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Department of Law
Loeb Building C473
613-520-3690
http://carleton.ca/law

This section presents the requirements for programs in:

Program Requirements

In consultation with the supervisor of graduate studies, each candidate is required to complete one of the following programs of studies:

Requirements - Thesis option (5.0 credits)
1.  2.0 credits in LAWS 12.0
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 5000 [0.5]
Theories of Law and Social Transformation
LAWS 5001 [0.5]
Legal Method and Social Inquiry
3.  2.0 credits in:2.0
LAWS 5909 [2.0]
M.A. Thesis 2
which includes an oral examination
Total Credits5.0
Requirements - Research essay option (5.0 credits)
1.  3.0 credits in LAWS 13.0
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 5000 [0.5]
Theories of Law and Social Transformation
LAWS 5001 [0.5]
Legal Method and Social Inquiry
3.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 5908 [1.0]
M.A. Research Essay 2
Total Credits5.0
Requirements - Course option (5.0 credits)
1.  4.5 credits in LAWS 14.5
2.  0.5 credits in:0.5
LAWS 5000 [0.5]
Theories of Law and Social Transformation
Total Credits5.0
1Students are encouraged to take 0.5 credit in a related discipline, in consultation with the supervisor of graduate studies.
2Thesis/Research Essay: The thesis or research essay must represent the result of the candidate's independent research undertaken after being admitted into graduate studies in the Department of Law. Previous work of the candidate may be used only as introductory or background material for the thesis or research essay. A student may carry on research work related to the thesis or research essay off campus if the work is approved in advance and supervision arrangements have been made with the supervisor of graduate studies.
Selection of Courses in Related Disciplines

In addition to the graduate courses offered by the Department of Law, students in the M.A. program are encouraged to take at least 0.5 credit in a related discipline, in consultation with the supervisor of graduate studies.

Students can propose taking a graduate level course from any department in the University but the following disciplines tend to provide courses of particular interest to Legal Studies students: Canadian Studies, Economics, Geography, History, International Affairs, Journalism and Communication, Political Science, Psychology, Public Administration, Sociology and Anthropology, Social Work.

Requirements - Thesis option
1.  0.5 credit in:0.5
AFRI 5000 [0.5]
African Studies as a Discipline: Historical and Current Perspectives
2.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 5000 [0.5]
Theories of Law and Social Transformation
LAWS 5001 [0.5]
Legal Method and Social Inquiry
3.  0.0 credit in:
AFRI 5800 [0.0]
Scholarly Preparation in African Studies
4.  1.5 credits in LAWS 11.5
5.  2.0 credits in:2.0
LAWS 5909 [2.0]
M.A. Thesis (which includes an oral examination) 2
Total Credits5.0
Requirements - Research essay option (5.0 credits)
1.  0.5 credit in:0.5
AFRI 5000 [0.5]
African Studies as a Discipline: Historical and Current Perspectives
2.  0.0 credit in:0.0
AFRI 5800 [0.0]
Scholarly Preparation in African Studies
3.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 5000 [0.5]
Theories of Law and Social Transformation
LAWS 5001 [0.5]
Legal Method and Social Inquiry
4.  2.5 credits in LAWS 12.5
5.  1.0 credit in:1.0
LAWS 5908 [1.0]
M.A. Research Essay 2
Total Credits5.0
1Students are encouraged to take 0.5 credit in a related discipline, in consultation with the supervisor of graduate studies.
2Thesis/Research Essay: The thesis or research essay must represent the result of the candidate's independent research undertaken after being admitted into graduate studies in the Department of Law. Previous work of the candidate may be used only as introductory or background material for the thesis or research essay. A student may carry on research work related to the thesis or research essay off campus if the work is approved in advance and supervision arrangements have been made with the supervisor of graduate studies.
Requirements:
1.  0.5 credit in:0.5
LAWS 6000 [0.5]
Doctoral Seminar in Legal Studies
2.  0.5 credit in:0.5
LAWS 6001 [0.5]
Proseminar in Legal Studies
3.  2.0 credits in:2.0
LAWS 6095 [1.0]
Field Comprehensive
LAWS 6096 [1.0]
Thesis Proposal
4.  1.5 credits in approved courses, at least 0.5 of which must be chosen from1.5
LAWS 6002 [0.5]
Law, Regulation and Governance
LAWS 6003 [0.5]
Human Rights, Citizenship and Global Justice
LAWS 6004 [0.5]
Crime, Law, and Security
Students will normally be required to take the course which relates to their field of study. Optional courses will be selected from a list approved annually by the department. Students may complete up to 1.0 credit of approved courses offered in other departments. Students may also choose directed reading courses with the core faculty of the program
5. Language requirements as noted below
6.  5.5 credits in:5.5
LAWS 6909 [5.5]
Ph. D. Thesis
Total Credits10.0
Requirements:
1.  0.5 credit in:0.5
LAWS 6000 [0.5]
Doctoral Seminar in Legal Studies
2.  0.5 credit in:0.5
LAWS 6001 [0.5]
Proseminar in Legal Studies
4.  2.0 credits in:2.0
LAWS 6095 [1.0]
Field Comprehensive
LAWS 6096 [1.0]
Thesis Proposal
5.  0.5 credit from:0.5
LAWS 6002 [0.5]
Law, Regulation and Governance
LAWS 6003 [0.5]
Human Rights, Citizenship and Global Justice
LAWS 6004 [0.5]
Crime, Law, and Security
6. Language requirement as noted below
7.  0.5 credit in:0.5
PECO 6000 [0.5]
Political Economy: Core Concepts
8.  0.5 credit in:0.5
A relevant political economy course from the approved list
9.  5.5 credits in:5.5
LAWS 6909 [5.5]
Ph. D. Thesis
Total Credits10.0

Selection of Courses - Political Economy

In addition to the graduate courses offered by, or associated with, the Institute of Political Economy, the courses listed below are relevant to students of political economy and would, with the prior approval of the Institute, be used to design a coherent and internally complementary set of courses to fulfill degree requirements. The list is not exclusive and is subject to change.

Master's students may select 1.0 credit in political economy at the 4000-level.

Note: the number of spaces in graduate courses offered by other departments may be limited, and registration may be conditional upon obtaining the prior approval of the department concerned. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that permission is obtained from the appropriate department prior to registering in any of the following courses.

Anthropology

ANTH 5106 [0.5]North American Indigenous Peoples
ANTH 5107 [0.5]Issues in North American Ethnohistory
ANTH 5109 [0.5]Ethnography, Gender and Globalization
ANTH 5202 [0.5]The Anthropology of Underdevelopment
ANTH 5208 [0.5]Anthropology of Indigeneity
ANTH 5210 [0.5]Special Topics in Indigenous Studies
ANTH 5560 [0.5]Economic Anthropology
ANTH 5704 [0.5]Anthropology of the Body, Health, Illness and Healing
ANTH 5808 [0.5]Selected Topics in North American Native Studies
ANTH 5809 [0.5]Selected Topics in the Anthropology of Development and Underdevelopment

Canadian Studies

CDNS 5101 [0.5]Indigenous Peoples, Canada and the North
CDNS 5102 [0.5]Indigenous Politics and Resurgence in Canada
CDNS 5201 [0.5]Critical Perspectives on Canadian Feminism
CDNS 5202 [0.5]Gendering Canada: Selected Contemporary Debates
CDNS 5501 [0.5]Decolonizing Canada: Cultural Politics and Collective Identities
CDNS 5601 [0.5]Constructing Canada: The Politics of National Identity

 Communication and Media Studies

COMS 5200 [0.5]Civic Media
COMS 5206 [0.5]Communication, Culture, Regulation
COMS 5214 [0.5]The Local and the Global
COMS 5219 [0.5]Regional Studies of Media
COMS 5224 [0.5]Internet, Infrastructure, Materialities
COMS 5225 [0.5]Critical Data Studies

Geography

GEOG 5005 [0.5]Global Environmental Change: Human Implications
GEOG 5400 [0.5]Territory and Territoriality
GEOG 5500 [0.5]Special Topics in the Study of Cities and Urbanization
GEOG 5502 [0.5]Special Topics in Geography of Globalization
GEOG 5600 [0.5]Empire and Colonialism

 History

HIST 5210 [0.5]Power
HIST 5211 [0.5]Consumption
HIST 5314 [0.5]Colonialism and Postcolonialism in Canada
HIST 5315 [0.5]State and Society in Canadian History
HIST 5803 [0.5]History of Women, Gender and Sexuality: Foundations

Law

LAWS 5002 [0.5]Law and Gender Relations
LAWS 5003 [0.5]Law, Economy and Society
LAWS 5004 [0.5]Law, Crime and Social Order
LAWS 5005 [0.5]Law, State and Politics
LAWS 5006 [0.5]Historical Perspectives on Law and Society
LAWS 5007 [0.5]Race, Ethnicity and the Law
LAWS 5200 [0.5]International Economic Law: Regulation of Trade and Investment
LAWS 5302 [0.5]Feminism, Law and Social Transformation
LAWS 5306 [0.5]Police and Capital

 Political Economy

PECO 5501 [0.5]
Selected Problems in Political Economy I
PECO 5502 [0.5]
Selected Problems in Political Economy II

Political Science

PSCI 5003 [0.5]Political Parties in Canada
PSCI 5008 [0.5]The Politics of Climate Change
PSCI 5009 [0.5]Canadian Political Economy
PSCI 5100 [0.5]Indigenous Politics of North America
PSCI 5105 [0.5]Post-Communist Politics in East Central Europe
PSCI 5107 [0.5]Globalization, Adjustment and Democracy in Africa
PSCI 5202 [0.5]Development Theory and Issues
PSCI 5207 [0.5]International Political Sociology
PSCI 5208 [0.5]Global Social Policy
PSCI 5209 [0.5]Migration and Global Politics
PSCI 5303 [0.5]Governmentality and Politics
PSCI 5410 [0.5]Postcolonial Theories and Practices
PSCI 5509 [0.5]Governing in the Global Economy
PSCI 5607 [0.5]Politics of North America
PSCI 5802 [0.5]Political Economy of Global Money and Finance
PSCI 5808 [0.5]International Political Economy
PSCI 5810 [0.5]Approaches to Environmental Politics

Public Administration

PADM 5213 [0.5]Gender and Public Policy
PADM 5220 [0.5]Regulation and Public Policy
PADM 5224 [0.5]Aboriginal Policy
PADM 5228 [0.5]Social Policy
PADM 5811 [0.5]The International Policy Framework
PADM 5813 [0.5]The Evolution of World Bank/IMF Policy Conditionality
PADM 5814 [0.5]Program and Project Management

 Social Work

SOWK 5102 [0.5]Political Economy of Health
SOWK 5105 [0.5]Poverty and Income Security
SOWK 5106 [0.5]Women and Social Policy
SOWK 5301 [0.5]Women, Male Violence and Social Change
SOWK 5805 [0.5]Social Development in the International Context

Sociology

SOCI 5000 [0.5]Classical Sociological Theory
SOCI 5002 [0.5]Contemporary Sociological Theory
SOCI 5007 [0.5]Social Change and Economic Development
SOCI 5204 [0.5]Consuming Passions: The Regulation of Consumption, Appearance and Sexuality
SOCI 5205 [1.0]Canadian Society
SOCI 5209 [0.5]Sociology of Science and Technology
SOCI 5305 [0.5]Police and Capital
SOCI 5308 [0.5]Feminist Analyses
SOCI 5400 [0.5]Political Sociology
SOCI 5404 [0.5]Race, Ethnicity and Class in Contemporary Societies
SOCI 5405 [0.5]Power and Stratification
SOCI 5407 [0.5]Governmentality and Politics
SOCI 5408 [0.5]Feminism and Materialism
SOCI 5409 [0.5]The Politics of Social Movements and the State
SOCI 5504 [0.5]Selected Problems in Political Economy I
SOCI 5607 [0.5]Contemporary Theories of Crime and Social Regulation
SOCI 5804 [0.5]Modern Marxist Theory
SOCI 5806 [0.5]Selected Topics in Sociology

Comprehensive Examination and Thesis Proposal

As indicated above, each doctoral candidate must successfully write and pass a field comprehensive examination ( LAWS 6095 [1.0]). The examination will focus on the relevant theoretical and methodological issues related to the candidate's field of study:

  1. Crime, Law and Security
  2. Human Rights, Citizenship and Global Justice
  3. Law, Regulation and Governance

The examination can take a variety of forms including, for example, a major paper, a take-home examination, or a course design, each of which may be required to be defended at an oral examination. The exact format of the comprehensive examination is at the discretion of the student's supervisory committee in consultation with the student. This committee will also form the examining board of the comprehensive examination. Evaluation is on the basis of Pass with Distinction/Pass/Fail. LAWS 6095 [1.0] will normally be completed no later than the end of the fall of the second year of registration in the program. Failure to complete the examination successfully will result in denial of permission to continue in the program.

Also as indicated above, each doctoral candidate must successfully complete and defend a thesis proposal ( LAWS 6096 [1.0]). The proposal must be written after the completion of the other course requirements, and normally should be completed by the end of the second year of doctoral study. The proposal is defended at an oral examination conducted by the supervisory committee. Evaluation is on the basis: Pass/Fail. The proposal must be successfully defended before the candidate can register in the Ph.D. Thesis ( LAWS 6909 [5.5]).

Thesis

The Ph.D. thesis must be successfully defended at an oral examination.

Language Requirements

Candidates must demonstrate reading ability in an approved language, other than English, normally by successfully completing a translation examination during the second year of full-time enrollment in the program.

Period of Study

This program is designed to be completed in four years of full-time study. Students admitted to part-time study will normally complete all requirements within eight years of registration.

Selection of Courses in Related Disciplines

In addition to the graduate courses offered by the Department of Law, students in the Ph.D. program are permitted to take up to 1.0 credit of courses in a related discipline, in consultation with the Graduate Supervisor.

Students should be aware that the number of spaces in graduate courses offered by other departments may be limited, and that registration may be conditional upon obtaining the prior approval of the department concerned. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that permission is obtained from the appropriate department prior to registering in any of the department's courses.

For an up-to-date listing of offerings and course descriptions in other departments, please consult the graduate calendar and the class schedule at https://central.carleton.ca.

Law (LAWS) Courses

Note: some graduate courses may also be open to interested fourth-year students with permission of the Department.

LAWS 5000 [0.5 credit]
Theories of Law and Social Transformation

Examines three groups of theories of law (liberal, sociological and Marxist) focusing on different ways law is conceived as an object of inquiry and on different accounts of trajectories of legal development. Potential of law for realizing or inhibiting social change provides analytic framework.

LAWS 5001 [0.5 credit]
Legal Method and Social Inquiry

Introduces problems of research strategy and methods. Explores contrasting methodologies in legal research; evaluates methodologies employed in understanding legal reasoning, discourses, and practices. Includes seminars in which participants present outlines of their own research projects, focusing on methodologies and research questions.

LAWS 5002 [0.5 credit]
Law and Gender Relations

Examines theoretical approaches informed by significance of gender to structure and operation of law. Concepts such as essentialism, difference, cultural determination, and social construction of gender relations examined in context of contemporary feminist debates. Focus on understanding and facility with feminist analysis and methodology.

LAWS 5003 [0.5 credit]
Law, Economy and Society

Addresses the relationship between law, economy, and society. Competing theoretical accounts of the relationship between legal regulation and social and economic change explored through selected historical and contemporary case studies.

LAWS 5004 [0.5 credit]
Law, Crime and Social Order

Examines issues of crime control and state security through topical, in-depth investigations into contemporary problems. Focus is on critically analyzing the criminal justice system, and crime control strategies, as order maintenance /social control.

LAWS 5005 [0.5 credit]
Law, State and Politics

Examines theoretical explanations of relationships between law, state and politics, Selected areas such as rights theory, rule of law, separation of powers or judicial review may provide focus.

LAWS 5006 [0.5 credit]
Historical Perspectives on Law and Society

Examines historical relationship between social forces, law and legal institutions and utility of historical forms of knowledge and methods to legal studies. Surveys selected issues in private, public and criminal law.

LAWS 5007 [0.5 credit]
Race, Ethnicity and the Law

Examines ways race and racism interact with gender and class in shaping legal system. Explores ways legal system institutionalizes racism and potential for using the legal system to combat racism. Selected areas such as immigration law and native rights may be used to illustrate themes.

LAWS 5008 [0.5 credit]
Consuming Passions: The Regulation of Consumption, Appearance and Sexuality

Examines rise of consumption and private pleasures and their regulation and self-regulation. Social history of regulation of two fields of consumption: surfaces of the person: personal appearance, in particular of dress, the body, sexuality; and intakes of the body, focusing on food, alcohol, drugs.
Also listed as SOCI 5204.

LAWS 5100 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Problems in Legal Philosophy

Studies in legal theory and analyses of law advanced by Hart, Dworkin, and others, and legal concepts: for example, principles, rights, duties, liability, etc. Precise course content will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of the term.
Also listed as PHIL 5100.
Prerequisite(s): either LAWS 3105 or LAWS 3101 (PHIL 3101) and LAWS 3102 (PHIL 3102), or permission of the Department.

LAWS 5200 [0.5 credit]
International Economic Law: Regulation of Trade and Investment

Study of regulation of international economic activity. Discussion of relevant international institutions, legal aspects of integration, governmental regulation of trade and investment.
Also listed as INAF 5507.
Prerequisite(s): Open only to students in their master's year who have not studied international economic law.

LAWS 5302 [0.5 credit]
Feminism, Law and Social Transformation

Drawing on contemporary cases and/or historical contexts to explore limits and impact of feminist legal engagement. Race, class, disability, sexuality and other social categories and changing feminist conceptions of law and sites of legal relations, politics and activism: the meaning of social transformation.


LAWS 5305 [0.5 credit]
Crime, Social Change and Criminal Law Reform

Political, practical and ideological dimensions of criminal law reform and activism undertaken by individuals, groups and the state to achieve social transformation. Reform initiatives are considered in relation to their effects on race, class, gender, sexuality, disability and other sites of difference and discrimination.


LAWS 5306 [0.5 credit]
Police and Capital

The idea of `police' as a general historical project aimed at the fabrication of social order and the development of liberal philosophy, political economy and security. Contemporary public and private security provision considered in light of commodification, class conflict, and risk thinking.
Also listed as SOCI 5305.

LAWS 5500 [0.5 credit]
The Canadian Constitution

Familiarizes students with terminology, principles, and doctrines of judicial interpretation of Constitution Acts 1867-1982 and other constitutional statutes. Emphasis on division of legislative powers in the Canadian federation.
Prerequisite(s): open only to graduate students in their master's year who have not previously studied Canadian constitutional law.

LAWS 5603 [0.5 credit]
International Law: Theory and Practice

Legal principles governing international relations; emphasis on different theoretical, historical and political perspectives, such as Natural Law, Positivism, Critical Legal Studies, TWAIL, Feminism, Marxism. Specific case studies or topics are examined to critically interrogate the foundations and practices of international law.
Also listed as INAF 5505.


LAWS 5662 [0.5 credit]
Law, Regulation and Governance

Historical and contemporary roles of law and regulation in processes, practices and discourses of governance. Law and state; domestic and global governance; diversity of law-governance relationships; law as a constituent force, enforcement mechanism and a distinctive product of governance.
Also offered, with different requirements as appropriate, as LAWS 6002, for which additional credit is precluded.

LAWS 5663 [0.5 credit]
Human Rights, Citizenship and Global Justice

The implications of law in selected issues involving human rights, citizenship and global justice. Topics may include justification and legitimation of human rights, contemporary citizenship, struggles for global justice, recognition and democracy, and post-nationalism and global economic regulation.
Also offered with different requirements where appropriate, as LAWS 6003, for which additional credit is precluded.

LAWS 5664 [0.5 credit]
Crime, Law and Security

Contemporary debates around crime, criminal justice and security as mediated through law. The interrelationship between the politics, process and reform of criminal justice in a socio-legal context.
Also offered as LAWS 6004, with different requirements where appropriate, for which additional credit is precluded.

LAWS 5700 [0.5 credit]
Theories of Conflict Resolution

An introduction to the field of conflict studies, negotiation and mediation theory including: analyzing and resolving conflict, negotiation styles, orientations and models of mediation, alternative dispute resolution, building consensus, current issues and trends in the field of conflict studies.

LAWS 5701 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Conflict Resolution and Mediation

Introduction to the practice of negotiation and mediation including: contextualizing conflict resolution, understanding how to negotiate and mediate, determining the role of the negotiator/ mediator, reviewing the current state of mediation and conflict resolution, and understanding the importance of a theory-informed practice.

LAWS 5702 [0.5 credit]
Advanced Conflict Resolution and Mediation

Building upon the theory and skills of conflict resolution and mediation introduced in LAWS 5701. Students will learn to convene a mediation, analyze the level of conflict, design a conflict resolution process, co-mediate, and facilitate a multi-party problem solving session.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 5701.

LAWS 5703 [0.5 credit]
Organizational Conflict and System Design

Students will learn to apply conceptual frameworks to the diagnosis and assessment of organizational conflict, develop and implement appropriate intervention programs and strategies, and design conflict management systems for organizations.

LAWS 5704 [0.5 credit]
Multi-Party, Multi-Issue Conflict Resolution and Consensus Building

Using case studies where mediators have successfully assisted competing interest groups in finding mutual-gains resolutions to conflicts, students will expand upon their personal skills of crisis intervention, group facilitation, assisted negotiation, dispute resolution process design and coaching.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 5701 and LAWS 5702 or equivalent.

LAWS 5705 [0.5 credit]
Mediation in Family Matters

Students will examine family dynamics and family conflict and explore conflict within intact families as well as conflict that arises when parties separate. The practical aspects of mediation such as ethics, professional standards and screening, as well as intake and outcome documents will be discussed.

LAWS 5706 [0.5 credit]
Special Topics in Conflict Resolution

This research seminar will explore a selected topic from current debates in conflict resolution and conflict management.
Prerequisite(s): LAWS 5700.

LAWS 5708 [0.5 credit]
Applied Research Project

Independent research in the theory and practice of conflict analysis, prevention or intervention, including system design, process intervention, and evaluation. The project must represent the candidate’s independent study after being admitted to the program. Previous work may be used only as introductory or background material.

LAWS 5709 [0.5 credit]
Skills Assessment

Assessors evaluate a student’s readiness to mediate disputes through a simulated mediation. Must be completed within one year after completion of course work. Option for the final requirement of the Graduate Diploma in Conflict Resolution.
Prerequisite(s): completion of five Graduate Diploma in Conflict Resolution courses.

LAWS 5900 [0.5 credit]
Tutorials/Directed Readings in Law

Tutorials or reading courses on selected topics may be arranged with the permission of the supervisor of graduate studies and the approval of the supervising faculty member.

LAWS 5901 [0.5 credit]
Tutorial/Directed Readings in Law

Tutorials or reading courses on selected topics may be arranged with the permission of the supervisor of graduate studies and the approval of the supervising faculty member.

LAWS 5903 [0.5 credit]
Contemporary Topics in Legal Studies

A research seminar which explores a selected topic from current debates in legal studies. Students should check with the Department regarding the topic offered.

LAWS 5904 [0.5 credit]
Contemporary Topics in Legal Studies

A research seminar which explores a selected topic from current debates in legal studies.

LAWS 5908 [1.0 credit]
M.A. Research Essay


LAWS 5909 [2.0 credits]
M.A. Thesis


LAWS 6000 [0.5 credit]
Doctoral Seminar in Legal Studies

Analysis of the major themes, approaches and literature in contemporary legal and social theory.

LAWS 6001 [0.5 credit]
Proseminar in Legal Studies

A seminar which meets every two weeks throughout the academic year. Based on presentations of papers and works in progress by faculty, students and invited guests, as well as assigned readings on issues that deal with current research in legal studies.

LAWS 6002 [0.5 credit]
Law, Regulation and Governance

Historical and contemporary roles of law and regulation in processes, practices and discourses of governance. Law and state; domestic and global governance; diversity of law-governance relationships; law as a constituent force, enforcement mechanism and a distinctive product of governance.
Also offered as LAWS 5662, with different requirements where appropriate, for which additional credit is precluded.

LAWS 6003 [0.5 credit]
Human Rights, Citizenship and Global Justice

The implications of law in selected issues involving human rights, citizenship and global justice. Topics may include justification and legitimation of human rights, contemporary citizenship, struggles for global justice, recognition and democracy, and post-nationalism and global economic regulation.
Also offered as LAWS 5663, with different requirements where appropriate, for which additional credit is precluded.

LAWS 6004 [0.5 credit]
Crime, Law, and Security

Contemporary debates around crime, criminal justice and security as mediated through law. The interrelationship between the politics, process and reform of criminal justice in a socio-legal context.
Also offered as LAWS 5664, with different requirements where appropriate, for which additional credit is precluded.

LAWS 6010 [0.5 credit]
Directed Readings in Legal Studies

Advanced directed readings in selected areas of legal studies, involving presentation of papers as the basis for discussion with the course instructor.


LAWS 6095 [1.0 credit]
Field Comprehensive

The field comprehensive examination will focus on the relevant theoretical and/or methodological issues related to the field of study. The examination can take a variety of forms and will be decided by the supervisory committee in consultation with the student. The form of the exam will be in accordance with departmental policy.

LAWS 6096 [1.0 credit]
Thesis Proposal

The thesis proposal must be written after the completion of the other course requirements, and normally will be completed by the end of the second year of doctoral study. The proposal is defended at an oral examination conducted by the supervisory committee. Evaluation is on the basis of SAT/UNS.

LAWS 6909 [5.5 credits]
Ph. D. Thesis


Summer session: some of the courses listed in this Calendar are offered during the summer. Hours and scheduling for summer session courses will differ significantly from those reported in the fall/winter Calendar. To determine the scheduling and hours for summer session classes, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Not all courses listed are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for the current session and to determine the term of offering, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Regulations

See the General Regulations section of this Calendar.

Guidelines for Completion of Master's Degree

Full-time students are expected to complete the required two courses LAWS 5000 and LAWS 5001 and either an additional 2.0 credits (for those following the thesis program), or an additional 3.0 credits (for those following the research essay program) by the end of the second term of registration. The thesis or research essay should normally be submitted by the end of the fourth term of study.

Part-time students are expected to complete the required two courses LAWS 5000 and LAWS 5001 and either an additional 2.0 credits (for those following the thesis program) or an additional 3.0 credits (for those following the research essay program) by the end of their third year of study. The thesis or research essay should normally be submitted by the end of the fifth year of study.

Regulations

See the General Regulations section of this Calendar.

Doctoral students must normally obtain a grade of B- or better in each course counted toward the fulfillment of the requirements of the degree.

Admission

The requirement for admission into the M.A. program in Legal Studies is an Honours bachelor's degree or the equivalent, with at least high honours standing.

Applicants will be considered for admission on the basis of their academic background and standing. Where relevant, previous professional experience may be taken into account.

The Supervisor of Graduate Studies may, in some circumstances, recommend that applicants with exceptional promise who have less than BA (Honours) status be admitted into a qualifying-year program designed to raise their standing to honours status.

Applicants without a background in law may be required to complete one or more designated courses from the department's undergraduate program before taking courses towards the master's degree.

Application deadlines can be found at: https://gsapplications.carleton.ca

Admission

Applicants will normally hold a master's degree (or equivalent) with at least an A- average. Given the interdisciplinary nature of the department and the graduate program, applications are accepted from a wide variety of backgrounds, including, but not limited to, legal studies, political science, history, criminology, sociology, women's studies and philosophy. In cases of uncertainty, potential applicants are encouraged to contact the Graduate Supervisor as to the suitability of their background. Depending on their academic background, applicants may be asked to complete course work in addition to the Ph.D. program requirements.