documentation. Upon making application for graduation, students may be asked to provide proof of their legal name.

Addresses

Students are responsible for keeping their address and phone number information current. Students are required to maintain and update their address and phone number information through Carleton Central. Incorrect address information may delay the receipt of important academic information.

2.3.3 Records Retention Policy

The University's records retention policy provides for the destruction of physical student file folders and their contents after five years have elapsed since the last registration. Carleton University student academic history information is retained electronically in perpetuity. This policy applies to all students who are formally admitted and registered at the University. Students who go through the admissions process but do not accept an offer of admission will have their files destroyed at the end of the admissions cycle. Further information on the policy can be obtained by contacting the Registrar's Office.

2.3.4 Disclosure of Information

Carleton University is required to disclose personal information such as Ontario Education Numbers, student characteristics and educational outcomes to the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities under s. 15 of the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities Act, R.S.O. 1990, Chapter M. 19, as amended. The ministry collects this data for purposes such as planning, allocating and administering public funding to colleges, universities and other post-secondary educational and training institutions and to conduct research and analysis, including longitudinal studies, and statistical activities conducted by or on behalf of the ministry for purposes that relate to post-secondary education and training. Further information on how the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities uses this personal information is available on the ministry’s website.

Further information on the collection and use of student-level enrolment-related data can be obtained from the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities website: ontario.ca/page/ministry-training-colleges-universities.

In accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA), all personal and academic information is considered confidential and will not be disclosed to a third party without the authorization of the person to whom the information pertains. In addition, the University will disclose at the time of collection of personal information the purpose for which that information will be used. For further information, see carleton.ca/privacy/policies

2.3.5  Use of Student Work in Program Assessment

All academic programs at Carleton University are reviewed cyclically under the mandate of the Ontario Universities Council on Quality Assurance.  Several programs at Carleton University are also accredited by professional bodies and must undergo review for continuing accreditation.  
 
Student records and student work such as portfolios, exams, assignments, and theses may be used in the review and evaluation of academic programs.  Appropriate steps will be taken to ensure that information and material used in the evaluation of a program is kept confidential and that the processes comply with applicable privacy regulations.  These reviews may involve bodies external to the University, for example, in complying with reviews required by the government or professional accreditation bodies.