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Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies
(Faculty of Public Affairs)
613-520-2888
http://carleton.ca/eurus

This section presents the requirements for programs in:

Program Requirements

EURUS Language Requirement

All EURUS BA Honours, BA Combined Honours, and BA General candidates are required to demonstrate proficiency in a major regional language.  Language proficiency is defined as the completion of an intermediate level of university language instruction (two years, 2.0 Carleton credits).  Students who wish to count a relevant regional language that is not taught at Carleton should consult with and request approval from the Undergraduate Supervisor.  

Students in the Bachelor of Global and International Studies Specialization or Stream Europe and Russia in the World must complete the BGInS Language requirement in an approved regional language of Europe, Russia, and Eurasia.  See the BGInS Language Requirement for details.

Students are encouraged to continue with language instruction beyond the intermediate level required for the Institute Language Requirement.  Advanced-level regional language courses may be counted towards EURUS degree requirements (see specific program requirements for details). 

This Institute Language requirement may be fulfilled in one of three ways:

  1. Completion of one of the following courses (or equivalent): FREN 1100; FREN 1110; GERM 2020; GERM 2110; ITAL 2020; ITAL 2110; PORT 2110; RUSS 2020; SPAN 2020; SPAN 2110.
    Courses at other institutions may also be used to meet the language requirement as long as they are accepted by the Department of French or the School of Linguistics and Language Studies as being equivalent to or at a higher level than the courses listed above.  For languages not taught at Carleton, an intermediate level is equal to two full years (2.0 Carleton credit) of university-level language instruction.
  2. Certification by the unit offering the relevant language or the Institute that the student has attained a level of language proficiency equivalent to completion of one of the courses above.  Proficiency may be demonstrated through documentation.
  3. Secondary School Language of Instruction: Students whose secondary school transcripts show that their primary language of instruction in secondary school was a relevant regional language other than English may be exempted from the language requirement.  Subject to approval of the Undergraduate Supervisor.

European and Russian Studies
B.A. Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (10.0 credits):
1.  0.5 credit in: Foundations0.5
EURR 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to European and Russian Studies
2.  1.0 credit in: Core Politics, Society, and International Affairs1.0
EURR 2001 [0.5]
Current Issues in European Politics and Society
EURR 2002 [0.5]
Europe and Russia in the World
3.  1.0 credit in: Core Literature and Culture1.0
EURR 3001 [0.5]
Literature and Culture in Europe
EURR 3002 [0.5]
Literature and Culture in Russia and Eurasia
4.  1.0 credit from: Modern History category1.0
5.  1.5 credits from: Politics and Economics category. Must include credits in both PSCI and ECON1.5
6.  0.5 credit from: Language, Art, Culture category0.5
7.  0.5 credit from: Contexts and Methods for Regional Studies category0.5
8.  2.0 credits from: Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies. May include EURR not used to fulfill another requirement. No more than 1.0 credit from the Contexts and Methods for Regional Studies category.2.0
9.  2.0 credits from: EURUS 4000-level Honours category. At least 1.0 credit in EURR. May include EURR 4908 (1.0) Honours Essay2.0
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (10.0 credits):
10.  1.0 credit from:1.0
ECON 1001 [0.5]
& ECON 1002 [0.5]
Introduction to Microeconomics
Introduction to Macroeconomics
or FYSM 1003 [1.0]
Introduction to Economics
11.  9.0 credits in free electives.9.0
C. Additional Requirements
12. The EURUS Language Requirement must be met.
Total Credits20.0

Notes:

1. See "Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies" section of the calendar for a list of approved courses that fulfill specific categories in the requirements above.

2.  With the permission of the Institute, students who transfer or enter the program after first year may substitute a course from Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies for EURR 1001.

 

European and Russian Studies
B.A. Combined Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the EURUS Major CGPA (7.0 credits)
1.  0.5 credit in: Foundations0.5
EURR 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to European and Russian Studies
2.  1.0 credit in: Core Politics, Society, and International Affairs1.0
EURR 2001 [0.5]
Current Issues in European Politics and Society
EURR 2002 [0.5]
Europe and Russia in the World
3.  1.0 credit in: Core Literature and Culture1.0
EURR 3001 [0.5]
Literature and Culture in Europe
EURR 3002 [0.5]
Literature and Culture in Russia and Eurasia
4.  1.0 credit from: Modern History category1.0
5.  1.0 credit from: Politics and Economics category. Must include credits in both PSCI and ECON1.0
6.  0.5 credit from: Language, Art, Culture category0.5
7.  1.0 credit from: Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies. May include EURR not used to fulfill another requirement. No more than 0.5 credit from the Contexts and Methods for Regional Studies category.1.0
8.  1.0 credit from: EURUS 4000-level Honours category. At least 0.5 credit in EURR. May include EURR 4908 (1.0) Honours Essay1.0
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (13.0 credits)13.0
9.  1.0 credit from:
ECON 1001 [0.5]
& ECON 1002 [0.5]
Introduction to Microeconomics
Introduction to Macroeconomics
or FYSM 1003 [1.0]
Introduction to Economics
10. The requirements from the other discipline must be satisfied
11. Sufficient free electives to make 20.0 credits for the degree.
C. Additional Requirements
12. The EURUS Language Requirement must be met.
Total Credits20.0

Notes:

  1. At most, one Honours essay course from either department may be counted toward this Combined program.
  2. Combined Honours in European and Russian Studies and Journalism is available only to students already admitted to the Bachelor of Journalism degree.
  3. With the permission of the Institute, students who enter the program after first year may substitute a course from the list of Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies for EURR 1001.
 

European and Russian Studies
B.A. (15.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (7.0 credits)
1.  0.5 credit in: Foundations0.5
EURR 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to European and Russian Studies
2.  1.0 credit in: Core Politics, Society, and International Affairs1.0
EURR 2001 [0.5]
Current Issues in European Politics and Society
EURR 2002 [0.5]
Europe and Russia in the World
3.  1.0 credit in: Core Literature and Culture1.0
EURR 3001 [0.5]
Literature and Culture in Europe
EURR 3002 [0.5]
Literature and Culture in Russia and Eurasia
4.  1.0 credit from: Modern History category1.0
5.  1.0 credit from: Politics and Economics category1.0
6.  2.5 credits from: Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies. May include EURR not used to fulfill another requirement. No more than 1.0 credit from the Contexts and Methods for Regional Studies category.2.5
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (8.0 credits)
7.  8.0 credits in free electives8.0
C. Additional Requirements
8. The EURUS language requirement must be met.
Total Credits15.0
Notes:
  1. See "Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies" section of the calendar for a list of approved courses that fulfill specific categories in the requirements above.
  2. With the permission of the Institute, students who enter the program after first year may substitute a course from the list of Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies for EURR 1001.
 

Bachelor of Global and International Studies (B.G.In.S.)

Note: Details regarding graduation requirements, the international experience requirement, and the language requirement for the B.G.In.S. degree can be found at the B.G.In.S. program page.

Specialization in Europe and Russia in the World
B.G.In.S. Honours (20.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (12.0 credits)
1.  4.5 credits in: Core Courses4.5
GINS 1000 [0.5]
Global History
GINS 1010 [0.5]
International Law and Politics
GINS 1020 [0.5]
Ethnography, Globalization and Culture
GINS 2000 [0.5]
Ethics and Globalization
GINS 2010 [0.5]
Globalization and International Economic Issues
GINS 2020 [0.5]
Global Literatures
GINS 3010 [0.5]
Global and International Theory
GINS 3020 [0.5]
Places, Boundaries, Movements and Global Environmental Change
GINS 4090 [0.5]
Honours Seminar in Global and International Studies
2.  0.0 credit in: International Experience Requirement Preparation
GINS 1300 [0.0]
International Experience Requirement Preparation
3.  7.5 credits in: the Specialization7.5
a. 0.5 credit in: Foundations
EURR 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to European and Russian Studies
b. 1.0 credit in: Core Politics, Society, and International Affairs
EURR 2001 [0.5]
Current Issues in European Politics and Society
EURR 2002 [0.5]
Europe and Russia in the World
c. 1.0 credit in: Core Literature and Culture
EURR 3001 [0.5]
Literature and Culture in Europe
EURR 3002 [0.5]
Literature and Culture in Russia and Eurasia
d. 1.0 credit from: Modern History category
e. 1.0 credit from: Politics and Economics category
f. 0.5 credit from: Language, Art, Culture category
g. 1.0 credit from: Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies. May include EURR not used to fulfill another requirement. No more than 0.5 credit from the Contexts and Methods for Regional Studies category.
h. 1.5 credit from: EURUS 4000-level Honours Course category. At least 1.0 credit in EURR. May include EURR 4908 (1.0) Honours Essay.
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (8.0 credits)
4.  8.0 credits in: free electives8.0
C. Additional Requirements
5. The International Experience requirement must be met.
6. The BGINS Language requirement must be met with a regional language relevant to Europe and Russia other than English. The Program Director will maintain a list of those languages suitable for meeting this requirement.
Total Credits20.0
 

Stream in Europe and Russia in the World
B.G.In.S. (15.0 credits)

A. Credits Included in the Major CGPA (8.0 credits):
1.  4.0 credits in: Core Courses4.0
GINS 1000 [0.5]
Global History
GINS 1010 [0.5]
International Law and Politics
GINS 1020 [0.5]
Ethnography, Globalization and Culture
GINS 2000 [0.5]
Ethics and Globalization
GINS 2010 [0.5]
Globalization and International Economic Issues
GINS 2020 [0.5]
Global Literatures
GINS 3010 [0.5]
Global and International Theory
GINS 3020 [0.5]
Places, Boundaries, Movements and Global Environmental Change
2.  4.0 credits from: the Stream4.0
a. 0.5 credit in: Foundations
EURR 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to European and Russian Studies
b. 1.0 credit in: Core Politics, Society, and International Affairs
EURR 2001 [0.5]
Current Issues in European Politics and Society
EURR 2002 [0.5]
Europe and Russia in the World
c. 2.5 credits from: Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies. May include:
EURR 3001 [0.5]
Literature and Culture in Europe
EURR 3002 [0.5]
Literature and Culture in Russia and Eurasia
B. Credits Not Included in the Major CGPA (7.0 credits):
3.  7.0 credits in: Free Electives7.0
C. Additional Requirements
4. The BGINS Language requirement must be met in a regional language relevant to Europe and Russia other than English. The Program Director will maintain a list of those languages suitable for meeting this requirement.
Total Credits15.0
 

Minor in European and Russian Studies (4.0 credits)

Open to all undergraduate degree students not in EURUS programs or the B.G.In.S. Specialization or Stream in Europe and Russia in the World.

Requirements:
1.  1.0 credit from: EURUS Foundation and Literature and Culture1.0
EURR 1001 [0.5]
Introduction to European and Russian Studies
EURR 3001 [0.5]
Literature and Culture in Europe
EURR 3002 [0.5]
Literature and Culture in Russia and Eurasia
2.  1.0 credit in: EURUS Core Politics and International Affairs1.0
EURR 2001 [0.5]
Current Issues in European Politics and Society
EURR 2002 [0.5]
Europe and Russia in the World
3.  0.5 credit from: Modern History category0.5
4.  0.5 credit from: Politics and Economics category0.5
5.  1.0 credit from: Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies. May include EURR courses not used to fulfill another requirement.1.0
6. The remaining requirements of the major discipline(s) and degree must be satisfied.
Total Credits4.0

Note: See the "Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies" section of the calendar for a list of courses that fulfill specific categories indicated in the requirements above.

Approved Courses in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

This list includes categories of approved courses that fulfill specific program requirements for all undergraduate programs in the Institute of European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (EURUS).  Students are advised that some courses may have prerequisites that must be met in order to register for a particular course.

Modern History
HIST 2207 [1.0]
Nineteenth-Century Europe
HIST 2502 [0.5]
Modern Britain
HIST 2508 [0.5]
France since 1889
HIST 2510 [0.5]
19th-Century Germany
HIST 2511 [0.5]
20th-Century Germany
HIST 2600 [1.0]
History of Russia
HIST 2802 [0.5]
War and Society in Modern Europe, 1789-1914
HIST 2803 [0.5]
War and Society in Modern Europe, 1914-1950
HIST 3113 [0.5]
Revolution and Society in France, 1789-1799
HIST 3115 [0.5]
Childhood and Youth in History
HIST 3217 [0.5]
Empire and Globalization
HIST 3604 [0.5]
Gender and Sexuality in Modern Europe
HIST 3714 [0.5]
Holocaust Encounters
HIST 3718 [0.5]
Germans and Jews
HIST 3800 [0.5]
International History 1914-41
HIST 3801 [0.5]
International History 1941-90
HIST 3902 [0.5]
Topics in European History
Politics and Economics
ECON 3807 [0.5]
European Economic Integration
ECON 3808 [0.5]
The Economics of Transition
PSCI 3105 [0.5]
Imperialism
PSCI 3206 [0.5]
European Democracies
PSCI 3207 [0.5]
The Government and Politics of European Integration
PSCI 3208 [0.5]
Politics in Russia and Ukraine: Power and Contestation
PSCI 3209 [0.5]
Reconstruction and Transformation in Europe and Eurasia
PSCI 3608 [0.5]
Migration Governance
PSCI 3704 [0.5]
Government and Politics of Central and Eastern Europe
Language, Art, Culture
GERM, ITAL, PORT, RUSS, SPAN or other approved course in a regional language at the 3000- or 4000-level or courses from the list below:
ARTH 1100 [0.5]
Art and Society: Prehistory to the Renaissance
ARTH 1101 [0.5]
Art and Society: Renaissance to the Present
ARTH 2202 [0.5]
Medieval Architecture and Art
ARTH 2300 [0.5]
Italian Renaissance Art
ARTH 2310 [0.5]
Architecture of the Early Modern World [1400-1750]
ARTH 2404 [0.5]
Art of the 17th and 18th Centuries
ARTH 2502 [0.5]
Art of the 19th Century
ARTH 2510 [0.5]
Architecture of the 18th and 19th Centuries
ARTH 3710 [0.5]
Architecture and Empire
FILM 2606 [0.5]
History of World Cinema I
FILM 2607 [0.5]
History of World Cinema II
FREN 2100 [1.0]
French 4
FREN 2110 [1.0]
French 4: Writing
FREN 2202 [0.5]
Introduction aux études littéraires 1
FREN 3212 [0.5]
Des manuscrits aux belles-lettres : de la littérature médiévale à l'humanisme
FREN 3213 [0.5]
Du Baroque aux Lumières
FREN 3214 [0.5]
Révolutions, avant-gardes et ruptures : du 19e siècle aux années 1950
FREN 3215 [0.5]
Les ères du soupçon : contemporanéités de la littérature
HIST 2102 [0.5]
Modern Thought and Culture: the Nineteenth Century
HIST 2103 [0.5]
Modern Thought and Culture: the Twentieth Century
HIST 3005 [0.5]
Medieval Aristocratic Life
HIST 3006 [0.5]
Medieval Religious Life
HIST 3007 [0.5]
Medieval Intellectual Life
HIST 3105 [0.5]
Renaissance Europe
HIST 3213 [0.5]
The Enlightenment
HIST 3214 [0.5]
The Enlightenment and Its Aftermath
MUSI 1001 [0.5]
A History of Western Classical Music: Medieval to the Present
MUSI 2100 [0.5]
Music in an Age of Power, Plague, and Courtly Love
MUSI 2101 [0.5]
Music in an Age of Devotion, Seduction, and Rebirth
MUSI 2102 [0.5]
Music in an Age of Spectacle, Commerce, and Colonization
MUSI 2103 [0.5]
Music in an Age of Order, Invention, and Revolution
MUSI 2104 [0.5]
Music in an Age of Passion, Imagination, and Iconoclasm
MUSI 2107 [0.5]
Music in an Age of Tumult, Innovation, and Pluralism
MUSI 3400 [0.5]
A History of Opera before 1800
MUSI 3401 [0.5]
A History of Opera from 1800 to 1945
PHIL 1610 [0.5]
Great Philosophical Ideas, Part 1
PHIL 1620 [0.5]
Great Philosophical Ideas, Part 2
PHIL 2005 [1.0]
Greek Philosophy and the Western Tradition
PHIL 2101 [0.5]
History of Ethics
PHIL 2103 [0.5]
Philosophy of Human Rights
PHIL 2202 [0.5]
Topics in Marxist Philosophy
PHIL 3002 [0.5]
17th Century Philosophy
PHIL 3003 [0.5]
18th Century Philosophy
PHIL 3005 [0.5]
19th Century Philosophy
PHIL 3009 [0.5]
Topics in European Philosophy
PHIL 3330 [0.5]
Topics in History of Social and Political Philosophy
PHIL 3340 [0.5]
Topics in Contemporary Social and Political Philosophy
PSCI 2301 [0.5]
History of Political Thought I
PSCI 2302 [0.5]
History of Political Thought II
PSCI 3308 [0.5]
Modern Political Thought
PSCI 3312 [0.5]
Enlightenment Political Thought
RELI 1710 [0.5]
Judaism, Christianity, Islam
RELI 2110 [0.5]
Judaism
RELI 2121 [0.5]
Hebrew Bible
RELI 2226 [0.5]
Christianity 1500-1900
RELI 2230 [0.5]
Global Christianity
RELI 2310 [0.5]
Islam
RELI 2320 [0.5]
Islam in the Modern World
Context and Methods for Regional Studies
COMS 2700 [0.5]
Global Media and Communication
COMS 3109 [0.5]
Communication, Culture and Identity
ECON 3600 [0.5]
Introduction to International Economics
ECON 3601 [0.5]
Introduction to International Trade
ECON 3602 [0.5]
International Monetary Problems
ECON 3870 [0.5]
Comparative Economic Systems
FYSM 1603 [1.0]
Full-Year Seminar in European and Russian Studies
FYSM 1614 [0.5]
One-Term Seminar in European and Russian Studies
GEOG 2023 [0.5]
Cities, Inequality and Urban Change
GEOG 2200 [0.5]
Global Connections
GEOG 2300 [0.5]
Space, Place and Culture
GEOG 2500 [0.5]
Climate Change: Social Science Perspectives
GEOG 3021 [0.5]
Geographies of Culture and Identity
GEOG 3023 [0.5]
Cities in a Global World
GEOG 3404 [0.5]
Geographies of Economic Development
HIST 1001 [1.0]
The Making of Europe
HIST 1002 [1.0]
Europe in the 20th Century
HIST 2811 [0.5]
Public History from Memory to Museums
HIST 3809 [0.5]
Historical Representations
HIST 3810 [0.5]
Historical Theory
HIST 3812 [0.5]
Digital History
HIST 3813 [0.5]
Problems in Global and Transnational Histories
IPAF 2000 [0.5]
Quantitative Approaches to Policy Analysis
IPAF 3900 [0.5]
International Placement
IPAF 3901 [1.0]
International Placement
IPAF 4900 [0.5]
Research Experience Course
LAWS 2105 [0.5]
Social Justice and Human Rights
LAWS 2601 [0.5]
Public International Law
LAWS 3602 [0.5]
International Human Rights
LAWS 3604 [0.5]
International Organizations
LAWS 3207 [0.5]
International Transactions
MGDS 2000 [0.5]
Global Migration and Transnationalism
PSCI 1200 [0.5]
World Politics
PSCI 2101 [0.5]
Comparative Politics of the Global North
PSCI 2500 [0.5]
Gender and Politics
PSCI 2601 [0.5]
International Relations: Global Politics
PSCI 2602 [0.5]
International Relations: Global Political Economy
PSCI 2701 [0.5]
Introduction to Research Methods in Political Science
PSCI 2702 [0.5]
Quantitative Research Methods in Political Science
PSCI 3107 [0.5]
The Causes of War
PSCI 3307 [0.5]
Politics of Human Rights
PSCI 3309 [0.5]
Modern Ideologies
PSCI 3600 [0.5]
International Institutions
PSCI 3703 [0.5]
Governing in the Global Economy
SOCI 2000 [0.5]
Foundations of Sociological Inquiry
SOCI 2001 [0.5]
Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
SOCI 2005 [1.0]
Histories of Sociological Thought
SOCI 2020 [0.5]
Race and Ethnicity
SOCI 2045 [0.5]
Gender and Society
SOCI 2160 [0.5]
War and Society
SOCI 2702 [0.5]
Power and Social Change
WGST 2800 [0.5]
Intersectional Identities
WGST 2801 [0.5]
Activism, Feminisms, and Social Justice
WGST 3803 [0.5]
Feminisms and Transnationalism
EURUS 4000-level Honours Courses
EURR 4002 [0.5]
Post-Soviet States and Societies
EURR 4003 [0.5]
Social and Political Perspectives in Europe
EURR 4008 [0.5]
Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Eastern and Central Europe
EURR 4100 [0.5]
Nation-Building in Central and Eastern Europe
EURR 4101 [0.5]
The Balkans in Transition – 1918 to 1989
EURR 4102 [0.5]
The Balkans since 1989
EURR 4103 [0.5]
The Great Russian Novel
EURR 4104 [0.5]
European Integration and European Security
EURR 4106 [0.5]
Selected Topics in European Integration Studies
EURR 4107 [0.5]
Russia’s Regional and Global Ambitions
EURR 4201 [0.5]
Special Topics in European Studies
EURR 4202 [0.5]
Special Topics in Russian and Eurasian Studies
EURR 4204 [0.5]
Central Europe, Past and Present
EURR 4205 [0.5]
Politics of Identity in Europe and the Russian Area
EURR 4206 [0.5]
Internship and Applied Policy Skills
EURR 4207 [0.5]
Politics of Central Eurasia
EURR 4208 [0.5]
Foreign Policies of Soviet Successor States
EURR 4209 [0.5]
Politics of the Caucasus and Caspian Basin
EURR 4302 [0.5]
EU Summer Study Abroad
EURR 4303 [0.5]
Contemporary Europe: From Postwar to the European Union
EURR 4304 [0.5]
Europe and International Migration
EURR 4305 [0.5]
Imperial Russia and the Russian Revolution
EURR 4306 [0.5]
The Soviet Union: Power and Culture
EURR 4704 [0.5]
The Business Environment in Europe
EURR 4908 [1.0]
Honours Essay
HIST 4100 [1.0]
Seminar in Early Modern European History
HIST 4200 [1.0]
Seminar in European History
HIST 4201 [0.5]
Modern European History
HIST 4600 [1.0]
Seminar in Russian History
PSCI 4103 [0.5]
The Modern State
PSCI 4505 [0.5]
Transitions to Democracy
PSCI 4610 [0.5]
Politics of Migration Management

European and Russian Studies (EURR) Courses

EURR 1001 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to European and Russian Studies

An introduction to the study of Europe and Russia, including aspects of the histories, societies, cultures, and politics of the region.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Lectures/groups three hours a week.

EURR 2001 [0.5 credit]
Current Issues in European Politics and Society

An interdisciplinary examination of social, political, and economic issues facing Europe, including the countries of the European Union, Eastern Europe, and Russia.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing.
Lecture and discussion three hours a week.

EURR 2002 [0.5 credit]
Europe and Russia in the World

The position of Europe, the European Union, and the Russian Federation in a global context, including geopolitical, economic, security, and human dimensions.
Prerequisite(s): second year standing.
Lecture and discussion three hours a week.

EURR 3001 [0.5 credit]
Literature and Culture in Europe

A survey of the literature and cultural texts that have defined Europe. Examination of fiction and non-fiction texts that have contributed to and reflected the development of European culture and society.
Also listed as ENGL 3804.
Precludes additional credit for EURR 2000 or ENGL 2010.
Prerequisite(s): second year standing.
Lecture and discussion three hours a week.

EURR 3002 [0.5 credit]
Literature and Culture in Russia and Eurasia

A survey of the literature and cultural texts that have defined Russian and neighboring Slavic countries. Examination of fiction and non-fiction texts that have contributed to and reflected the development of Russian and Slavic culture and society.
Also listed as ENGL 3805.
Precludes additional credit for EURR 2000 and ENGL 2010.
Prerequisite(s): second-year standing.
Lecture and discussion three hours a week.

EURR 3999 [0.0 credit]
Co-operative Work Term

Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): registration in the B.A. European and Russian Studies (Honours) Co-operative option, completion of the Co-op preparation classes offered by the Co-op Office and permission of the Institute.


EURR 4002 [0.5 credit]
Post-Soviet States and Societies

The relationship between social forces and state structures at both the national and local levels in the USSR and the post-Soviet states.
Also listed as PSCI 4502.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5002, PSCI 5110, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4003 [0.5 credit]
Social and Political Perspectives in Europe

Social issues and policies in the European Union including European identity, democratic legitimacy, nationalist and extremist political movements, Euroscepticism, migration and immigration, social inclusion/exclusion and social models, gender and family policy, regional differentiation.
Precludes additional credit for EURR 4000.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5003, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4008 [0.5 credit]
Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Eastern and Central Europe

Ethnic basis of nationalism in the region. Ethnic politics and trends.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4100 [0.5 credit]
Nation-Building in Central and Eastern Europe

Processes of nation building in the region examined in terms of a particular country, or set of countries.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5100, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4101 [0.5 credit]
The Balkans in Transition – 1918 to 1989

The seminar uses the concept of transition to understand the Balkan encounter with modernity and Europe. Key periods to be examined include the interwar era and the period of communist rule, with an emphasis on political, social and economic themes.
Also listed as HIST 4605.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4102 [0.5 credit]
The Balkans since 1989

Selected topics in Balkan politics and society since the collapse of communism in 1989, focusing on the democratic transition and the EU accession process. The legacies of communist rule, democratization and the many national questions that still exist in the region.
Also listed as PSCI 4507.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4103 [0.5 credit]
The Great Russian Novel

A study of masterpieces of prose fiction from the Golden Age of Russian literature. Readings will be chosen from writers such as Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Gogol, and/or others. All texts will be studied in English translation.
Also listed as ENGL 4600.
Prerequisite(s): Third-year standing.
Lecture three hours a week.

EURR 4104 [0.5 credit]
European Integration and European Security

Issues related to the formation of supra-national decision-making structures in Europe.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as PSCI 4608.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5104, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4106 [0.5 credit]
Selected Topics in European Integration Studies

Selected topics related to European integration in the post-World War II period.
Also listed as PSCI 4609.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4107 [0.5 credit]
Russia’s Regional and Global Ambitions

Domestic conditions in Russia from 2000 to the present and the framing of Russia’s foreign policy and strategic objectives towards the former Soviet republics and other key global actors, including the United States, the European Union, NATO and China.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5107, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4201 [0.5 credit]
Special Topics in European Studies

A seminar focusing on selected topics related to Europe.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4202 [0.5 credit]
Special Topics in Russian and Eurasian Studies

A seminar focusing on selected topics related to Russia and neighbouring countries.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5202, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4204 [0.5 credit]
Central Europe, Past and Present

Evolution and current status of Central Europe from periods of foreign control in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries to independent statehood, with emphasis on national accommodations and conflicts.
Also listed as HIST 4604.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5204, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4205 [0.5 credit]
Politics of Identity in Europe and the Russian Area

The relationships between political transformation, identity-building, ethnicity, and gender politics in post-communist states, considered in comparison with select countries in Central and/or Western Europe.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as PSCI 4501.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Department and one of GPOL 1000, GPOL 1500, GPOL 2500, PSCI 2101, PSCI 2102, PSCI 2500, PSCI 3208, PSCI 3209, PSCI 3500, PSCI 3502, PSCI 3704, or PSCI 3705.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4206 [0.5 credit]
Internship and Applied Policy Skills

A seminar accompanying an unpaid internship placement to develop workplace and applied policy skills. Relating applied experience to academic literature. Writing skills for an applied policy setting. Internship placement: 12 days over l2 weeks.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): open only to fourth-year EURUS B.A. Honours students with a minimum B+ average and placement in an internship position in the same semester or in the previous semester (based on a competitive application process).
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5301, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar: six three-hour seminar sessions.

EURR 4207 [0.5 credit]
Politics of Central Eurasia

Examination of the Caucasus and Central Asia, from Chechnya to former Soviet republics of the region, Afghanistan and Chinese Turkestan. Interests of Russia, China, and the United States. Emphasis on underdevelopment, oil and gas, terrorism, Islam.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as PSCI 4503.
Prerequisite(s): fourth year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4208 [0.5 credit]
Foreign Policies of Soviet Successor States

The foreign policies of the USSR and of Russia and selected other successor states, with special emphasis on the search for a new security order.
Also listed as PSCI 4601.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4209 [0.5 credit]
Politics of the Caucasus and Caspian Basin

Examination of the South Caucasus (Azerbaijan, Georgia, Armenia), the Russian-held North Caucasus, including Chechnya, and relations with Iran. Emphasis on state and society, oil and gas, transregional communications, interests of western powers, ethnic relations.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as PSCI 4504.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4302 [0.5 credit]
EU Summer Study Abroad

This course is open only to students in approved summer study options in Europe, particularly the EU Study Tour.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): approval of the Institute.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5302, for which additional credit is precluded.


EURR 4303 [0.5 credit]
Contemporary Europe: From Postwar to the European Union

History of contemporary Europe from 1945 to present covering both eastern and western halves of the continent and including social, cultural, political, and economic dimensions.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as HIST 4606.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5303, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4304 [0.5 credit]
Europe and International Migration

Europe’s role in international migration. Topics to be discussed may include migration and mobility as both assets and challenges for sending, transit, and destination countries, changing geographies of migration, inclusion and exclusion, political mobilization, and responses of European states and other actors.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5304, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4305 [0.5 credit]
Imperial Russia and the Russian Revolution

Examination of the expansion and downfall of tsarist Russia from the eighteenth century to the revolutionary era and the establishment of Bolshevik rule. Topics include the relationship between the monarchy and subject peoples, social and economic change, and daily life.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as HIST 4607.
Precludes additional credit for EURR 4203.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5305, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4306 [0.5 credit]
The Soviet Union: Power and Culture

Examination of the rise of the Soviet Union to a global power and subsequent tensions that promoted its collapse. The course will analyze Stalinism, the Second World War, the Thaw, and Brezhnev and Gorbachev eras through the lens of the USSR’s citizens.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Also listed as HIST 4608.
Precludes additional credit for EURR 4203.
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing or permission of the Institute.
Also offered at the graduate level, with different requirements, as EURR 5306, for which additional credit is precluded.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4704 [0.5 credit]
The Business Environment in Europe

The economic, political, legal, and cultural environment for doing business in the European Union and other regions in Europe. Patterns of foreign trade and investment, market characteristics, science and technology, regulation and European integration, and business culture.
Also listed as BUSI 4704.
Precludes additional credit for EURR 4006 (no longer offered), BUSI 4604 (no longer offered).
Prerequisite(s): third-year standing.
Seminar three hours a week.

EURR 4900 [1.0 credit]
Tutorial in European and Russian Studies

Tutorials or reading courses on selected topics may be arranged with the permission of the Institute and agreement of the instructor.
Prerequisite(s): permission of the Institute.


EURR 4901 [0.5 credit]
Tutorial in European and Russian Studies

Tutorials or reading courses on selected topics may be arranged with the permission of the Institute and agreement of the instructor.
Prerequisite(s): permission of the Institute.


EURR 4902 [0.5 credit]
Tutorial in European and Russian Studies

Tutorials or reading courses on selected topics may be arranged with the permission of the Institute and agreement of the instructor.
Prerequisite(s): permission of the Institute.


EURR 4908 [1.0 credit]
Honours Essay

Individual research project resulting in a major essay, completed under the supervision of a faculty member and evaluated by the supervisor and a second reader. Students should consult with the Supervisor of Undergraduate Studies regarding the topic and supervisor. Institute’s Honours Essay guidelines apply.
Includes: Experiential Learning Activity
Prerequisite(s): fourth-year standing, a CGPA of 9.00 or higher in courses qualifying for credit in European and Russian Studies, and permission of the Institute.


Summer session: some of the courses listed in this Calendar are offered during the summer. Hours and scheduling for summer session courses will differ significantly from those reported in the fall/winter Calendar. To determine the scheduling and hours for summer session classes, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

Not all courses listed are offered in a given year. For an up-to-date statement of course offerings for the current session and to determine the term of offering, consult the class schedule at central.carleton.ca

B.A. Regulations

The regulations presented below apply to all Bachelor of Arts programs. In addition to the requirements presented here, students must satisfy the University regulations common to all undergraduate students including the process of Academic Performance Evaluation (consult the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar).

First-Year Seminars

B.A. degree students are strongly encouraged to include a First-Year Seminar (FYSM) during their first 4.0 credits of registration. Students are limited to 1.0 credit in FYSM and can only register in a FYSM while they have first-year standing in their B.A. program. Students who have completed the Enriched Support Program (ESP) or who are required to take a minimum of one English as a Second Language (ESLA) credit are not permitted to register in a FYSM.

Breadth Requirement

Among the credits presented at graduation, students in both the B.A. General and the B.A. Honours degrees and B.Co.M.S. are required to include 3.0 breadth credits, including 1.0 credit from each of three of the four Breadth Areas identified below. Credits that fulfil requirements in the Major, Minor, Concentration or Specialization may be used to fulfil the Breadth Requirement.

Students admitted with a completed university degree are exempt from breadth requirements.

Students in the following interdisciplinary programs are exempt from the B.A. breadth requirement.

  • African Studies
  • Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • Environmental Studies
  • Human Rights
  • Human Rights and Social Justice
Breadth Area 1: Culture and Communication

American Sign Language, Art History, Art and Culture, Communication and Media Studies, Comparative Literary Studies, Digital Humanities, English, Film Studies, French, Journalism, Media Production and Design, Music, Performance in Public Sphere, and Languages (Arabic, English as a Second Language, German, Greek, Hebrew, Indigenous Languages, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish)

Subject codes: ARAB, ARTH, ASLA, CHIN, CLST, COMS, DIGH, ENGL, ESLA, FILM, FINS, FREN, GERM, GREK, HEBR, ITAL, JAPA, JOUR, KORE, LANG, LATN, MPAD, MUSI, PIPS, PORT, RUSS, SPAN

Breadth Area 2: Humanities

African Studies, Applied Linguistics and Discourse Studies, Archaeology, Canadian Studies, Child Studies, Classical Civilization, Directed Interdisciplinary Studies, Disability Studies, European and Russian Studies, History, Human Rights, Humanities, Indigenous Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Linguistics, Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Philosophy, Religion, Sexuality Studies, South Asian Studies, and Women's and Gender Studies.

Subject codes: AFRI, ALDS, ARCY, CDNS, CHST, CLCV, DBST, DIST, EURR, HIST, HUMR, HUMS, INDG, LACS, LING, MEMS, PHIL, RELI, SAST, SXST, WGST

Breadth Area 3: Science, Engineering, and Design

Architecture, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Engineering, Environmental Science, Food Science and Nutrition, Health Sciences, Industrial Design, Information Resource Management, Information Technology (BIT), Information Technology (ITEC), Interactive Multimedia and Design, Mathematics, Neuroscience, Network Technology, Optical Systems and Sensors, Photonics, Statistics, Physics, and Technology, Society, Environment.

Subject codes: AERO, ARCC, ARCH, ARCN, ARCS, ARCU, BIOC, BIOL, BIT, CHEM, CIVE, CMPS, COMP, ECOR, ELEC, ENSC, ENVE, ERTH, FOOD, HLTH, IDES, IMD, IRM, ISCI, ISCS, ISYS, ITEC, MAAE, MATH, MECH, NET, NEUR, NSCI, OSS, PHYS, PLT, SREE, STAT, SYSC, TSES

Breadth Area 4: Social Sciences

Anthropology, Business, Cognitive Science, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Economics, Environmental Studies, Geography, Geomatics, Global and International Studies, Global Politics, Interdisciplinary Public Affairs, International Affairs, Law, Migration and Diaspora Studies, Political Management, Political Science, Psychology, Public Administration, Public Affairs and Policy Management, Social Work, Sociology/Anthropology, Sociology

Subject codes: ANTH, BUSI, CGSC, CRCJ, ECON, ENST, GEOG, GEOM, GINS, GPOL, INAF, IPAF, LAWS, MGDS, PADM, PAPM, POLM, PSCI, PSYC, SOCI, SOWK

Declared and Undeclared Students

Degree students are considered "Undeclared" if they have been admitted to a degree but have not yet selected and been accepted into a program within that degree. The status "Undeclared" is available only in the B.A. and B.Sc. degrees. See the Open Studies program section of this Calendar for recommended registration information. Normally, Undeclared students are required to be eligible to enter a program within their degree before reaching second year standing. Undeclared students should consult Academic Advising Centre for guidance in planning their studies prior to registration.

Change of Program Within the B.A. Degree

Students may transfer to a program within the B.A. degree, if upon entry to the new program they would be in Good Standing . Other applications for change of program will be considered on their merits; students may be admitted to the new program in Good Standing or on Academic Warning. Students may apply to declare or change their program within the B.A. Degree at the Registrar's Office according to the published deadlines. Acceptance into a program or into a program element or option is subject to any enrollment limitations, specific program, program element or option requirements, as published in the relevant Calendar entry.

Minors, Concentrations and Specializations

Students may apply to the Registrar's Office to be admitted to a minor, concentration or specialization during their first or subsequent years of study. Acceptance into a minor, concentration or specialization is subject to any specific requirements of the intended Minor, Concentration or Specialization as published in the relevant Calendar entry. Acceptance into a Concentration or Specialization requires that the student be in Good Standing.

Mention : Français

Students registered in certain B.A. programs may earn the notation Mention : Français by completing part of their requirements in French and by demonstrating a knowledge of the history and culture of French Canada. The general requirements are listed below. For more specific details consult the departmental program entries.

Students in a B.A. Honours program must present:

  1. 1.0 credit in French language;
  2. 1.0 credit devoted to the history and culture of French Canada;
  3. 1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level and 1.0 credit at the 4000-level in the Honours discipline taken in French.

Students in a B.A. General program must present:

  1. 1.0 credit in advanced French;
  2. 1.0 credit devoted to the history and culture of French Canada;
  3. 1.0 credit at the 2000- or 3000-level in the Major discipline taken in French.

Students in Combined Honours programs must fulfil the Mention : Français requirement in both disciplines.

Courses taught in French (Item 3, above) may be taken at Carleton, at the University of Ottawa on the Exchange Agreement, or at a francophone university on a Letter of Permission. Students planning to take courses on exchange or on a Letter of Permission should take careful note of the residence requirement for a minimum number of Carleton courses in their programs. Consult the Academic Regulations of the University section of this Calendar for information regarding study on Exchange or Letter of Permission.

Co-operative Education

For more information about how to apply for the Co-op program and how the Co-op program works please visit the Co-op website.

All students participating in the Co-op program are governed by the Undergraduate Co-operative Education Policy.

Undergraduate Co-operative Education Policy

Admission Requirements

Students can apply to co-op in one of two ways; directly from high school or after beginning a degree program at Carleton.

If a student is admitted to co-op from high school, their grades will be reviewed two terms to one year prior to their first work term to ensure they continue to meet the academic requirements after their 1st or 2nd year of study. The time at which evaluation takes place depends on the program of study. Students will automatically be notified via their Carleton email account if they are permitted to continue.

Students not admitted to Carleton University with the co-op option on their degree can apply for admission via the co-operative education program website. To view application deadlines, visit carleton.ca/co-op.

Admission to the co-op option is based on the completion of 5.0 or more credits at Carleton University, the CGPA requirement for the students' academic program as well as any course prerequisites. The articulated CGPA for each program is the normal standard for assessment. Please see the specific degree program sections for the unique admission and continuation requirements for each academic program.

English Language Proficiency

Students admitted to Carleton based on CAEL, IELTS or TOEFL assessments and who are required to take an ESL course must take and pass the Oral Proficiency in Communicative Settings (OPECS) Test. The test must be taken before being permitted to register in COOP 1000. Admission to the co-op program can be confirmed with a minimum score of 4+.

Participation Requirements

COOP 1000

Once a student has been given admission or continuation confirmation to the co-op option s/he must complete and pass COOP 1000 (a mandatory online 0.0 credit course). Students will have access to this course a minimum of two terms prior to their first work term and will be notified when to register.

Communication with the Co-op Office

Students must maintain contact with the co-op office during their job search and while on a work term. All email communication will be conducted via the students' Carleton email account.

Employment

Although every effort is made to ensure a sufficient number of job postings for all students enrolled in the co-op option of their degree program, no guarantee of employment can be made. Carleton's co-op program operates a competitive job search process and is dependent upon current market conditions. Academic performance, skills, motivation, maturity, attitude and potential will determine whether a student is offered a job. It is the student's responsibility to actively conduct a  job search in addition to participation in the job search process operated by the co-op office. Once a student accepts a co-op job offer (verbally or written), his/her job search will end and access to co-op jobs will be removed for that term. Students that do not successfully obtain a co-op work term are expected to continue with their academic studies. The summer term is the exception to this rule. Students should also note that hiring priority is given to Canadian citizens for co-op positions in the Federal Government of Canada.

Registering in Co-op Courses

Students will be registered in a Co-op Work Term course while at work. The number of Co-op Work Term courses that a student is registered in is dependent upon the number of four-month work terms that a student accepts.

While on a co-op work term students may take a maximum of 0.5 credit throughout each four-month co-op work term. Courses must be scheduled outside of regular working hours.

Students must be registered as full-time before they begin their co-op job search (2.0 credits). All co-op work terms must be completed before the beginning of the final academic term. Students may not finish their degree on a co-op work term.

Work Term Assessment and Evaluation

To obtain a Satisfactory grade for the co-op work term students must have:

  1. A satisfactory work term evaluation by the co-op employer;
  2. A satisfactory grade on the work term report.

Students must submit a work term report at the completion of each four-month work term. Reports are due on the 16th of April, August, and December and students are notified of due dates through their Carleton email account.

Workplace performance will be assessed by the workplace supervisor. Should a student receive an unsatisfactory rating from their co-op employer, an investigation by the co-op program manager will be undertaken. An unsatisfactory employer evaluation does not preclude a student from achieving an overall satisfactory rating for the work term.

Graduation with the Co-op Designation

In order to graduate with the co-op designation, students must satisfy all requirements for their degree program in addition to the requirements according to each co-op program (i.e. successful completion of three or four work terms).

Note: Participation in the co-op option will add up to one additional year for a student to complete their degree program.

Voluntary Withdrawal from the Co-op Option

Students may withdraw from the co-op option of their degree program during a study term ONLY. Students at work may not withdraw from the work term or the co-op option until s/he has completed the requirements of the work term.

Students are eligible to continue in their regular academic program provided that they meet the academic standards required for continuation.

Involuntary or Required Withdrawal from the Co-op Option

Students may be required to withdraw from the co-op option of their degree program for one or any of the following reasons:

  1. Failure to achieve a grade of SAT in COOP 1000
  2. Failure to pay all co-op related fees
  3. Failure to actively participate in the job search process
  4. Failure to attend all interviews for positions to which the student has applied
  5. Declining more than one job offer during the job search process
  6. Continuing a job search after accepting a co-op position
  7. Dismissal from a work term by the co-op employer
  8. Leaving a work term without approval by the Co-op manager
  9. Receipt of an unsatisfactory work term evaluation
  10. Submission of an unsatisfactory work term report

Standing and Appeals

The Co-op and Career Services office administers the regulations and procedures that are applicable to all co-op program options. All instances of a student's failure during a work term or other issues directly related to their participation in the co-op option will be reported to the academic department.

Any decision made by the Co-op and Career Services office can be appealed via the normal appeal process within the University.

International Students

All International Students are required to possess a Co-op Work Permit issued by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada before they can begin working. It is illegal to work in Canada without the proper authorization. Students will be provided with a letter of support to accompany their application. Students must submit their application for their permit before being permitted to view and apply for jobs on the Co-op Services database. Confirmation of a position will not be approved until a student can confirm they have received their permit. Students are advised to discuss the application process and requirements with the International Student Services Office.

B.A. Honours European and Russian Studies: Co-op Admission and Continuation Requirements 

  • Maintain full-time status in each study term (2.0 credits);
  • Be eligible to work in Canada (for off-campus work)
  • Have successfully completed COOP 1000 [0.0]

In addition to the following:

  1. Registered in the B.A. Honours European and Russian Studies program
  2. Obtained and maintained an overall CGPA of 8.0 or higher and a major CGPA of 9.0 or higher
  3. Have successfully completed by the start-date of the first work term, the required first-year courses, second-year courses ; have completed PSCI 3206, PSCI 3207, PSCI 3208, PSCI 3209, PSCI 3704 before the second work term; and ECON 3807 or ECON 3808 before the third work term

Students in B.A. Honours European and Russian Studies must successfully complete three (3) work terms to obtain the Co-op designation.
Co-op Work Term Course:  EURR 3999
Work/Study Pattern:

Year 1Year 2Year 3Year 4Year 5
TermPatternTermPatternTermPatternTermPatternTermPattern
FallSFallSFallWFallSFallS
WinterSWinterSWinterSWinterWWinterS
Summer Summer SummerWSummerO

Legend
S
: Study
W: Work
O: Optional
* indicates recommended work study pattern
** student finds own employer for this work-term.

Admissions Information

Admission Requirements are for the 2020-21 year only, and are based on the Ontario High School System. Holding the minimum admission requirements only establishes eligibility for consideration. The cut-off averages for admission may be considerably higher than the minimum. See also the General Admission and Procedures section of this Calendar. An overall average of at least 70% is normally required to be considered for admission. Some programs may also require specific course prerequisites and prerequisite averages and/or supplementary admission portfolios. Higher averages are required for admission to programs for which the demand for places by qualified applicants exceeds the number of places available. The overall average required for admission is determined each year on a program by program basis. Consult admissions.carleton.ca for further details.

Note: Courses listed as recommended are not mandatory for admission. Students who do not follow the recommendations will not be disadvantaged in the admission process.

Admission Requirements

Degrees

  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)(Honours)
  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)(General)

First Year

For B.A. (General) and B.A. (Honours)
The Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent including a minimum of six 4U or M courses. The six 4U or M courses must include a 4U course in English (or anglais ). For applicants whose first language is not English, the requirement of English can also be met under the conditions outlined in the section “English Language Requirements” in the Admissions Requirements and Procedures section of this Calendar.

The cut-off average for admission will be set annually and will normally be above the minimum requirement. Applicants falling slightly below the cut-off average will be considered on an individual basis to determine whether there are special circumstances that would permit their admission. Students who feel that their high school grade average does not reflect their potential may apply to the Enriched Support Program (see the Enriched Support Program section of this Calendar).

Advanced Standing

B.A. (General and Honours) Program

Applications for admission to the second or subsequent years will be assessed on their merits. Advanced standing will be granted only for those courses that are determined to be appropriate.